• Welcome to TechPowerUp Forums, Guest! Please check out our forum guidelines for info related to our community.

SK Hynix Updates Memory Catalog to Feature GDDR6 and HBM2

btarunr

Editor & Senior Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Oct 9, 2007
Messages
39,263 (8.43/day)
Location
Hyderabad, India
Processor AMD Ryzen 7 2700X
Motherboard ASUS ROG Strix B450-E Gaming
Cooling AMD Wraith Prism
Memory 2x 16GB Corsair Vengeance LPX DDR4-3000
Video Card(s) Palit GeForce RTX 2080 SUPER GameRock
Storage Western Digital Black NVMe 512GB
Display(s) BenQ 1440p 60 Hz 27-inch
Case Corsair Carbide 100R
Audio Device(s) Creative Sound Blaster Recon3D PCIe
Power Supply Cooler Master MWE Gold 650W
Mouse ASUS ROG Strix Impact
Keyboard Microsoft Sidewinder X4
Software Windows 10 Pro
South Korean DRAM and NAND flash giant SK Hynix updated its product catalog to feature its latest GDDR6 memory, besides HBM2. The company had April announced its first GDDR6 memory products. The first GDDR6 memory chips by SK Hynix come in 8 Gb (1 gigabyte) densities, and data-rates of 14 Gbps and 12 Gbps, with DRAM voltages of 1.35V. The company is giving away small quantities of these chips for product development, mass production will commence soon, and bulk availability is slated for Q4-2017. This would mean actual products implementing these chips could be available only by very-late Q4 2017, or Q1-2018.

A graphics card with 14 Gbps GDDR6 memory across a 256-bit memory bus (8 chips) features 448 GB/s of memory bandwidth. A card with 384-bit (12 chips), should have 672 GB/s at its disposal. Likewise, the 12 Gbps memory chips offer 384 GB/s in 256-bit (8-chip) setups, and 576 GB/s in 384-bit (12-chip) setups. Meanwhile, SK Hynix also updated its HBM2 catalog to feature a 32 Gb (4 gigabyte) HBM2 stack, with a clock speed of 1.60 Gbps. The 2.00 Gbps stack which featured in the Q4-2016 version of this catalog is no longer available. At 1.60 Gbps, a GPU with four stacks has 819.2 GB/s of memory bandwidth. A chip with two stacks, such as the purported "Vega 10" prototype that has made several media appearances, hence has 409.6 GB/s.



View at TechPowerUp Main Site
 
Joined
Feb 18, 2005
Messages
2,827 (0.50/day)
Location
Ikenai borderline!
Man... almost one TB/s. That's insane!
But is it necessary, and does it justify the price? Considering Fury X was primarily held back by memory capacity, not bandwidth, and that even the fastest NVIDIA card (GTX 1080 Ti) can "only" hit 484GB/s, I feel like there isn't really a need for HBM in consumer cards. SK Hynix certainly wouldn't have invested in GDDR6 if they thought HBM was going to succeed it.
 
Joined
Sep 15, 2011
Messages
5,398 (1.68/day)
Processor Intel Core i7 3770k @ 4.3GHz
Motherboard Asus P8Z77-V LK
Memory 16GB(2x8) DDR3@2133MHz 1.5v Patriot
Video Card(s) MSI GeForce GTX 1080 GAMING X 8G
Storage 59.63GB Samsung SSD 830 + 465.76 GB Samsung SSD 840 EVO + 2TB Hitachi + 300GB Velociraptor HDD
Display(s) Acer Predator X34 3440x1440@100Hz G-Sync
Case NZXT PHANTOM410-BK
Audio Device(s) Creative X-Fi Titanium PCIe
Power Supply Corsair 850W
Mouse Anker
Software Win 10 Pro - 64bit
Benchmark Scores 30FPS in NFS:Rivals
But is it necessary, and does it justify the price? Considering Fury X was primarily held back by memory capacity, not bandwidth, and that even the fastest NVIDIA card (GTX 1080 Ti) can "only" hit 484GB/s, I feel like there isn't really a need for HBM in consumer cards. SK Hynix certainly wouldn't have invested in GDDR6 if they thought HBM was going to succeed it.
If the GPU is able to process that much data, sure, even 1TB/s is not enough. Especially on 4K surround setups or 8K future displays.
The question is, are there any CPU, except Xeons, that are able to process that much data coming from the GPU??
 
Joined
Sep 10, 2016
Messages
564 (0.40/day)
Location
Riverwood, Skyrim
System Name Storm Wrought
Processor AMD Ryzen 7 3700x @stock
Motherboard Gigabyte X570 Aorus Pro WIFI m-ITX
Cooling Be Quiet! Dark Rock Slim, CM MasterFan Pro 120 Air Balance, stock 200mm fan
Memory G.Skill Trident 2x8GB 3600MHz 16-15-15-35
Video Card(s) Gigabyte GTX 1080ti Aorus Xtreme Edition
Storage Adata XPG SX8200 Pro 1TB, Samsung 850EVO 500GB, 2TB Seagate Barracuda, LG Blu-ray drive
Display(s) Samsung UJ590UDE 32" UHD monitor
Case Silverstone TJ08B-E
Audio Device(s) Onboard, HD 599 cans
Power Supply Corsair RMx 550
Mouse Rapoo (can't remember the model number)
Keyboard Rapoo v56
Benchmark Scores Look in the various benchmark threads
If the GPU is able to process that much data, sure, even 1TB/s is not enough. Especially on 4K surround setups or 8K future displays.
The question is, are there any CPU, except Xeons, that are able to process that much data coming from the GPU??
The other big issue is getting that data across the PCI-E bus too
 
Joined
May 24, 2007
Messages
1,051 (0.22/day)
Location
Florida
Processor Ryzen 3700x / Threadripper 3960x
Motherboard Asus x570 crosshair- i/ Asus Zenith ii Extreme
Cooling Air/ temporary air
Memory 16gb ddr4 3600MHZ G SKill TridentZ royal / 32gb ddr4 3600MHZ G.Skill TridentZ Royal
Video Card(s) Sapphire Nitro 5700xt / 5700xt waiting on big navi
Storage WD Black 1TB boot / Samsung 970 evo+ 1tb boot
Display(s) Asus XG32VQ / Dual LG 27gl850
Case NZXT H1/ 011 Dynamic XL
Audio Device(s) On board/ Soundblaster ZXR
Power Supply Seasonic Platinum 1200w / Seasonic Prime Titanium 1000w
Mouse Logitech G 900/ Razer Viper Ultimate wireless
Keyboard Razer Chroma Black Widow/ Logitech G915 Wireless
Software Win 10 Pro
It's not a fact of is it necessary but...I say bring it on, advancement is needed in all sectors. Isn't the gen4(pci-e) standard due out soon enough(2yrs).
We need the advancement of every field.
 
Joined
Sep 11, 2015
Messages
404 (0.23/day)
It's not a fact of is it necessary but...I say bring it on, advancement is needed in all sectors. Isn't the gen4(pci-e) standard due out soon enough(2yrs).
We need the advancement of every field.
The exciting part is the direction that they are 'cutting through' with this. Just the fact that they're improving these numbers, even if it may not be something you can take much advantage of in the first gen or so. They're saying "look what we can do" and letting the others hear that they have to catch up or be known for bottlenecking the whole industry. Eventually the bottlenecks go away and these things do become useful. I would even argue that having advancement in this area without "much use" right now only strengthens the argument that this is something we need to be looking at more intensely.
 
Top