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Ainex Releases Ingenious GPU Power Cable Hider Adapter

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A) mentioning china does not mean exclusively though if you want to frame this conveniently to western countries, then you are not including the U.S. or you no idea what fire hazards that can be bought off the shelf in both PSUs and prebuilts. (or are you now moving the goal posts to DIY only?)

B) no 85 isn't 100 but i did mention 95 which is much closer, eh? and really? did you not know the purpose of a back plate is to act like a heatsink for the VRMs?
news flash:
so if a back plate gets hot thats because its designed as it should. (mine has thermal tape even!)

C) dude, buh, i got so much gas - i'm totally chill. you good?
As @R-T-B said, if your backplate reaches 95C, there is definitely something that isn't how it should be. It doesn't matter if it's "working" as a heatsink at that point; it is clearly insufficient as a heatsink at that point. 95C surface temperature isn't an indication that it's an efficient heatsink; it's an indication that it's a woefully underperforming heatsink. So, back to my original point (to which you had oh so many complaints about the bit of hyperbole added, so I've left that out - you're welcome): if your backplate is 95C, hot power connectors is the least of your problems. Either a) it gets this hot during stock operation, which means your GPU has a major design flaw and should never have hit the market, and any damage should be covered by warranty - letting any surface reach that temperature is a major burn hazard, even if it's supposed to be used in a case - or b) you're already pushing your GPU way, way, way past what it's originally designed for, in which case you really should have the sense to maybe not use an SFF-focused cable management adapter like this? Those use cases hardly seem compatible whatsoever, and ultimately, if that's the use case and your cables melt, the issue is PEBKAC, not in the design of the adapter.

If your argument is what it seems to be, which is "this is a bad idea if you're massively overvolting your GPU, the GPU has hot VRM components next to the power connector that sink into the backplate, and you're doing all of this with a dirt-cheap PSU with terrible insulation", then you're making far too much of an effort to find a problem. I mean, no, this is obviously not an idiot-proof product. Few PC components are. But your argument here goes way beyond that, into the realm of being completely unrealistic.
 
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boy o boy, aren't you something . . :eek:
As @R-T-B said, if your backplate reaches 95C, there is definitely something that isn't how it should be. It doesn't matter if it's "working" as a heatsink at that point; it is clearly insufficient as a heatsink at that point. 95C surface temperature isn't an indication that it's an efficient heatsink; it's an indication that it's a woefully underperforming heatsink.
really? a hot heatsink means its an inadequate heatsink? thank you so much for that gem. here i though heatsinks got hot because of the thermal conductivity of what they are cooling. silly me. got more of those generalizations?
So, back to my original point (to which you had oh so many complaints about the bit of hyperbole added, so I've left that out - you're welcome): if your backplate is 95C, hot power connectors is the least of your problems. Either a) it gets this hot during stock operation, which means your GPU has a major design flaw and should never have hit the market, and any damage should be covered by warranty - letting any surface reach that temperature is a major burn hazard, even if it's supposed to be used in a case - or b) you're already pushing your GPU way, way, way past what it's originally designed for, in which case you really should have the sense to maybe not use an SFF-focused cable management adapter like this? Those use cases hardly seem compatible whatsoever, and ultimately, if that's the use case and your cables melt, the issue is PEBKAC, not in the design of the adapter.
but still mentioned it, eh? but again thanks, i had no idea once sentence could be perceived as "so many" complaints. though you still haven't substantiated your broad generalizations - even if it might be a shared opinion. and here you go again with your subjective opinion on what should be available in the market. btw, a GTX 480 rose from the grave among many, many other cards and said hello. now what was that about hitting/not hitting the market?
If your argument is what it seems to be, which is "this is a bad idea if you're massively overvolting your GPU, the GPU has hot VRM components next to the power connector that sink into the backplate, and you're doing all of this with a dirt-cheap PSU with terrible insulation", then you're making far too much of an effort to find a problem. I mean, no, this is obviously not an idiot-proof product. Few PC components are. But your argument here goes way beyond that, into the realm of being completely unrealistic.

lets get the mischaracterization out of the way; i never said anything about bad ideas, cables melting or starting a BBQ fire. ("artistic license" included) i'll repeat what you quoted in your first reply:
though i'll agree a full melt down is highly unlikely i still wouldn't be surprised if someone gets sticky cables.
talk about learning how to take a joke . . "sticky cables" went over your head?

and don't try to accuse/infer/whatever me of a specific use case scenario when your totally blowing off the market this adapter is available. hint: it isn't western. so yeah even though it was meant as a silly comment about china- it's alot more relevant than that of the PSUs in the west. and btw, truth be told. i am fairly certain you believe the great consumer protections you enjoy as a western european applies everywhere.

sorry pal, but it is with great jealousy that i tell you they don't. but hey, totally agree that for an ITX or even an HTPC build that none of this would be an issue. really the first mention was about the pic and if anyone would actually bothered to look and to think about it. there is almost no chance (aside from an inverted case) that the card would be orientated like that.

the only thing i've had issue with is people immediately drawing conclusion about experiences they never had. now who is looking for a problem?

all/any questions in my post were rhetorical - to your's and probably (many?) others relief - i'm done here.

wish you and your's well buddy. :)
 
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really? a hot heatsink means its an inadequate heatsink? thank you so much for that gem. here i though heatsinks got hot because of the thermal conductivity of what they are cooling. silly me. got more of those generalizations?
Jeez, you really don't seem to even want to understand nuance, do you? A heatsink in a PC hitting 95C is too hot, as it is clearly not dissipating heat sufficiently to stay within a reasonable temperature range for consumer use. It is either not receiving sufficient airflow, has too small of a surface area for the thermal load in question, or is a bad design in some other way. This is especially true if the heatsink might be touched by a user. Just look at CPU heatsinks - even if your CPU is pegged at 99C and thermal throttling, the heatsink (obviously entirely dependent on its size, fin array, airflow, etc.) is extremely unlikely to be anywhere near that temperature, and for most heatsinks the thermal delta between it and the CPU temperature is likely to be >30C. It might still be too hot to touch, but not hot enough to burn you if you brush past it. Component temperature and heatsink temperature are typically very different numbers.

If your heatsink is hitting 95C under ideal conditions and this indicates that the component being cooled is within spec, you still have a design that is unsafe as long as the heatsink can be touched.If your heatsink is hitting 95C and is the best heatsink ever made with incredibly efficient thermal transfer, then you have insufficient airflow to dissipate heat. If your heatsink is hitting 95C and is a normal heatsink with normal thermal transfer, your heat source is likely quite a lot hotter than 95C, and your component is likely overheating, making either the heatsink, airflow or both insufficient. Either way, that is too hot for a heat dissipating surface in consumer usage.
but still mentioned it, eh? but again thanks, i had no idea once sentence could be perceived as "so many" complaints.
Not one sentence, but rather the continued harping on an off-hand joke as if it was in any way the gist of what I said, and taking it as an attack rather than a criticism of the unreasonable conditions you seemed to be positing as a baseline for your statements.
though you still haven't substantiated your broad generalizations - even if it might be a shared opinion. and here you go again with your subjective opinion on what should be available in the market. btw, a GTX 480 rose from the grave among many, many other cards and said hello. now what was that about hitting/not hitting the market?
Which generalizations? That temperatures near 100C are too high for safety for a heatsink that might be touched, and that this is thus a bad design? Sorry, that's not a generalization, that's just facts. Consumer electronics should not get hot enough that they can harm you (perhaps except the few that specifically need to get really hot, like stovetops). In general, if your design is a safety hazard, it's a bad design. And yes, that is a generalization, as well as an opinion, but it's also the principle upon which the entire concept of consumer safety regulations exist. So the onus is on you to explain how this might not be the case. A bad design is a bad design, even if it works and is allowed to be sold. Consumer usage is of course different from professional usage, where one should be able to assume some baseline of safety training ("don't touch the hot parts", etc.).
lets get the mischaracterization out of the way; i never said anything about bad ideas, cables melting or starting a BBQ fire. ("artistic license" included) i'll repeat what you quoted in your first reply:

talk about learning how to take a joke . . "sticky cables" went over your head?
It likely did - I have no idea how "sticky cables" amounts to a joke. Feel free to expand on that if you want.

As for "mischaracterizations" - so you wouldn't say that these adapters, or using them, is a bad idea? 'Cause if so, I don't understand what you are saying here at all. Are you actually saying these are a good idea, or that they don't make a difference either way? 'Cause your posts sure seem to lean towards the first option.
and don't try to accuse/infer/whatever me of a specific use case scenario
Infer? You specifically stated that when you overclock and overvolt your GPU, the backplate hits very high temperatures. No inference needed.
when your totally blowing off the market this adapter is available. hint: it isn't western. so yeah even though it was meant as a silly comment about china- it's alot more relevant than that of the PSUs in the west.
But I'm not! I even specifically pointed out above that these have already been available on AliExpress and other places for years! TPU, on the other hand, is a western-facing, English-language tech site, which makes it a reasonable assumption that a press release sent to them means the product is meant for release in markets relevant to the majority of TPU readers. Obviously there are a lot of TPU readers in a lot of places, but the main audience is still EU+US.

Edit: seems I skimmed this too quickly to spot the sentence about no international release, though AFAIK Japanese electronics safety regulations are roughly comparable to EU/US ones.
and btw, truth be told. i am fairly certain you believe the great consumer protections you enjoy as a western european applies everywhere.
Now who is making assumptions with zero basis in what has been said? Heck, I've specifically pointed out that the protections I've mentioned are EU/US ones - it thus stands to reasons that whatever regulations apply in other places - if any - will likely be different in some way.
sorry pal, but it is with great jealousy that i tell you they don't.
Again: no idea where you got that assumption from, but I would assume this is quite common knowledge in PC/electronics enthusiast circles. There's a reason why cheap AliExpress junk has a reputation for catching fire. (That hasn't stopped me from buying and enjoying a lot of it though, and to be entirely clear a lot of it is also very good - but some of it is also downright dangerous.)
but hey, totally agree that for an ITX or even an HTPC build that none of this would be an issue.
Great! 'Cause aside from ITX and using a too-tall GPU in a too-narrow case, these adapters don't exactly have much of a use.
really the first mention was about the pic and if anyone would actually bothered to look and to think about it. there is almost no chance (aside from an inverted case) that the card would be orientated like that.
Sorry, I can't see what you're saying. The pic looks like a bog-standard GPU installation to me, and can of course be rotated to match whatever orientation your GPU is installed in.
the only thing i've had issue with is people immediately drawing conclusion about experiences they never had. now who is looking for a problem?
I didn't have to look for a problem, as I've said above they were quite clear in your writing. As for drawing conclusions about experiences you've never had: I have several adapters like these, and have used them with zero problems. Have you?
 
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someone needs to lay off the caffeine
Jeez, you really don't seem to even want to understand nuance, do you?
A heatsink in a PC hitting 95C is too hot, as it is clearly not dissipating heat sufficiently to stay within a reasonable temperature range for consumer use. It is either not receiving sufficient airflow, has too small of a surface area for the thermal load in question, or is a bad design in some other way. This is especially true if the heatsink might be touched by a user. Just look at CPU heatsinks - even if your CPU is pegged at 99C and thermal throttling, the heatsink (obviously entirely dependent on its size, fin array, airflow, etc.) is extremely unlikely to be anywhere near that temperature, and for most heatsinks the thermal delta between it and the CPU temperature is likely to be >30C. It might still be too hot to touch, but not hot enough to burn you if you brush past it. Component temperature and heatsink temperature are typically very different numbers.

If your heatsink is hitting 95C under ideal conditions and this indicates that the component being cooled is within spec, you still have a design that is unsafe as long as the heatsink can be touched.If your heatsink is hitting 95C and is the best heatsink ever made with incredibly efficient thermal transfer, then you have insufficient airflow to dissipate heat. If your heatsink is hitting 95C and is a normal heatsink with normal thermal transfer, your heat source is likely quite a lot hotter than 95C, and your component is likely overheating, making either the heatsink, airflow or both insufficient. Either way, that is too hot for a heat dissipating surface in consumer usage.

Not one sentence, but rather the continued harping on an off-hand joke as if it was in any way the gist of what I said, and taking it as an attack rather than a criticism of the unreasonable conditions you seemed to be positing as a baseline for your statements.

Which generalizations? That temperatures near 100C are too high for safety for a heatsink that might be touched, and that this is thus a bad design? Sorry, that's not a generalization, that's just facts. Consumer electronics should not get hot enough that they can harm you (perhaps except the few that specifically need to get really hot, like stovetops). In general, if your design is a safety hazard, it's a bad design. And yes, that is a generalization, as well as an opinion, but it's also the principle upon which the entire concept of consumer safety regulations exist. So the onus is on you to explain how this might not be the case. A bad design is a bad design, even if it works and is allowed to be sold. Consumer usage is of course different from professional usage, where one should be able to assume some baseline of safety training ("don't touch the hot parts", etc.).

It likely did - I have no idea how "sticky cables" amounts to a joke. Feel free to expand on that if you want.

As for "mischaracterizations" - so you wouldn't say that these adapters, or using them, is a bad idea? 'Cause if so, I don't understand what you are saying here at all. Are you actually saying these are a good idea, or that they don't make a difference either way? 'Cause your posts sure seem to lean towards the first option.

Infer? You specifically stated that when you overclock and overvolt your GPU, the backplate hits very high temperatures. No inference needed.
But I'm not! I even specifically pointed out above that these have already been available on AliExpress and other places for years! TPU, on the other hand, is a western-facing, English-language tech site, which makes it a reasonable assumption that a press release sent to them means the product is meant for release in markets relevant to the majority of TPU readers. Obviously there are a lot of TPU readers in a lot of places, but the main audience is still EU+US.

Edit: seems I skimmed this too quickly to spot the sentence about no international release, though AFAIK Japanese electronics safety regulations are roughly comparable to EU/US ones.

Now who is making assumptions with zero basis in what has been said? Heck, I've specifically pointed out that the protections I've mentioned are EU/US ones - it thus stands to reasons that whatever regulations apply in other places - if any - will likely be different in some way.
Again: no idea where you got that assumption from, but I would assume this is quite common knowledge in PC/electronics enthusiast circles. There's a reason why cheap AliExpress junk has a reputation for catching fire. (That hasn't stopped me from buying and enjoying a lot of it though, and to be entirely clear a lot of it is also very good - but some of it is also downright dangerous.)

Great! 'Cause aside from ITX and using a too-tall GPU in a too-narrow case, these adapters don't exactly have much of a use.

Sorry, I can't see what you're saying. The pic looks like a bog-standard GPU installation to me, and can of course be rotated to match whatever orientation your GPU is installed in.
ah, i do understand nuances but i am sure you are seeing ones that aren't there. like regulations and safety standards are world wide.
india says hello:
3409369082_4fcfbbbe8b_o.jpg

go google corsair VS series that was an asain market only PSU in ~2008-09 (when seasonic was there main OEM for corsar). those, not just a few but, the majority of the units caused sparks, fires and/or completely trashed the whole system. though you'll need a translator as those sites are in not english - or your native language unless its mandarin or japanese. unfortunately before knowing any of that, i suggested that psu to a guy in tawian on a forum after he gave me a link to where he was shopping and that was the only recognizable of the bunch. corsair thats good right?

a few days later he need a whole system. yeah underwriter lab (who does the testing and certification) is NOT world wide and those products still existed for years in that market.

now to touch on a few "Claims" in your caffeine (and/or ego) driven dissertation"

like i said, one sentence:
and the hyperbole of "your card's on fire" can stop.
i don't care what you say you said but seeing that you mentioned aliexpres, yeah you did, in a post prior to our discussion and most certainly you were talking about the adapters not PSUs.
These have been available on AliExpress, Ebay, Moddiy and various other places for years. I bought a set back in ... 2017, I think? If there's anything new about this, it's someone bothering to package them (and possibly getting the necessary regulatory approvals for sale in Western markets).

though its ok if you wantto "reword" what you said but clearly your saying that i harped, complained or anything else about "cards on fire" is not true in the least. so please keep my words out of your mouth.

I didn't have to look for a problem, as I've said above they were quite clear in your writing. As for drawing conclusions about experiences you've never had: I have several adapters like these, and have used them with zero problems. Have you?

again there is nowhere that i was talking the adapters themselves until my last post. i made it very clear what my problem is with. you on the other hand feel the need to post a wall of text after i suggested leaving it alone.

so who is behaving that they are looking for problems?

the proof is in the pudding. so pal, i'll spell it out. buzz off. i ain't gonna deal with your "lack of truthfulness." -refer to the he said/she said comments w/quotes above.

oh yeah and happy thanksgiving!
 
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someone needs to lay off the caffeine
ah, i do understand nuances but i am sure you are seeing ones that aren't there. like regulations and safety standards are world wide.
india says hello:

go google corsair VS series that was an asain market only PSU in ~2008-09 (when seasonic was there main OEM for corsar). those, not just a few but, the majority of the units caused sparks, fires and/or completely trashed the whole system. though you'll need a translator as those sites are in not english - or your native language unless its mandarin or japanese. unfortunately before knowing any of that, i suggested that psu to a guy in tawian on a forum after he gave me a link to where he was shopping and that was the only recognizable of the bunch. corsair thats good right?

a few days later he need a whole system. yeah underwriter lab (who does the testing and certification) is NOT world wide and those products still existed for years in that market.

now to touch on a few "Claims" in your caffeine (and/or ego) driven dissertation"

like i said, one sentence:

i don't care what you say you said but seeing that you mentioned aliexpres, yeah you did, in a post prior to our discussion and most certainly you were talking about the adapters not PSUs.


though its ok if you wantto "reword" what you said but clearly your saying that i harped, complained or anything else about "cards on fire" is not true in the least. so please keep my words out of your mouth.



again there is nowhere that i was talking the adapters themselves until my last post. i made it very clear what my problem is with. you on the other hand feel the need to post a wall of text after i suggested leaving it alone.

so who is behaving that they are looking for problems?

the proof is in the pudding. so pal, i'll spell it out. buzz off. i ain't gonna deal with your "lack of truthfulness." -refer to the he said/she said comments w/quotes above.

oh yeah and happy thanksgiving!
Man, speaking of ego... I'm impressed with your apparent mind reading ability, as apparently you can tell what I meant to say even when that is directly contradicted by what I did say. As for your high horse "I suggested leaving it alone" - that's rather disingenuous when it comes after your own wall of text filled with false assumptions and accusations, no?

Whether we were speaking of PSUs or these adapters is irrelevant, as they are made to be used together and are subject to the same regulations - or lack thereof. I also don't see why you keep repeating the deluded belief that I somehow believe EU/US regulations apply worldwide - I've been quite clear that I in no way think that is the case. Heck, it's even there in that earlier post you quoted: "(and possibly getting the necessary regulatory approvals for sale in Western markets)" If they would need to get those approvals, even when these have been on sale for years in other markets, that must mean the requirements are different, no?

Thats also where the" harping on about" comes from: that rather than accepting that the issue you raised is an extreme edge case dependent on far more problematic designs than these adapters, you decided to try to make this about me and making up a story about me somehow being unaware that EU/US regulations aren't global. Remember what this topic is supposed to be about?

Also, I never claimed that you said anything about cards being on fire. I made that joke. You were just speaking generally about poor insulation and hot cabling and how the design of this adapter would cause issues... when pushing a massively overvolted GPU with a hot spot next to the power connectors while running a bottom-of-the-barrel PSU, which I then tried to point out is a rather unlikely scenario and could be attributed just as much if not more to a bad GPU backplate design and insufficient cooling as anything else. But I get it, you're not interested in actually discussing anything, you just want to throw comments out there and never have them challenged in any way. Too bad you posted that on a forum.
oh yeah and happy thanksgiving!
Likewise, I hope you enjoyed your celebration of genocide and continent-wide land theft.
 
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