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Buy cheap or Future-Proof?

Discussion in 'General Hardware' started by Wai_Wai, Jul 11, 2008.

  1. Wai_Wai New Member

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    Should I just buy what I need, or spend more money to be future-proof?
    For instance, should I buy a more powerful power supply (for future-proof) or should I simply buy what I need?

    Things to consider:
    - If I buy just what I need, the price will be cheaper. Higher-watt power supply tends to be more expensive (small rise in watt, big rise in price).
    eg:
    380W: US$61.3
    430W: $70.7
    500W: $87.4
    550W: $101.5
    650W: $121.2
    - Every now and then new technology comes, new types of cables may be required. Then my power supply will die out. :(
    -- The workaround would be to use adapters. But are there any disadvantages/problems?

    Thanks. :)
     
    Last edited: Jul 12, 2008
  2. Cold Storm

    Cold Storm Battosai

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    When you are looking in to PSU's I feel that the best way to know what you need is add all watts up that the products need at load, then after you have that number add 100 watts. Or, you can go to a PSU calculator and it can help you along. The reason I say add 100w is that you never know what your going to do to your system, then with that, you never know how the psu will handle after awhile ether. So, with an extra 100w you can have your cake and eat it to..
    But, this is my opinion on PSU's... Others do it differently
     
    King Wookie says thanks.
  3. philbrown23

    philbrown23 New Member

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    theres no such thing as future proff man, there just isnt especially with am3 on amd's side coming and nalahem on intels side coming, sorry, it's sad but true
     
  4. DonInKansas

    DonInKansas

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    Don't skimp on your PSU ever. Cuz if it goes down, it like to take other components with it.

    Take previous advice on wattage, and go for a well known and respected maker. What's an extra few bucks now to save a crispy system down the road?
     
  5. JC316

    JC316 Knows what makes you tick

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    Learn from me, NEVER skimp on the power supply. I killed some very expensive ram and a CPU on a bad PSU.

    FSP
    epower
    Corsair
    Seasonic

    Those are all REALLY good brands.
     
  6. Darknova

    Darknova

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    Never skimp on your PSU. What you want is a good quality PSU that will last you a good 3 or 4 years. So work out what you need on your current system, then keep going up until you can't afford to spend anymore. That way you won't need to change your PSU until it either gets old, or the power requirements of future PCs outstrips your PSU.
     
  7. Wai_Wai New Member

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    Thanks for all your advice. I will surely buy a decent brand. I won't buy a brand simply because it's cheap. I know the dangers of using a poor PSU.
    Also I will look for not only total watt, but also quality, +12V etc.

    However my major concern is whether:
    - I should buy a PSU which is enough to feed my coming build (but not much room for future expansion), or
    - I should buy a PSU which can stay with me for 6-9 years (having 1-2 major upgrades)

    I'm using this site as my PSU calculation: http://web.aanet.com.au/SnooP/psucalc.php

    My Coming Build:
    Mobo: Foxconn P35A-S, Intel P35 chipset, two PCI-Express x 16
    CPU: E2180 O/C to 3.0Ghz (The PSU calc list doesn't have E2180, so I select E4700 for the calc)
    RAM: DDR2 800 2GB*2 or 2GB+1GB or 1GB*3
    Graphic card:
    A) HD 2600 Pro (will O/C), Dual DVI outputs
    B) HD 2400 Pro, Dual DVI outputs [not for Crossfire]
    Monitor: 20-22", 1680x1050, * 4
    HDD * 1
    DVDRW * 1

    Calculation Result:
    (Note: the calculation has added plenty of headroom in the recommendation, according to the author)
    Recommended PSU wattage for decent brand PSU: 277W
    Recommended 12V combined amps / watts for decent brand PSU: 18.6 A / 223 W
    Recommended 3.3V Amps: 5.4A
    Recommended 5V Amps: 3.9A
    Recommended 3.3V/5V Combined Watts: 31W

    Possible Future Use (Minor Upgrade within 3 years):
    Mobo: Foxconn P35A-S, Intel P35 chipset, two PCI-Express x 16
    CPU: Any Quad-Core CPU (will O/C) (I select Extreme QX9650 for the calc)
    RAM: DDR2 1333 2GB*4
    Graphic card:
    A) HD 4850 (will O/C), Dual DVI outputs
    B) HD 2400 Pro, Dual DVI outputs [not for Crossfire]
    Monitor: 20-22", 1680x1050, * 4
    HDD * 2
    DVDRW * 1
    Blue-ray Burner * 1 (There is no blue-ray burner in the PSU list so I select 1 more DVDRW)

    Calculation Result:
    (Note: the calculation has added plenty of headroom in the recommendation, according to the author)
    Recommended PSU wattage for decent brand PSU: 447W
    Recommended 12V combined amps / watts for decent brand PSU: 32.1 A / 386 W
    Recommended 3.3V Amps: 9.5A
    Recommended 5V Amps: 3.9A
    Recommended 3.3V/5V Combined Watts: 44W

    Future Major Upgrade (after 3-4 years):
    Who knows what the technology will be after 3 years?
    I will most likely make a budget/mainstream build only (not high-end builds!)

    Note:
    * I don't expect I will upgrade my computer within 3 years.
    * I will only buy quality brand / PSU.
    ** Excess-watt approach: Dearer but more room for future expansion. I expect to use it for 6-9 years, ie the PSU will follow me for the current and next 1-2 major upgrades. But I wonder if new technology will kill my PSU after 3-4 years anyway. Another concern is aging. How serious is it? If I go for this route, I will probably select 500W-700W (?).
    ** Enough-watt approach: It's enough to power my current system. And it saves me money. I would simply go for 300-450W PSU.

    =========================================================


    Question:
    What PSU would you suggest in my cases?
    Excess-watt approach (for 6-9yrs expansion), or enough-watt approach (more than enough for my coming build)?
    I would like to buy Uninteruptable Backup Power for my desktop computer. What would you suggest?
     
  8. btarunr

    btarunr Editor & Senior Moderator Staff Member

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    No point in trying to 'future-proof' now, the future processors (both from Intel and AMD) walk all over current offerings.
     
  9. Wai_Wai New Member

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    Why? What are the processors going to do to eliminate my PSU?

    OK, so you suggest I should buy a decent 300-400W.
     
  10. btarunr

    btarunr Editor & Senior Moderator Staff Member

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    Seeing how current 65nm Phenom's have reached 140W and nothing sure about Nehalem, yes, 400~500 should do.
     
  11. calvary1980

    calvary1980 New Member

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    I say cheap, AMD and Intel have new sockets coming soon.

    - Christine
     
  12. JrRacinFan

    JrRacinFan Served 5k and counting ...

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    But dont forget to add Xigmatek, Zalman, and Antec to that list, if not Seasonic built they are ChannelWell built. Grab the least expensive 500W out of those, they should serve you very well.

    EDIT: Also the 6-9 year thing is kind of pushing it due to capacitor aging. Best bet to make sure you have clean good power for your components is to do a psu about every 2 years at the maximum.
     
  13. calvary1980

    calvary1980 New Member

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    Xigmatek, Zalman and OCZ are built by Fortron, Fortron are not what they used to be they don't use high quality components. Raidmax, Mushkin and BFG are built by Topower another mediocre manufactuer. Seasonic's own line is a little expensive and they don't use the higher quality components they manufacture for Corsair Power Supplies, various Antec models are built by Seasonic but they are no where near the quality of Corsair or Seasonic own line.

    Corsair, Thermaltake and Silverstone in that order.

    - Christine
     
  14. cdawall where the hell are my stars

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  15. Darknova

    Darknova

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    And that has what to do with PSUs? He's talking about one specific component of his PC, not the entire thing.
     
  16. calvary1980

    calvary1980 New Member

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    I answered both questions piss off.

    - Christine
     
  17. JrRacinFan

    JrRacinFan Served 5k and counting ...

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    LMAO@piss off

    Please though look into the Xigmatek further.
    [​IMG]
    That's e161451 Link

    EDIT: PS:please dont take this post with hostility Christine. :)
     
  18. calvary1980

    calvary1980 New Member

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    i'm not. I have more hostility against reviewers that choose not to open the housing. your right, i'm wrong it's probably Channel Well like there other models that I googled. they are not cheap on newegg though.

    - Christine
     
  19. Polarman

    Polarman New Member

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    You should purchase the one i have. I should post it on the "for sale" section.
     
  20. Cybrnook2002

    Cybrnook2002

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    Buy cheap. You will NEVER be future proof. ;)
     
  21. EnglishLion

    EnglishLion New Member

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    If you don't want to or don't have the money to spend then buy cheap. Personally if I were buying a PSU now I'd buy the Corsair 650W TX Series. I've heard great reviews and it looks good too for those windowed cases. You can then rest assured that it'll have plenty of umph for future needs.
     
  22. Wai_Wai New Member

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    I have one question. Some motherboards say they are supporting the upcoming 45nm CPU, which are the next generation CPUs. So how useful? If they change sockets, I think those mobo will die out anyway regardless of the "claims".

    After all I feel most components die out too fast so I have a tendency not to buy for the future. I don't buy expensive stuff. I upgrade my computer when I see some big advancements (*real* performance gains, NOT benchmark gains). This would mean 3-4 years per upgrade. When I upgrade, I need to throw most components away. Only a few survive after the major upgrade:
    • Hard drive (hard disk drive has probably the slowest advancement than other parts. Too bad :shadedshu !! Apart from larger capacity, the performance/speed improvement is small. The *real* performance gain is small although SATA may make it look nice in benchmarks)
    • DVD drive (Hardly any improvement after about 2004)
    • Floppy drive ("drive" again. This thing hasn't advanced at all. Well, most should have forgetten floppy disks anyway :rolleyes:)
    • Power Supply Unit (it can survive and serve me once more before elimination. However if new cables come out, it would still kill PSU. Adapters may save him but I'm not sure how big the side-effect is. I feel like not investing PSU anymore. That's why "this thread")
     
  23. Wai_Wai New Member

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    What about CWT? Good?

    Some companies use both good and bad OEMs. It makes the choice difficult. You can't read the UL until you buy it.


    Two factors:
    1) How serious aging is?
    2) What's the average lifespan of a PSU?

    Aging: Since many over-estimate by large due to fear, so they may still be enough to fire up your new system after 3-4 years when you upgrade, serving you for the next 3-4 years. 6-7 service years would be achievable. But how serious aging is?
    Is there any paper or article which look into this? A rough figure is nice. I would like to know the approximate average lifespan of a PSU too.

    Lifespan: Even if it can provide enough watt to support your systems, it's useless if it dies. I wonder if it is possible that it would suddenly die. If so, what happens if it suddenly dies on one day? Bring my other babies to the grave as well? :pimp:
     
  24. ChromeDome

    ChromeDome New Member

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    is it a general rule of thumb one MUST spend over $100 on a good power supply? any sub $100 ones that are good and reputable?

    i was looking at some Rosewill ones. seem to have good reviews and work with fairly powerful systems. i need more PS connectors for my computer for upgrades so i was looking at these:

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817182150

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817182030

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817182032

    and things like it
     
    Last edited: Jul 13, 2008
  25. calvary1980

    calvary1980 New Member

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    this simply isn't a new chipset, it's a new socket. Nehalem is socket LGA 1366. I don't think ATX or PCI cables on a Power Supply are going to change.

    4/7 of Corsair Power Supplies are under $100 on Newegg (MIR) they are not expensive some of the Seasonic models have better inner components than Power supplies in the $200 range. most of the Channel Well and Seasonic built Power Supplies from Antec, Thermaltake, PCP&C, Hiper and XClio are a little more expensive. Rosewill Power Supplies are terrible.

    - Christine
     
    Last edited: Jul 13, 2008
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