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Extension cables question.

Discussion in 'General Hardware' started by CDdude55, Jan 18, 2011.

  1. CDdude55

    CDdude55 Crazy 4 TPU!!!

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    Kind of a newb question guys, but will using extension cables for my PSU's power cables alter the current in anyway that would potentially damage or degrade components?

    Im planning on cleaning up my cables and ive heard in the past that you shouldn't use extension cables for very long because it can prevent clean and uninterrupted power from getting to your components.

    Naturally i doubt that's true, but im still curious.

    :toast:
  2. mlee49

    mlee49

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    Any chance you could use a surge protector instead? I wouldn't trust a 800W power supply on a extension cable.

    One question though, is it a wimpy cable or manly?
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  3. sneekypeet

    sneekypeet Unpaid Babysitter Staff Member

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    the only real issue I see is resistance. The longer the power has to travel, the more resistance it will get from point A to B. If you were to use a heavy gauge (outdoor orange kind) extension cord you would have less issue, but still there would be resistance.
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  4. Chevalr1c

    Chevalr1c

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    I think that CDdude means the internal power cables. Is that correct?
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    Crunching for Team TPU
  5. CDdude55

    CDdude55 Crazy 4 TPU!!!

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    Yep, im talking about the internal power cables.
  6. sneekypeet

    sneekypeet Unpaid Babysitter Staff Member

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    lulz, sorry I just assumed power to the unit...same rule applies, but with the short lengths of cabling the numbers are less noticeable. It goes off the same lore that modular PSUs are inferior to wired PSUs. I run a 24-pin adapter in my rig, and it didn't change my OC ability or make my PC crash more often. If my PC crashes, its cause I raised the bar;)

    Make sure the gauge of the adapters is the same or larger than your PSU wires. Thinner wires in the adapters will in essence make it the weak link/fuse.
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  7. jsfitz54

    jsfitz54

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  8. streetfighter 2

    streetfighter 2 New Member

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    Aight, electronics 101 stuff here. :)

    AC travels much greater distances without as much transmission loss (aka power lost to transmission) compared to DC. DC can, potentially, travel as far as AC but the cables would need to be very thick (perhaps impossibly thick) compared to their AC counterparts; this is due to impedance.

    The electricity running to your PSU from the wall is AC (probably 110VAC) and out of the PSU it is DC (which I know you know but I'm reiterating anyway :)). The impedance of a properly made PSU extension cable with properly made contacts should be sufficiently low that transmission loss would be negligible in most (if not all) cases. In extreme cases the transmission loss might be substantial enough for stability issues to arise, perhaps due to exceeding the amperage rating of the extension cable.

    tl;dr IMO, the transmission loss from a quality PSU extension cable (making good contact) should not be substantial enough to cause stability/component degradation except in the most extreme circumstances.
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  9. CDdude55

    CDdude55 Crazy 4 TPU!!!

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    travva New Member

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  12. CDdude55

    CDdude55 Crazy 4 TPU!!!

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  13. MohawkAngel

    MohawkAngel New Member

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    Look on e-bay for god sake :p 1.99$ including shipping from Hong kong lol
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  14. NdMk2o1o

    NdMk2o1o

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  15. westom

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    Low voltages are harmful to electric motors. Which is why utilities keep voltages so tightly controlled.

    Low voltage is perfectly ideal for electronics. Normal voltage for any electronic appliance also means incandescent bulbs dim to 50% intensity. Low voltage created by long power cords is either more than sufficient. Or the electronic appliance powers itself off.

    Problem with long power cords - human safety. Which is why wall receptacles are located every 12 feet. If a power cord is for anything but permanent power, then the extension cord must be replaced by wires as defined by the National Electrical code. Which is written by an organization whose purpose is human safety.

    Separation between electronics and its supply creates major problems. To do that requires something called Kelvin connections. Your supply is not designed for Kelvin connections. Other problems also exist which is why utility power is provided in AC; not in DC.
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  16. [H]@RD5TUFF

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