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Wifi extender and Router

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if the Router(Wifi 5) is gonna limitin the WIFI 6 extender.
if the router only provides speeds up to 5, & the extender is capable of 6, then , yes it will limit performance, as the extender could perform faster with a wifi6 capable access point.
i honestly wouldnt lose too much sleep over 5 VS 6, but thats up to you
 
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Really depends on what performance the ISP is giving, distance and interference between the router and extender along with the spec of the wifi clients.

As with golfer, I would not lose any sleep over it.
 
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The performance is always limited by the weakest link. Don't forget, that could easily be the wifi adapter of your distant wireless computer.
 

diogoBRRN

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if the router only provides speeds up to 5, & the extender is capable of 6, then , yes it will limit performance, as the extender could perform faster with a wifi6 capable access point.
i honestly wouldnt lose too much sleep over 5 VS 6, but thats up to you
But if the extender is connect in modem with a ETHERNET(GigaBit), the connection will coming for a cable, not wireless, right? So how modem can limit the wifi type of the extender?
 
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Seems to me an extender halves the possible bandwidth since it listens and talks on the same frequency, so I prefer to use two units back to back (one as a bridge and one as a base station) so I can separate the channels and keep the full bandwidth.
 
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But if the extender is connect in modem with a ETHERNET(GigaBit), the connection will coming for a cable, not wireless, right? So how modem can limit the wifi type of the extender?
I think there is some confusion over which network we are talking about. You have your LAN (local area network) - that is, everything on your side of the "gateway" device, typically the modem. The other network is the WAN (wide area network) or specifically in this case, the Internet.

The performance of your local network is based on the weakest link in your local network. That does NOT include the modem (see note below). The performance of your Internet is also based on the weakest link but in this case that could be your modem, or it could be (and likely is) the performance of the service your ISP is providing.

Note: It is important to understand the differences between the various network devices.

1. A modem (modulator/demodulator) is used as a "gateway device" to provide access to the ISP's network and the Internet.

2. A router has just one “wired” input and one “wired” output and is used to connect (or isolate) two networks. In a home network a router connects "your network" (the router and everything on your side of the router) to the ISP's network (and the Internet) through the gateway device/modem.

3. A Ethernet switch (also called a switching hub) is used to connect via an Ethernet cable, multiple networked devices on your network to the one input port on your side of the router.

4. A WAP is used to provide wireless (Wifi) access to your network. The WAP actually connects internally to a 5th Ethernet port of the switch. An extender is a type of WAP.​

Technically speaking, there is no such thing as a "wireless router". That is simply a "marketing" term for a "3-way" "integrated" device consisting of a router, a Ethernet switch (typically 4-port), and a WAP. These are three discrete network devices that just happen to share the same box, same PCB (printed circuit board) and same power supply. Note the 4-port switch connects internally to the router's one input. And the WAP actually connects internally to a 5th Ethernet port of the switch.

In recent years manufacturers have also been integrating a modem with "wireless routers" for a 4-way integrated device. Four discrete network devices in one box. These are "marketed" under different terms like "residential gateway" devices, "wireless modems" or " wireless modem/routers".

In some cases, they even have 5-way devices that integrate Internet phone (voice over IP or VoIP) too. Five discrete devices, in one box.

I mention these differences because terms are often intermixed incorrectly. People will say modem when it is really the integrated router they are talking about. Or they say router when it is really the integrated WAP. So we really need to be talking about the "function" as well as the device, and not get them mixed up.
 

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Seems to me an extender halves the possible bandwidth since it listens and talks on the same frequency, so I prefer to use two units back to back (one as a bridge and one as a base station) so I can separate the channels and keep the full bandwidth.
I was thinking in doing a bridge, but ISP blocked the modem configurations, so can't turn off the DHCP, wifi etc. :(:(

I think there is some confusion over which network we are talking about. You have your LAN (local area network) - that is, everything on your side of the "gateway" device, typically the modem. The other network is the WAN (wide area network) or specifically in this case, the Internet.

The performance of your local network is based on the weakest link in your local network. That does NOT include the modem (see note below). The performance of your Internet is also based on the weakest link but in this case that could be your modem, or it could be (and likely is) the performance of the service your ISP is providing.

Note: It is important to understand the differences between the various network devices.

1. A modem (modulator/demodulator) is used as a "gateway device" to provide access to the ISP's network and the Internet.​
2. A router has just one “wired” input and one “wired” output and is used to connect (or isolate) two networks. In a home network a router connects "your network" (the router and everything on your side of the router) to the ISP's network (and the Internet) through the gateway device/modem.​
3. A Ethernet switch (also called a switching hub) is used to connect via an Ethernet cable, multiple networked devices on your network to the one input port on your side of the router.​
4. A WAP is used to provide wireless (Wifi) access to your network. The WAP actually connects internally to a 5th Ethernet port of the switch. An extender is a type of WAP.​

Technically speaking, there is no such thing as a "wireless router". That is simply a "marketing" term for a "3-way" "integrated" device consisting of a router, a Ethernet switch (typically 4-port), and a WAP. These are three discrete network devices that just happen to share the same box, same PCB (printed circuit board) and same power supply. Note the 4-port switch connects internally to the router's one input. And the WAP actually connects internally to a 5th Ethernet port of the switch.

In recent years manufacturers have also been integrating a modem with "wireless routers" for a 4-way integrated device. Four discrete network devices in one box. These are "marketed" under different terms like "residential gateway" devices, "wireless modems" or " wireless modem/routers".

In some cases, they even have 5-way devices that integrate Internet phone (voice over IP or VoIP) too. Five discrete devices, in one box.

I mention these differences because terms are often intermixed incorrectly. People will say modem when it is really the integrated router they are talking about. Or they say router when it is really the integrated WAP. So we really need to be talking about the "function" as well as the device, and not get them mixed up.
My speed connection is 120/20 Mb/s, so wifi 5 gonna provide all speed, but I was seaching WiFI 6 have better latency and less interference. So my problem isn't the speed, I just want to know if the modem(which wave integrated WAP WIFI 5) internet connected in the extender for a cable(Ethenet), When the internet come in extender, It will use this benefits(better latency, less interference) of the WIFI 6.
 
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Seems to me an extender halves the possible bandwidth since it listens and talks on the same frequency
Ummm, no. That's not how it works. You are describing the "simplex" mode of radio communications. It is why, way back in the golden olden days, radio operators had to say "over" when they were done talking. This told the distant end it was their turn to now "key the mic" and start talking.

Then "duplex" mode was created to allow transmitting and receiving at the same time on the same frequency.

That said, extenders do degrade performance significantly because they are relays (or "hop"). The distant computer transmits to the extender. The extender receives that data on one side, then hands it off to the other side and transmit it to the wireless router. In other words, the extender becomes a "man in the middle". And a "man in the middle" always cost you something - whether it be time or money or both.
 
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Then "duplex" mode was created to allow transmitting and receiving at the same time on the same frequency.
How does that work given that the volume of transmission is so much louder than receiving.

Does Wifi Extender Slow Down Internet | Helpful Guide - Digitalgreenfox
  1. "The range extender will have to split its bandwidth between interacting with your router and interacting with your connected devices. So basically, you are only using 1/2 of the bandwidth."
 
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You are not interpreting that correctly. Splitting "its" (as in the extender device) bandwidth is not the same thing as splitting the bandwidth of the network.

That is just saying what I said above. It takes time for a device in the middle to receive data then hand it over to the transmitter side.

Louder? Its not audio.

Of course the "signal strength" of the transmitted signal is much higher than what is received. This is because it transmits out in all (omni) directions so only a tiny amount is received on the receiver end. If it used pinpoint directional antennas (like microwave towers), it would still take the same amount of time. It is just that the transmitter would not need to be so powerful because nearly all the signal strength would be concentrated into a very narrow "beam".

But radio waves, regardless their signal strength, still travel at the speed of light. And the information (the data or "intelligence) is the same, regardless if being transmitted or received.
 
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diogoBRRN

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Ummm, no. That's not how it works. You are describing the "simplex" mode of radio communications. It is why, way back in the golden olden days, radio operators had to say "over" when they were done talking. This told the distant end it was their turn to now "key the mic" and start talking.

Then "duplex" mode was created to allow transmitting and receiving at the same time on the same frequency.

That said, extenders do degrade performance significantly because they are relays (or "hop"). The distant computer transmits to the extender. The extender receives that data on one side, then hands it off to the other side and transmit it to the wireless router. In other words, the extender becomes a "man in the middle". And a "man in the middle" always cost you something - whether it be time or money or both.
This holp a lot Buddy, thank you!
 
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Sure. No problem.
 
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But radio waves, regardless their signal strength, still travel at the speed of light. And the information (the data or "intelligence) is the same, regardless if being transmitted or received.
But one can't hear while one is transmitting.

Louder? Its not audio.
Yes, I know its not audio, in case you don't like my use of hear above.
 
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But one can't hear while one is transmitting.
We are getting OT here so I will say this and move on - in simplex mode, you are right, you can't hear (receive) while transmitting. In duplex mode, you can.

But that's with Point A to Point B radio communication.

This is about wifi extensions or radio relay - which is NOT Point A to Point B.

Wifi extension is Point A to Relay to Point B. The Relay device can received from Point A at the same time it is transmitting to Point B.
 
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My point was how to avoid simplex and achieve duplex, which I believe is very much on topic for relay.
 
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My point was how to avoid simplex and achieve duplex, which I believe is very much on topic for relay.
Typical wifi between two nodes works on in half-duplex mode. Wifi extenders/repeaters can transmit downstream and receive from upstream at the same time. For full duplex using extenders, one must use one of the latest "mesh" networks.

Ethernet is full duplex.
 
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