• Welcome to TechPowerUp Forums, Guest! Please check out our forum guidelines for info related to our community.

How to quickly & easily fix coil-whine(coil choke noise)

Joined
Jul 5, 2013
Messages
20,587 (6.10/day)
Location
USA
A forum user recently asked about Coil Whine, which is the noise a choke coil sometimes makes as it operates. This almost always a video card problem, but can happen on any other computer or electronics components employing a choke in it's circuitry, including power supplies.

I have for decades been using a very easy, quick and, most importantly, permanent fix. This fix works 95% of the time to quiet the noise to the point that it is not audible more than 8inches/20cm away. The rest of the time, the noise is barely audible.

A word of caution! If your part is under warranty, you may wish to consider doing an RMA. Most manufacturers actually want the noisy part back so they can test and analyze it for re-engineering to improve future designs. If your part is NOT under warranty, read on...

What you need:
Any tools required to disassemble the part to access the choke coils in question.
One container of cyanoacrylate based glue, commonly known as "Super Glue".

The brand of super glue you choose is not important. The type is. The type must be of low viscosity so it can quickly wick into the empty spaces between the choke coil and the board it's soldered to. The applicator having a narrow tip nozzle is important as it will make applying the glue more precise. See below.

In this photo you can see how I'm applying the glue directly into the gap.
SuperToAChoke.jpg


It's important to use enough glue to completely wick the entire edge of the choke. Then you let it cure for at least an hour(while super glue sets in seconds it still needs an hour or two to fully cure).

Once cured the fix is complete. And you're good to go! Put everything back together and enjoy.
 
Last edited:
Joined
Jun 29, 2019
Messages
74 (0.06/day)
Processor AMD Ryzen 5 5600X
Motherboard MSI B550-A PRO
Cooling Hyper 212 Black Edition
Memory 2x8GB Crucial Ballistix 3600Mhz CL16
Video Card(s) ASUS STRIX GTX 1060 6GB
Storage 980 PRO 500GB, 860 EVO 500GB, 850 EVO 500GB
Display(s) LG 24GN600-B
Case CM 690 III
Audio Device(s) Creative Sound Blaster Z
Power Supply EVGA SuperNOVA G2 650w
Mouse Cooler Master MM711 Matte Black
Keyboard Corsair K95 Platinum - Cherry MX Brown
Software Windows 10
Benchmark Scores 1714 1T - 8768 nT Geekbench 5 /// 264 1T - 2019 nT Cinebench R15 /// 676 1T - 5235 nT CPU-Z
Thank you for sharing this.
Did you happen to check what frequency the noise emitted from this choke(s) had? I'm just wondering if it's the same noise that I'm having right now (10kHz and 20kHz) and does it grow stronger when the GPU is under load? (for me GPU load doesn't matter, idle or not, it's always there with the same amplitude)
 
Joined
Jul 5, 2013
Messages
20,587 (6.10/day)
Location
USA
Did you happen to check what frequency the noise emitted from this choke(s) had? I'm just wondering if it's the same noise that I'm having right now (10kHz and 20kHz) and does it grow stronger when the GPU is under load?
Sounds about right for GPU coil whine. However...
(for me GPU load doesn't matter, idle or not, it's always there with the same amplitude)
...this would indicate it might be a motherboard choke or even a choke in the PSU. The above fix can be applied to each, but before you open up your PSU, make sure it's discharged. Unplug the power cord, press the system power button to drain the PSU capacitors fully. Then you're good. Same principles of glue application apply.
 
Last edited:
Joined
Mar 10, 2010
Messages
10,510 (2.29/day)
Location
Manchester uk
System Name RyzenGtEvo/ Asus strix scar II/Trig
Processor Amd R5 5600G/ Intel 8750H/3800X
Motherboard Crosshair hero8 impact/Asus/crosshair hero 7
Cooling 360EK extreme rad+ 360$EK slim all push, cpu ek suprim Gpu full cover all EK
Memory Corsair Vengeance Rgb pro 3600cas14 16Gb in four sticks./16Gb/16GB
Video Card(s) Sapphire refference Rx vega 64 EK waterblocked/Rtx 2060/GTX 1060
Storage Silicon power 1TB nvme/8Tb external/1Tb samsung Evo nvme 2Tb sata ssd/1Tb nvme
Display(s) Samsung UAE28"850R 4k freesync.dellshiter
Case Lianli p0-11 dynamic/strix scar2/aero cool shiter
Audio Device(s) Xfi creative 7.1 on board ,Yamaha dts av setup, corsair void pro headset
Power Supply corsair 1200Hxi/Asus stock /850 watt ?
Mouse Roccat Kova/ Logitech G wireless
Keyboard Roccat Aimo 120
VR HMD Oculus rift
Software Win 10 Pro
Benchmark Scores 8726 vega 3dmark timespy/ laptop Timespy 6506

eidairaman1

The Exiled Airman
Joined
Jul 2, 2007
Messages
37,418 (6.72/day)
Location
Republic of Texas (True Patriot)
System Name PCGOD
Processor AMD FX 8350@ 5.0GHz
Motherboard Asus TUF 990FX Sabertooth R2 2901 Bios
Cooling Scythe Ashura, 2×BitFenix 230mm Spectre Pro LED (Blue,Green), 2x BitFenix 140mm Spectre Pro LED
Memory 16 GB Gskill Ripjaws X 2133 (2400 OC, 10-10-12-20-20, 1T, 1.65V)
Video Card(s) AMD Radeon 290 Sapphire Vapor-X
Storage Samsung 840 Pro 256GB, WD Velociraptor 1TB
Display(s) NEC Multisync LCD 1700V (Display Port Adapter)
Case AeroCool Xpredator Evil Blue Edition
Audio Device(s) Creative Labs Sound Blaster ZxR
Power Supply Seasonic 1250 XM2 Series (XP3)
Mouse Roccat Kone XTD
Keyboard Roccat Ryos MK Pro
Software Windows 7 Pro 64
Should be able to use hot glue as well.
 
Joined
Mar 21, 2021
Messages
2,558 (4.58/day)
Location
Colorado, U.S.A.
System Name HP Compaq 8000 Elite CMT
Processor Intel Core 2 Quad Q9550
Motherboard Hewlett-Packard 3647h
Memory 16GB DDR3
Video Card(s) NVIDIA GeForce GT 1030 GDDR5 (fan-less)
Storage 2TB Seagate Firecuda 3.5"
Display(s) Dell P2416D (2560 x 1440)
Power Supply 12V HP proprietary
Software Windows 11 Pro 64-bit
Joined
Jul 5, 2013
Messages
20,587 (6.10/day)
Location
USA
Is the noise the chokes vibrating?
Quite literally.
It's actually the wire coils vibrating in the choke, normally. AFAIK.
Exactly.
Should be able to use hot glue as well.
No. Hot glue is too viscous and the heat from the hot glue could potentially be damaging...
and would not flow into the coils.
...and also this. Super glue wicks into the empty spaces and seals air flow so the vibrations have no exit. The vibration energy is dissipated within the coil and any resulting noise is muffled by the coil choke walls.
 
Joined
Dec 26, 2006
Messages
1,877 (0.33/day)
Location
Northern Ontario Canada
System Name Just another PC
Processor Ryzen 1700
Motherboard Gigabyte GA-AX370-K3
Cooling Noctua NH-C12P SE14
Memory DDR4-2133 2x16GB
Video Card(s) Asus Tuf - AMD RX 6800
Storage 960 EVO 500GB OS, 1TB SSD Steam & 2TB WD Blue SSD Storage
Display(s) LG 27UL550-W
Case Be Quiet Pure Base 600 (no window)
Audio Device(s) Realtek ALC1220
Power Supply SuperFlower Leadex V Gold Pro 850W ATX Ver2.52
Mouse Mionix Naos 8200
Keyboard Corsair Strafe with browns
Software W10 Pro x64
Benchmark Scores Starts when push power button!!
I had an old seasonic platinum psu with this issue. I never did tear it apart, although it could have been one of the transformers also. I was going to encase the entire thing in epoxy, but that would ahve been expensive and probably would have overheated and cooked lol
 
Joined
Apr 6, 2021
Messages
487 (0.90/day)
Location
Bavaria ⌬ Germany
System Name ✨ Lenovo M700 [Tiny]
Cooling ⚠️ 78,08% N² ⌬ 20,95% O² ⌬ 0,93% Ar ⌬ 0,04% CO²
Audio Device(s) ◐◑ AKG K702 ⌬ FiiO E10K Olympus 2
Mouse ✌️ Corsair M65 RGB Elite [Black] ⌬ Endgame Gear MPC-890 Cordura
Keyboard ⌨ Turtle Beach Impact 500
There are also non invasive methods to eliminate/reduce coil whine. Undervolting & FPS cap:


You can also try first to figure out if the coil whine comes from the GPU or the power supply, f.e. with Furmark for a GPU stress test & Prime95 for a CPU stress test.

Should be able to use hot glue as well.

That's what worked on older cards with open coils. The newer cards have all coils hidden under caps. But on a PSU you still can do it that way.
 

eidairaman1

The Exiled Airman
Joined
Jul 2, 2007
Messages
37,418 (6.72/day)
Location
Republic of Texas (True Patriot)
System Name PCGOD
Processor AMD FX 8350@ 5.0GHz
Motherboard Asus TUF 990FX Sabertooth R2 2901 Bios
Cooling Scythe Ashura, 2×BitFenix 230mm Spectre Pro LED (Blue,Green), 2x BitFenix 140mm Spectre Pro LED
Memory 16 GB Gskill Ripjaws X 2133 (2400 OC, 10-10-12-20-20, 1T, 1.65V)
Video Card(s) AMD Radeon 290 Sapphire Vapor-X
Storage Samsung 840 Pro 256GB, WD Velociraptor 1TB
Display(s) NEC Multisync LCD 1700V (Display Port Adapter)
Case AeroCool Xpredator Evil Blue Edition
Audio Device(s) Creative Labs Sound Blaster ZxR
Power Supply Seasonic 1250 XM2 Series (XP3)
Mouse Roccat Kone XTD
Keyboard Roccat Ryos MK Pro
Software Windows 7 Pro 64
There are also non invasive methods to eliminate/reduce coil whine. Undervolting & FPS cap:


You can also try first to figure out if the coil whine comes from the GPU or the power supply, f.e. with Furmark for a GPU stress test & Prime95 for a CPU stress test.



That's what worked on older cards with open coils. The newer cards have all coils hidden under caps. But on a PSU you still can do it that way.
Glad you saw what i was talking about
 
Joined
Aug 20, 2007
Messages
18,341 (3.32/day)
System Name Pioneer
Processor Ryzen R9 5950X
Motherboard EVGA X570 FTW Wifi
Cooling Noctua NH-D15 + A whole lotta Sunon and Corsair Maglev blower fans...
Memory G.Skill Ripjaws V 64GB (4 x 16GB DR Samsung C-Die) @ DDR4-3200
Video Card(s) EVGA GeForce RTX 3090 Ti FTW3
Storage 2x Crucial P5 Plus 2TB PCIe 4.0 NVMe SSDs
Display(s) 55" LG 55" B9 OLED 4K Display
Case Thermaltake Core X31
Audio Device(s) TOSLINK->Schiit Modi MB->Asgard 2 DAC Amp->AKG Pro K712 Headphones or HDMI->B9 OLED
Power Supply Corsair RM850x Gold 850W (2021 Version)
Mouse Steelseries Prime Wireless
Keyboard WASD CODE v3 Keyboard with MX Cherry Green Switches
Software Windows 11 Enterprise (yes, it's legit)
No. Hot glue is too viscous and the heat from the hot glue could potentially be damaging...
I used to use black automotive RTV sealant for this, back when I had to fix a bad coil transformer in a big ass 55" Panasonic plasma screen that sounded like an electric bug zapper or something. I don't know if it's better, but it's more electronically safe I think than glue. Not that either is particularly dangerous, but I was just being extra careful (I was once on a pretty fixed budget).

The thing about the RTV sealant is it "gives" a bit when it hardens (becomes rather rubbery), so you tend to need to use gobs and gobs of it. Unless the surface area is huge like mine, your idea is probably better. Good guide.
 
Joined
Mar 21, 2021
Messages
2,558 (4.58/day)
Location
Colorado, U.S.A.
System Name HP Compaq 8000 Elite CMT
Processor Intel Core 2 Quad Q9550
Motherboard Hewlett-Packard 3647h
Memory 16GB DDR3
Video Card(s) NVIDIA GeForce GT 1030 GDDR5 (fan-less)
Storage 2TB Seagate Firecuda 3.5"
Display(s) Dell P2416D (2560 x 1440)
Power Supply 12V HP proprietary
Software Windows 11 Pro 64-bit
Some RTV sealants release acetic acid (vinegar) when curing; this is lethal for electronics.
 
Joined
Jul 25, 2006
Messages
10,027 (1.70/day)
Location
Nebraska, USA
System Name Brightworks Systems BWS-6 E-IV
Processor Intel Core i5-6600 @ 3.9GHz
Motherboard Gigabyte GA-Z170-HD3 Rev 1.0
Cooling Quality case, 2 x Fractal Design 140mm fans, stock CPU HSF
Memory 32GB (4 x 8GB) DDR4 3000 Corsair Vengeance
Video Card(s) EVGA GEForce GTX 1050Ti 4Gb GDDR5
Storage Samsung 850 Pro 256GB SSD, Samsung 860 Evo 500GB SSD
Display(s) Samsung S24E650BW LED x 2
Case Fractal Design Define R4
Power Supply EVGA Supernova 550W G2 Gold
Mouse Logitech M190
Keyboard Microsoft Wireless Comfort 5050
Software W10 Pro 64-bit
Nice little tutorial, Lex. :)

I will add this tip works for noisy and vibrating transformer plates too. And so does hot glue too - "IF" you do your homework and use the right type and temperature hot glue sticks.
Should be able to use hot glue as well.
Hot glue melts at a rather low temperature and would not flow into the coils.
eidairaman1 is correct - depending on the device and glue used.

As can be seen here, many circuit board coils use large, and exposed, wires. These coils typically are permanently fixed in place with epoxy resins at the factory - as are transformer plates. However, some devices may not have had the resins applied properly or thoroughly. Or sometimes, due to abuse, or perhaps rough handling during transport, those windings (or plates) break loose. Even years of heat up and cool down cycles can cause the bonds to break loose.

Hot glue works very well in those applications. Contrary to some of the comments ASSUMING YOU USE THE CORRECT HOT GLUE, it is not too hot and will not damage the device. Nor will it melt when you don't want it to.

"Low temperature" hot glue sticks are designed to melt at variety of temps. Some melt well below 90°C and are even marketed as "child safe" for arts and crafts projects. But those rated around 120° to 130°C work great for electronics. Hot enough to avoid remelting during normal equipment use, but not too hot to cause damage during application. It cools and sets quickly too. And the force applied when squeezing the glue gun trigger is enough to "inject" the glue into the gaps for an effective vibration and noise suppression solution.

Copper melts at 1,085°C so obviously not a problem there. And as seen here, all the most common plastics melt at much higher temps than 130°C.

One tip learned from years doing this - operate your electronics long enough for the coil or transformer to warm up thoroughly first while your glue gun is heating up. Then quickly power down, unplug from the wall, and then apply the glue. This will allow the glue to spread more easily (and predictably) - as opposed to cooling and setting too quickly.

I actually much prefer using hot glue sticks simply because I don't think I have ever emptied a bottle or tube of superglue before the rest hardened.
Some RTV sealants release acetic acid (vinegar) when curing; this is lethal for electronics.
Then, just as Lex points out with superglue, and I point out with hot glue, you must do your homework and buy the right kind. There are silicone adhesive/sealants designed for electronics too.

However, I would never use that for coils or transformers. I am sure it would work - if properly applied. But most typically take at least 24 hours curing time before you can use the device, and even several days more curing time to reach maximum strength. Superglue and hot glue take a few seconds.
 
Joined
Jul 5, 2013
Messages
20,587 (6.10/day)
Location
USA
Undervolting & FPS cap
In my experience, that not only doesn't work, it boarders on being "Smoke & Mirrors" kind of thing.

Coil whine generally exists when a system is NOT under load. Creating a load just makes it louder. The proper solution is to seal the coil so that the vibrations being generated can not produce sound, or produce much less sound.
That's what worked on older cards with open coils. The newer cards have all coils hidden under caps. But on a PSU you still can do it that way.
While a good point, hot glue is much too imprecise and cumbersome to be effective. I've tried it. It's a PITB. Liquid Super Glue is perfect because of it's wicking and quick setting qualities. Super Glue Gel will work in a pinch, but doesn't have the same effect.

I used to use black automotive RTV sealant for this
Have never tried that, but I imagine it would work as long as you can make a perfect(or near perfect) seal.
but it's more electronically safe I think than glue.
Super Glue is not dangerous to electronics, is chemically inert once cured and is a perfect electrical insulator.
Unless the surface area is huge like mine, your idea is probably better.
And this is because of the way Super Glue wicks into the cracks and seams before it cures.

Some RTV sealants release acetic acid (vinegar) when curing
This is true...
this is lethal for electronics.
...this is not. I use white vinegar to clean contacts and corrosion from electronics all the time. I'm careful to clean up excess, but what isn't wiped away evaporates within an hour or so. The type of acid that seeps out of RTV sealant evaporates quickly and is in such a low amount that anything that might get trapped(enclosed) would be harmless.
 
Last edited:
Joined
Jul 25, 2006
Messages
10,027 (1.70/day)
Location
Nebraska, USA
System Name Brightworks Systems BWS-6 E-IV
Processor Intel Core i5-6600 @ 3.9GHz
Motherboard Gigabyte GA-Z170-HD3 Rev 1.0
Cooling Quality case, 2 x Fractal Design 140mm fans, stock CPU HSF
Memory 32GB (4 x 8GB) DDR4 3000 Corsair Vengeance
Video Card(s) EVGA GEForce GTX 1050Ti 4Gb GDDR5
Storage Samsung 850 Pro 256GB SSD, Samsung 860 Evo 500GB SSD
Display(s) Samsung S24E650BW LED x 2
Case Fractal Design Define R4
Power Supply EVGA Supernova 550W G2 Gold
Mouse Logitech M190
Keyboard Microsoft Wireless Comfort 5050
Software W10 Pro 64-bit
...this is not. I use white vinegar to clean contacts and corrosion from electronics all the time.
I agree and do too. Pure vinegar has been used to clean corrosion off battery terminals, probably since the invention of the battery. Diluted 50/50 with water works great on corroded electrical contacts. Full strength if really corroded. Then wipe with a clean damp cloth, or a quick blast with electrical contact cleaner and be good to go.

A tablespoon with 24 ounces of demineralized water and a clean 100% cotton microfiber cloth works great on monitor screens too.

And I agree once again with Lex (we are on a roll today! :) about undervolting. It might stop it, or at least make it inaudible. But it does NOT "fix" the problem. The problem is physical - loose coil windings or transformer plates vibrating and generating noise. You can undervolt all you want. They will still be loose.

So the only way to "fix" (as in "repair") the problem is to "fix" (as in "hold in place") those loose items.
 
Joined
Mar 21, 2021
Messages
2,558 (4.58/day)
Location
Colorado, U.S.A.
System Name HP Compaq 8000 Elite CMT
Processor Intel Core 2 Quad Q9550
Motherboard Hewlett-Packard 3647h
Memory 16GB DDR3
Video Card(s) NVIDIA GeForce GT 1030 GDDR5 (fan-less)
Storage 2TB Seagate Firecuda 3.5"
Display(s) Dell P2416D (2560 x 1440)
Power Supply 12V HP proprietary
Software Windows 11 Pro 64-bit
Joined
Jul 25, 2006
Messages
10,027 (1.70/day)
Location
Nebraska, USA
System Name Brightworks Systems BWS-6 E-IV
Processor Intel Core i5-6600 @ 3.9GHz
Motherboard Gigabyte GA-Z170-HD3 Rev 1.0
Cooling Quality case, 2 x Fractal Design 140mm fans, stock CPU HSF
Memory 32GB (4 x 8GB) DDR4 3000 Corsair Vengeance
Video Card(s) EVGA GEForce GTX 1050Ti 4Gb GDDR5
Storage Samsung 850 Pro 256GB SSD, Samsung 860 Evo 500GB SSD
Display(s) Samsung S24E650BW LED x 2
Case Fractal Design Define R4
Power Supply EVGA Supernova 550W G2 Gold
Mouse Logitech M190
Keyboard Microsoft Wireless Comfort 5050
Software W10 Pro 64-bit
"Do not use "acid cure" silicone rubber for electronics."
All you are doing, Andy, is verifying what was said before. We must do our homework first to ensure we buy products that are safe to be used for whatever we are doing.

In this case, make sure you only buy electronic grade silicone sealants and adhesives. They are easy to find.

And I will point out that there are even many silicone adhesive TIMs (thermal interface materials) that are specifically designed to glue heat sinks on to devices that do not use a mechanical heat sink mounting mechanism. For example, MasterSil 705TC Silicone Adhesive or Easycargo Heatsink with Silicone Thermal Glue Kit.
 
Joined
Aug 20, 2007
Messages
18,341 (3.32/day)
System Name Pioneer
Processor Ryzen R9 5950X
Motherboard EVGA X570 FTW Wifi
Cooling Noctua NH-D15 + A whole lotta Sunon and Corsair Maglev blower fans...
Memory G.Skill Ripjaws V 64GB (4 x 16GB DR Samsung C-Die) @ DDR4-3200
Video Card(s) EVGA GeForce RTX 3090 Ti FTW3
Storage 2x Crucial P5 Plus 2TB PCIe 4.0 NVMe SSDs
Display(s) 55" LG 55" B9 OLED 4K Display
Case Thermaltake Core X31
Audio Device(s) TOSLINK->Schiit Modi MB->Asgard 2 DAC Amp->AKG Pro K712 Headphones or HDMI->B9 OLED
Power Supply Corsair RM850x Gold 850W (2021 Version)
Mouse Steelseries Prime Wireless
Keyboard WASD CODE v3 Keyboard with MX Cherry Green Switches
Software Windows 11 Enterprise (yes, it's legit)
Some RTV sealants release acetic acid (vinegar) when curing; this is lethal for electronics.
The one I used said it was safe for electronics. Anyhow, obviously verify, and probably just don't do what I did, because SuperGlue is just better.

But most typically take at least 24 hours curing time before you can use the device, and even several days more curing time to reach maximum strength. Superglue and hot glue take a few seconds.
Yeah, there are a few reasons Lex's approach here is far better. I was indeed without a TV for a good day.
 
Joined
Aug 25, 2021
Messages
1,302 (3.24/day)
Location
Thailand
System Name Shoebox
Processor 3600x
Motherboard Msi b550m Mortar +WiFi
Cooling Cryorig m9
Memory Crucial Ballistix c16 B-die 2x8gb
Video Card(s) Powercolor rx570 4gb
Storage WD black sn750 256gb (OS), crucial mx500 1tb(storage),Hitatchi ?? 7200rpm 500gb(Temp files)
Display(s) Samsung 65" TU7100
Case Zzaw b3
Audio Device(s) Yamaha rx-v363
Power Supply Corsair sf750
Mouse Logitech g300s
Keyboard Custom Skyloong sk64s
Software Windows 11Pro
I'm curious about this, I'm not a fan of using super glue near heat sources as the fumes given off by cooked super glue can be pretty brutal so I'll try some solder mask. But I have a led controller that sounds like an RC car so it went in a cupboard, I'll find it later and test.
 
Joined
Jul 5, 2013
Messages
20,587 (6.10/day)
Location
USA
I'm not a fan of using super glue near heat sources as the fumes given off by cooked super glue can be pretty brutal
This does not happen after curing is complete, which takes a day or two. I've smelled this kind of problem and I've used this on my personal and family equipment.
so I'll try some solder mask.
I'll bet that works well! Solder mask is generally a low viscosity enamel-ish paint type coating, so it'll wick into cracks and seams very well. Downside, it will take a day of dry/curing time. Super Glue is good to go in an hour. Still, far be from me to tell people what to do with their own stuff. I once used model enamel paint because I was out of super glue, and it worked. I had to thin it out a bit to get the wicking effect and I later did a second coat, still it worked well.


Note to other users, this thread was created to share an effective and easy fix with everyone. Alternate methods & suggestions are always welcome. However, let's keep things friendly and welcoming. Thank You!
 
Last edited:
Joined
Mar 21, 2021
Messages
2,558 (4.58/day)
Location
Colorado, U.S.A.
System Name HP Compaq 8000 Elite CMT
Processor Intel Core 2 Quad Q9550
Motherboard Hewlett-Packard 3647h
Memory 16GB DDR3
Video Card(s) NVIDIA GeForce GT 1030 GDDR5 (fan-less)
Storage 2TB Seagate Firecuda 3.5"
Display(s) Dell P2416D (2560 x 1440)
Power Supply 12V HP proprietary
Software Windows 11 Pro 64-bit
I'm curious about this, I'm not a fan of using super glue near heat sources as the fumes given off by cooked super glue can be pretty brutal so I'll try some solder mask.

Try transformer varnish
 

Attachments

  • Insulating varnish.jpg
    Insulating varnish.jpg
    103.9 KB · Views: 64
Last edited:
Top