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USB 3.0 Promoter Group Announces Availability of USB Power Delivery Specification

Discussion in 'News' started by btarunr, Jul 18, 2012.

  1. btarunr

    btarunr Editor & Senior Moderator Staff Member

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    The USB 3.0 Promoter Group, in conjunction with the USB 2.0 Promoter Group, today announced the completion of the USB Power Delivery specification, which enables increased power delivery through USB cables and connectors. The specification expands cable bus power capabilities in USB applications, supplying higher voltage and current to deliver power up to 100 watts over USB Power Delivery certified cables. It is capable of delivering higher power to charge notebook PCs and power external hard-disk drives, devices which previously did not receive adequate power from traditional 5V bus power.

    The USB Power Delivery specification enables a switchable source of power without changing cable direction. Existing USB cables and connectors are also compatible with this specification and will coexist with the USB Battery Charging 1.2 specification as well as existing USB-bus powered applications.

    “USB Power Delivery enables a path to greatly reduce electronic waste by eliminating proprietary, platform-specific chargers,” said Brad Saunders, USB 3.0 Promoter Group Chairman. “We envision a significant move toward universal charging based on this specification, most notably for charging notebook PCs using standardized USB power bricks or when connected to USB hubs and desktop displays that integrate USB Power Delivery capabilities.”

    “The publication of the USB Power Delivery specification is an important step in enabling a flexible, standardized power management ecosystem,” said Peter Harrison, Director, Standards Collaboration, Nokia.

    “We believe USB Power Delivery is the next big step in the USB evolution to provide high bandwidth data and intelligent power over a simple, single, ubiquitous cable,” said Robert Hollingsworth, Senior Vice President and General Manager of the USB Products Group at SMSC. “USB has always combined data and power over a single cable, and this is widely believed to be a major contributor to the present ubiquity of USB. USB Power Delivery builds on that success and adds full bi-directional power that can be renegotiated as system power needs change with the end-user.”

    The USB 2.0 and 3.0 Promoter Groups developed the USB Power Delivery specification and have transitioned the specification’s management to the USB-IF. The USB Promoter Groups are now accepting adopters of the USB Power Delivery specification. To download both the USB Power Delivery specification and adopter agreements, visit this page.
     
    Delta6326 and cadaveca say thanks.
  2. Delta6326

    Delta6326

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    ...100Watts over USB!? this can't be right. or is it 10W
    :fear:
     
  3. btarunr

    btarunr Editor & Senior Moderator Staff Member

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    It really is 100W. You can charge a laptop with that power.
     
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  4. hardcore_gamer

    hardcore_gamer

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    Transferring 100W at 5V requires 20A current:eek:. How many lines are they using ?
     
  5. Bull Dog

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    it won't be at 5V it'll probably be something like 30V
     
  6. Xzibit

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    Given the USB 3.0 can be second hottest thing on a motherboard besides the CPU. I'd hate to see it when they add more current through it. Its gonna require its own Heatsink and fan to keep heat down.
     
  7. Sasqui

    Sasqui

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    Reading through the spec, it appears both voltage and current are variable.
     
  8. Bull Dog

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    Agreed. I also went diving into the spec sheet and drew a few conclusions. The new 'PD' connectors proposed are designed to handle 5A for full size connectors (A, B) and 3A for Mini/Micro.

    That would necessitate 20V to deliver 100W at 5A.
     
  9. pantherx12

    pantherx12 New Member

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    External video cards for laptops that won't be obscenely expensive you say!?
     
  10. iO

    iO

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    POW!
    In your face Thunderbolt!
     
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  11. Athlonite

    Athlonite

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    BUT who the hell charges their Laptop/net/notebook from their desktop pft no one I know the only thing I charge from mine is my cell phone
     
  12. james888

    james888

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    No need too. These are popping up a lot now in newer homes. You can even install your own.

    [​IMG]
     
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  13. 1freedude

    1freedude

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    The way I see it, no one can charge a laptop from a desktop now.

    I've said it before, this will work for printers, hubs, routers, modems...
     
  14. james888

    james888

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    That is a great use for this.

     
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  15. Mussels

    Mussels Moderprator Staff Member

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    printers are the only ones in that list that need more than USB 2.0 can deliver.
     
  16. yet-another-account New Member

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    IT industry admits 12-year power brick rip-off

    Once again proving that humanity is doomed, the clowns who manage the USB standard today announced that they could have allowed the USB standard to prevent the endless plethora of non-interoperable power-bricks constantly going to landfill throughout the last 12 years.

    USB promoters defended their refusal to provide meaningful power through USB2 when released at the turn of the century with the feeble excuse that every other standard in IT was - and is - released with built-in-obsolescence. "Why should we have done the human race an environmental and economical favour when nobody else was doing so?" said chief USB promoter Dick Gutless. "The decision was made with broad industry consensus", he claimed. "Silicon Valley shareholders would have caused a riot if we didn't ensure that royalties would continue to flow in for their companies when we periodically 'found' new features for the standard." He stated. "As for the landfill and socio-economic implications of our decision, well it's not as if green principles were all that common at the time. Greenpeace was only formed 25 years before we came up with the USB standard. The UN was only formed 50 years beforehand. Socio-economic concepts were just the last things on our minds. We had not had time to educate ourselves about these concepts. Nonetheless I still believe we were the greatest minds available at the time to work on the USB concept." Mr Gutless re-iterated that there was nothing the USB promoters could do about their failures other than to learn from the mistakes and improve the standard in the future. "Someone suggested we should charge a green tax on the standard to help fund a clean up of all old power bricks in the world. We considered that idea thoroughly but felt such a policy would show the sort of forward-thinking responsibility we couldn't justify to our investors."
     
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  17. james888

    james888

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    I'm pretty fond of usb, this is a good step forward. Glad they finally got around to adding this feature to usb.
     
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  18. INSTG8R

    INSTG8R

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    Welcome TPU :toast:

    Thank you for your rant...:wtf:
     
  19. 1freedude

    1freedude

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    raspberryssels;2679750]printers are the only ones in that list that need more than USB 2.0 can deliver.[/QUOTE]

    USB 2.0 is 5 volt. USB 3.0 is any volt up to 30, and higher power.
    My router and modem are 12 volt so USB 2.0 wouldn't work.
     

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