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Ryzen 5800x fan noise

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Sep 7, 2017
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System Name Grunt
Processor Ryzen 5800x
Motherboard Gigabyte x570 Gaming X
Cooling Noctua NH-U12A
Memory Corsair LPX 3600 4x8GB
Video Card(s) Gigabyte 6800 XT (reference)
Storage Samsung 980 Pro 2TB
Display(s) Samsung CFG70, Samsung NU8000 TV
Case Corsair C70
Power Supply Corsair HX750
Software Win 10 Pro
Coming from Intel, the fan spinning on my new setup seems a little louder and active than before. Haven't done thorough testing, but idle temps seem OK. Using a 5800x with a Noctua NH-U12A on a Gigabyte X570 Gaming X. 4 Noctua A12x25 case fans (same as the cpu cooler). Idle is 45 degrees. That's OK, right? Fans are quiet now, but any activity (like just a bootup and startup progs getting loaded) gets the fans spinning a little loudly for brief moments. I have the Gigabyte settings at "Normal" in both the BIOS and the app which controls the smart fan control.
 
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First off I'll explain the behavior of Ryzens.

You came from Intel- throw all assumptions out the window. Ryzens don't work the same way or respond the same way.

At idle, an Intel will chop voltages and speeds to all cores, but all cores remain active. So the entire 5-6% load gets split over 6 cores or so. Meaning any individual core sees extremely little load, and has little consequential temps. Any peaks will be due to the starting of services on any given core, which still isn't much of anything but a small, momentary load.

Ryzen is entirely different. With Ryzen at idle, all cores except 1 are disabled, inactive. So the entire 5-6% load will be on a single preferred core. This being a considerable amount of load higher than any single Intel core, so consequently will run at higher baseline temps. The spikes will be from one or several services starting simultaneously, on that single core. The resultant spike is considerably higher than the 3 or so services starting on Intel, only the highest of which is generally reported.

Intel @ 10-15°C above ambient is normal, with 10-15°C spikes. Ryzen is closer to 20-25°C above ambient normally, with 20-25°C spikes. On average, at stock settings and stock cooler.

Your temps are fine, that specific CPU is rated to run up to 95C and be safe. Ryzens use thermal headroom to boost higher, nothing to worry about. Zen 2 and higher CPUs are effectively designed to redline.

As for the fan noise, set a custom fan curve on your CPU cooler and fans so they don't spin up only after 60C or so. I had to do the same with my 3900X and NH-D15. That way it won't continuously ramp up and down with the Ryzen temp spikes, which again, are normal. As Windows concentrates more background tasks on one core, the temp will spike higher, same as when you wake up sleeping Ryzen cores. They wake up at close to full blast then chill a bit, generating the "high" temps.
 
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Joined
Sep 7, 2017
Messages
3,230 (2.34/day)
System Name Grunt
Processor Ryzen 5800x
Motherboard Gigabyte x570 Gaming X
Cooling Noctua NH-U12A
Memory Corsair LPX 3600 4x8GB
Video Card(s) Gigabyte 6800 XT (reference)
Storage Samsung 980 Pro 2TB
Display(s) Samsung CFG70, Samsung NU8000 TV
Case Corsair C70
Power Supply Corsair HX750
Software Win 10 Pro
You came from Intel- throw all assumptions out the window. Ryzens don't work the same way or respond the same way.
Ah, I see. I figured as much. Thanks for explaining.
 
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System Name Grunt
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Memory Corsair LPX 3600 4x8GB
Video Card(s) Gigabyte 6800 XT (reference)
Storage Samsung 980 Pro 2TB
Display(s) Samsung CFG70, Samsung NU8000 TV
Case Corsair C70
Power Supply Corsair HX750
Software Win 10 Pro
Update: I ran into this video and did what this guy said, and it instantly resolved fan noise. What am I missing here? lol. This was too easy. And why wasn't this the default?



edit: Sidenote, I was wrong about my idle. More like 37-ish. Not 45.
 
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Update: I ran into this video and did what this guy said, and it instantly resolved fan noise. What am I missing here? lol. This was too easy. And why wasn't this the default?


Check your clock speeds. I'd imagine with those power settings that you're not running any higher than the base clock.

That approach can be great for increasing battery life on a laptop, but on a desktop you're sacrificing a lot of performance. That's the downside.
 
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System Name Grunt
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Memory Corsair LPX 3600 4x8GB
Video Card(s) Gigabyte 6800 XT (reference)
Storage Samsung 980 Pro 2TB
Display(s) Samsung CFG70, Samsung NU8000 TV
Case Corsair C70
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Check your clock speeds. I'd imagine with those power settings that you're not running any higher than the base clock.

That approach can be great for increasing battery life on a laptop, but on a desktop you're sacrificing a lot of performance. That's the downside.
Yep :\ I knew it was too good to be true. Damn. The periodic spins are annoying as hell.
 
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Yep :\ I knew it was too good to be true. Damn. The periodic spins are annoying as hell.

Have you tried playing around with custom fan curves? I know the 5800X is a toasty chip but the U12S should be enough for the job. You should be able to adjust the spin-up and spin-down times to where a bit of delay will stop the fan from ramping.

These are my settings in Fan Xpert 4 which might be a good point of reference. I'm pretty sensitive to loud fans but I haven't had any issues with ramping.

1614508468481.png
 
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This "issue" is a known one of Ryzens. And it got more distinct from ZEN2 (3000) onwards. For the first time AMD has indroduced for fan control the on die hotspot temp. Intel and past AMD CPUs only used the "traditional" edge temp. Edge temp is a reading from a specific location from a specific sensor on the one edge of the core die. This one is represented on Ryzens by the "CCD1/2 (Tdie)" depending if the CPU has 1 or 2 CCD(s) and its a more steady temp.
The hotspot temp is the "CPU (Tctl/Tdie)". This is for fan and temp cotrol (Tctl) and its a reading that instantly switching sensors to report the highest reading one within the CCD(s). If you observe this temp you will see jumping around like crazy with the minimum effort (CPU load). This causes the fan to spike briefly to higher rpm and that can be annoying depending the air cooler. It can be avoided with water coolers as they tend to control radiator fans based upon water temp which is not jumping around at all. For air coolers the solution is to set a custom fan curve (BIOS or software) but most importantly to insert a ramp up/down delay/delta. 5C delay for instance would require Tctl/Tdie temp to change more than 5C for the fan to start spinning up/down.

HWiNFO_01_03_2021.png
 
Joined
Sep 7, 2017
Messages
3,230 (2.34/day)
System Name Grunt
Processor Ryzen 5800x
Motherboard Gigabyte x570 Gaming X
Cooling Noctua NH-U12A
Memory Corsair LPX 3600 4x8GB
Video Card(s) Gigabyte 6800 XT (reference)
Storage Samsung 980 Pro 2TB
Display(s) Samsung CFG70, Samsung NU8000 TV
Case Corsair C70
Power Supply Corsair HX750
Software Win 10 Pro
This "issue" is a known one of Ryzens. And it got more distinct from ZEN2 (3000) onwards. For the first time AMD has indroduced for fan control the on die hotspot temp. Intel and past AMD CPUs only used the "traditional" edge temp. Edge temp is a reading from a specific location from a specific sensor on the one edge of the core die. This one is represented on Ryzens by the "CCD1/2 (Tdie)" depending if the CPU has 1 or 2 CCD(s) and its a more steady temp.
The hotspot temp is the "CPU (Tctl/Tdie)". This is for fan and temp cotrol (Tctl) and its a reading that instantly switching sensors to report the highest reading one within the CCD(s). If you observe this temp you will see jumping around like crazy with the minimum effort (CPU load). This causes the fan to spike briefly to higher rpm and that can be annoying depending the air cooler. It can be avoided with water coolers as they tend to control radiator fans based upon water temp which is not jumping around at all. For air coolers the solution is to set a custom fan curve (BIOS or software) but most importantly to insert a ramp up/down delay/delta. 5C delay for instance would require Tctl/Tdie temp to change more than 5C for the fan to start spinning up/down.

View attachment 190501
I did manage to get a fan curve I'm happy with, but I'm glad to know it wasn't just me.
 
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