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TPU's Nostalgic Hardware Club

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They're not as easy to overclock as you think.
We did a simple FSB + voltage boost. The AGP/PCI clock were not affected IIRC. He ran it for a solid year at 1ghz before upgrading to a Thunderbird 1.3ghz and OC'd it to 1600. Both took some trial and error but were not difficult to get there.
By the way, here is the records for 750 Pluto.
Make sure you check the WR frequency out. ;)
http://hwbot.org/hardware/processor/athlon_750_pluto_slot_a/
Interesting link. Don't know what to tell you but 1ghz for the Pluto cores were fairly common. Orion cores were even better. We're talking about a very modest 25% OC with a voltage boost. The same generation of Pentium 3's easily got 50% OC's by similar methods with no ill effects. Even the older K-6's and Pentium 2's could handle 25% OC with ease.

Bought a QDI P3 Capable Board from New ( With a S370 P3 800Mhz CPU :) ) ran AGP Graphics Cards in it never had any problems never needed to update bios.
Maybe it was the AMD CPU Variants that were problematical ?
I think you're right. Can't remember it ever happening on Intel boards.
 
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All new & improved, Deep Cool heatsink series! Now with 50% less cooling fins & twice as light than previous models, for easy installation :D
 
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All for the greater good :D The V3 was missing a heatsink so I had to use what I had :D - three tantalum capacitors in the way, a clock crystal plus the AGP slot :D - some trimming required :D

I could've used a square heatsink and attach it via a metal plate/strip with screws. The V3 2000 has a smaller heatsink than this and I said to myself why not use the DeepCool V50 ?!?!?! :D

This is the first version. The second time I'm going to do it (if needed) it's going to look even better :D The aluminium is sooooo soft and scratches so easily. All the operation with the cutting, trimming, filling, cleaning and test fitting took me around 2-3 hours...I lost track...regardless, the contact and the pressure of the "new heatsink" are far better than the old glue and heatsink used. MX-4 is better too at cooling the V3. This modification allowed me to gather information and now I can modifiy these heatsinks in less than an hour :D The mounting holes had to be enlarged to make the heastink fit on the card and also to have just a little sideways play in the push-pins so that it wont sit to tightly on the chip. After I put MX-4 I saw that the pressure was good and because I used a little to much paste it came out from all the corners of the graphic chip.

I still have to solder three SMD 10uf/16V capacitors and see if the relic is alive :D
 

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All for the greater good :D the V3 was missing a heatsink so I had to use what I had :D - three tantalum capacitors in the way, a clock crystal plus the AGP slot :D - some trimming required :D

I could've used a square heatsink and attach it via a metal plate/strip with screws. The V3 2000 has a smaller heatsink than this and I said to myself why not use the Deep Cool V50 ?!?!?! :D

This is the first version. The second time I'm going to do it (if needed) it's going to look even better :D

I still have to solder three SMD 10uf/16V capacitors and see if the relic is alive :D
You know, you could have just bought one of these... ;) They're dirt cheap & come with free delivery world-wide.

#1, #2, #3
 
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The DeepCool V50 has 55 mm mounting holes but I had to enlarge them quite a bit to get it to fit on the V3. The bad part is that it is round.

The chip of the V3 sits low on the PCB and you have to be careful what heatsink you use and how you attach it otherwise the card wont fit in the slot.

I searched in my stash for other heatsinks but since this one was available I wanted to use it. :D I tried 4 other heasinks and they werent even close to what I needed.
 
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No idea until I solder the SMD caps and run some 3dmark99 :D - my gut feeling says it is better than the stock V3 heatsink. I used this DeepCool V50 on GF2 Ti and GF3 ti 200 with great results :) It is cheap silent and well put together.

If you think about it: usually you can see spaces under the V3 glued heatsinks if you watch closely against a source of light. Now with better contact, better thermal grease things are just going to get better IMO :D And lets be honest how good is an almost 20 years old thermal glue with a sloppy spread?

I should've made the mod with less haste so that there wont be scratches on the fins and place some tape on the bottom of the heatsink. Nevertheless this was a valauble lesson which I will put to good use when I FIND MY V5 5500 AGP card and believe me I wont stop until I find MY V5 :) - I had some offers but the prices were out of this world. I must be pacient :)
 
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No idea until I solder the SMD caps and run some 3dmark99 :D - my gut feeling says it is better than the stock V3 heatsink. I used this DeepCool V50 on GF2 Ti and GF3 ti 200 with great results :) It is cheapm silent and well put together.
That would be an interesting result to see.
 
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We did a simple FSB + voltage boost. The AGP/PCI clock were not affected IIRC. He ran it for a solid year at 1ghz

Interesting link. Don't know what to tell you but 1ghz for the Pluto cores were fairly common. Orion cores were even better. We're talking about a very modest 25% OC with a voltage boost.
I think you're mistaken. It's not common at all.
If you actually clicked on the link you would see that I hold the world record frequency for 750 Pluto @ 977.51
I will also tell you that it took mega voltage and sub zero cooling to get there and no chance in hell for it to run stably for day to day usage, let alone for a year.
 
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I think you're mistaken. It's not common at all.
I'm not. Saw several instances of this OC first hand, having done two of them myself. Actual experience.
If you actually clicked on the link you would see that I hold the world record frequency for 750 Pluto @ 977.51
I did actually click. There are two flaws with your perspective. 1; you assume your particular CPU was a winner in the silicon lottery and that no other examples of that same model are better. 2; you assume that website is the end-all-be-all of measured maximum OC performance. It is not or there would be a much higher number of sample example sets. 77 is not a representative sample set.
I will also tell you that it took mega voltage and sub zero cooling to get there and no chance in hell for it to run stably for day to day usage, let alone for a year.
You needed sub-zero cooling to get less than a 40% OC? You were doing something wrong. AMD didn't push the Pluto cores that close to their limits. A customer of the shop I was working for at the time got his 800mhz Pluto to 1066mhz. Again, not a massive OC for 180nm process.
 

dorsetknob

"YOUR RMA REQUEST IS CON-REFUSED"
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Dorset where else eh? >>> Thats ENGLAND<<<
Casually slide's into the conversation

If you actually clicked on the link you would see that I hold the world record frequency for 750 Pluto @ 977.51
I will also tell you that it took mega voltage and sub zero cooling to get there and no chance in hell for it to run stably for day to day usage, let alone for a year.
Excuse the pun but "" COOL "" and good for you:respect::respect::respect:
 
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Video Card(s) nVidia GeForce4 Titanium 4200, 2x 3dfx Voodoo2 1000 12Mb
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Display(s) LG StudioWorks 57M
Case Cooler Master, ATX
Audio Device(s) Diamond Monster MX300, Creative WaveBlaster II
Power Supply 300W, ATX
Mouse Genius SlimStar 110, PS/2
Keyboard Genius SlimStar 110, PS/2
Software Windows 98 2nd Edition, Windows XP Home (SP1)
By the way @stinger608 , would you like to add this link onto the first page? nVidia Windows 95/98/Me Driver Archive Windows XP/2000 Driver Archive

Alternative link(s) are available through OldApps for both nVidia & ATI, although only the latest "Radeon" series seems to be supported through there. Therefore "Rage" & "Mach" product lines are not listed. Some of these can be found on Vogons Vintage Driver Library, but again not all of them. Rage II series for example doesn't seem to be listed anywhere.

Update
Found the Legacy driver database for AMD/ATI... For both 98/ME & 2000/XP
 
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All three 3dfx cards work like a dream:

V3 3000 repaired - three new caps - the modified DeepCool V50 works a treat. My thumb-o-meter registered a much lower temperature than that of the V3 2000 and Gainward Dragon 4000 VooDoo Banshee both with passive heatsinks. In the case of the V3 2000 and GWD 4000 I could feel the heat spreading further on the PCB than in the case of the modified V3 3000 :D sweeeeetttt

V3 2000 - mint

Gainward Dragon 4000 Banshee AGP - one new cap

Now I must clean them well and tell you their story :)

WIN! WIN! WIN!
 

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System Name RetroMaster 2500
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Cooling Cooler Master Jet7
Memory 2x 256MB DDR1, 400MHz
Video Card(s) nVidia GeForce4 Titanium 4200, 2x 3dfx Voodoo2 1000 12Mb
Storage Seagate Barracuda 80GB (ATA), Seagate Barracuda 40GB (ATA)
Display(s) LG StudioWorks 57M
Case Cooler Master, ATX
Audio Device(s) Diamond Monster MX300, Creative WaveBlaster II
Power Supply 300W, ATX
Mouse Genius SlimStar 110, PS/2
Keyboard Genius SlimStar 110, PS/2
Software Windows 98 2nd Edition, Windows XP Home (SP1)
All three 3dfx cards work like a dream:

V3 3000 repaired - three new caps - the modified DeepCool V50 works a treat. My thumb-o-meter registered a much lower temperature than that of the V3 2000 and Gainward Dragon 4000 Banshee both with passive heatsinks. In the case of the V3 2000 and GWD 4000 I could feel the heat spreading further on the PCB than in the case of the modified V3 3000 :D sweeeeetttt

V3 2000 - mint

Gainward Dragon 4000 Banshee AGP - one new cap

WIN! WIN! WIN!
Good work saving those true classics! If there's anything I learned collecting old hardware throughout the years is that you can never, EVER have too much 3dfx cards laying around :) I once had a similar situation with Radeon X1550, some idiot replaced all the caps with different ones, each with different specs & brands. To make things even worse, it seems that he installed used caps, so you can understand why I wasn't surprised to see artifacts all over the screen when I plugged it into the system. But just like you, I was able to recap all of them & save the card ;) It's inside that S775 Pentium 4 system, the most powerful (modern) RetroMaster unit, in my collection. Named "4000"
 
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I'm not. Saw several instances of this OC first hand, having done two of them myself. Actual experience.

I did actually click. There are two flaws with your perspective. 1; you assume your particular CPU was a winner in the silicon lottery and that no other examples of that same model are better. 2; you assume that website is the end-all-be-all of measured maximum OC performance. It is not or there would be a much higher number of sample example sets. 77 is not a representative sample set.

You needed sub-zero cooling to get less than a 40% OC? You were doing something wrong. AMD didn't push the Pluto cores that close to their limits. A customer of the shop I was working for at the time got his 800mhz Pluto to 1066mhz. Again, not a massive OC for 180nm process.
I assume nothing. I know there are probably better samples.
If you're going to compare benchmarks, there is no better place than HWB.
I just provided documented proof
and you provided..........heresay and a story.
:rolleyes:
Can't show proof? Then it never happened. Sorry but that's the way it goes.
Don't you think if it were that common and easy you would see more ?
Of course ..............I don't know anything.
That's fine.
I'll just keep it to myself.
 
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Can't show proof? Then it never happened. Sorry but that's the way it goes.
Ok, we're talking about nearly 20 year old hardware. You really expect someone to be able to provide proof for something that old?
If you're going to compare benchmarks, there is no better place than HWB.
That site wasn't founded until several years after that series of CPU's, which weren't very popular, was discontinued. How many people do you think are going to hold on to systems that old just so they can set a record on an obscure little site that barely existed when it was started and most people still have never heard of? Again sample size is small.
I just provided documented proof
Interesting example of proof..
Don't you think if it were that common and easy you would see more ?
No, for several reasons that have already been explored.
Of course ..............I don't know anything.
I never said that nor implied it. Your statement demonstrates that, for you, this is somewhat about ego. Let it go.
I'll just keep it to myself.
Good idea. Implying someone is either an idiot or lying without anything more than the less than stellar example you posted is going to provoke a response, thus our exchange.

I will say this about the subject, @Robert B has a Pluto based CPU and motherboard to go with it. If they both work properly, and he's willing to give it a go, maybe he can OC it and take a few screenshots to show us the max OC he can get. My guess is that he'll be able to hit 1ghz with little trouble and a voltage bump to 1.75, 1.8 or even 1.85. Given the default voltage of 1.6 to 1.65 that's not a massive bump and won't hurt the chip. This assumes the motherboard has OC options in the bios, not all of them did. What do you say Rob? Want to give it a go, even if just for giggles to offer some insight to this debate? Could be interesting.
 
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I'll try but I can say that with the other ASUS K7M I have and a K7-700MHz -Pluto core, OC wasnt exactly a breeze. This was last year and I must say I didnt try too hard to OC. I tried several setings: voltages, jumpers and 103/105/110 bus but the settings werent saved after restart. After a few failed attempts it was obvious I needed a Goldfinger device. The K7M has OC settings bus and voltages and I'll try again after I clean and assemble the second K7M and the K7-800 Thunderbird I found.

If Mr.Scott has a few pointers I'm all ears. I'm no OC guru but I'm familiar to OC-ing older systems.
 
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Why don't we all agree to disagree... Let's just keep it at that, certainly isn't the first time for someone to have different opinion on something, especially hardware :peace:
 
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I'll try but I can say that with the other ASUS K7M I have and a K7-700MHz -Pluto core, OC wasnt exactly a breeze. This was last year and I must say I didnt try too hard to OC. I tried several setings: voltages, jumpers and 103/105/110 bus but the settings werent saved after restart. After a few failed attempts it was obvious I needed a Goldfinger device. The K7M has OC settings bus and voltages and I'll try again after I clean and assemble the second K7M and the K7-800 Thunderbird I found.

If Mr.Scott has a few pointers I'm all ears. I'm no OC guru but I'm familiar to OC-ing older systems.
One of the keys to OCing those chips was the cooling. They did require a larger heatsink with a high airflow fan. The stock heatsinks, even with a better fan, were not up to the task.

Why don't we all agree to disagree...
Agreed.

Rob does have the hardware and seems willing. This could turn into an interesting and fun experiment..
 
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was it these or was it earlier AMD CPU's where you could use "electrical Paint " to Mod the CPU for Overclocking ???
Actually, those were the very next generation socket CPU's, Socket A(462). That was even more fun stuff to OC! For a time AMD was the OC king with many of those models.
 
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I will say this about the subject, @Robert B has a Pluto based CPU and motherboard to go with it. If they both work properly, and he's willing to give it a go, maybe he can OC it and take a few screenshots to show us the max OC he can get. My guess is that he'll be able to hit 1ghz with little trouble and a voltage bump to 1.75, 1.8 or even 1.85. Given the default voltage of 1.6 to 1.65 that's not a massive bump and won't hurt the chip. This assumes the motherboard has OC options in the bios, not all of them did. What do you say Rob? Want to give it a go, even if just for giggles to offer some insight to this debate? Could be interesting.
I'll take that bet.
Ok, we're talking about nearly 20 year old hardware. You really expect someone to be able to provide proof for something that old?

That site wasn't founded until several years after that series of CPU's, which weren't very popular, was discontinued. How many people do you think are going to hold on to systems that old just so they can set a record on an obscure little site that barely existed when it was started and most people still have never heard of? Again sample size is small.

Interesting example of proof..

No, for several reasons that have already been explored.

I never said that nor implied it. Your statement demonstrates that, for you, this is somewhat about ego. Let it go.

Good idea. Implying someone is either an idiot or lying without anything more than the less than stellar example you posted is going to provoke a response, thus our exchange.

I will say this about the subject, @Robert B has a Pluto based CPU and motherboard to go with it. If they both work properly, and he's willing to give it a go, maybe he can OC it and take a few screenshots to show us the max OC he can get. My guess is that he'll be able to hit 1ghz with little trouble and a voltage bump to 1.75, 1.8 or even 1.85. Given the default voltage of 1.6 to 1.65 that's not a massive bump and won't hurt the chip. This assumes the motherboard has OC options in the bios, not all of them did. What do you say Rob? Want to give it a go, even if just for giggles to offer some insight to this debate? Could be interesting.
Passive aggressive just pisses me off.
Has nothing to do with ego. Just facts.
:lovetpu:
 
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