Thursday, January 28th 2010

Matrox Unveils Multiple Graphics eXpansion Module Support, Drives Even More Displays

Matrox Graphics Inc., the leading manufacturer of specialized graphics solutions, today announced multiple DualHead2Go and TripleHead2Go Graphics eXpansion Module (GXM) support to drive up to four or six monitors, respectively, from a single system. A second GXM can now be connected to the secondary output of a supported dual monitor graphics card so two DualHead2Go GXMs can power up to four outputs in 2x2 or 4x1 modes, while two TripleHead2Go units can be combined to connect six displays to produce either a 3x2 or 6x1 set up.

"Multi-GXM support offers a tremendous amount of flexibility by simply having to connect the GXMs externally to your system or workstation," says Ron Berty, Business Development Manager, Matrox Graphics. "Business professionals for example, can now conveniently upgrade to a four- or six-monitor workspace to run additional applications for real-time viewing. Additionally, AV specialists can effortlessly build six-screen presentation or digital signage platforms to drive dynamic, digital messaging while benefiting from the natural synchronization of the screens being driven by a single GPU."

Matrox currently offers multi-GXM support with the 2.06 (or above) GXM software suite. A maximum of two GXMs—of the same make and model—can be connected to a supported graphics card with two available outputs of the required type. Multi-GXM stretched desktop mode is available with Matrox M-Series cards, while independent desktop support is available with supported M-Series, ATI, and NVIDIA graphics cards. For complete details, visit the Multi-GXM page.

Matrox partners will be showcasing this technology, alongside a wide range of Matrox digital signage graphics solutions, at Integrated Systems Europe 2010, RAI, Netherlands, from February 2-4.

Availability and Pricing
Matrox Graphics eXpansion Modules are available for purchase from authorized resellers worldwide, or in North America and Europe, directly from ShopMatrox.com.
  • Matrox DualHead2Go Analog Edition – Part number: D2G-A2A-IF
  • Matrox DualHead2Go Digital Edition – Part number: D2G-A2D-IF
  • Matrox DualHead2Go DP Edition – Part number: D2G-DP-IF
  • Matrox TripleHead2Go Digital Edition – Part number: T2G-D3D-IF
  • Matrox TripleHead2Go DP Edition – Part number: T2G-DP-IF
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19 Comments on Matrox Unveils Multiple Graphics eXpansion Module Support, Drives Even More Displays

#1
TotalChaos
For the price they want for the Display Port models I cant see many selling. $350 for triple 1280x1024 is too much IMHO
Posted on Reply
#2
Mistral
So... With 12 TripleHead2Go and an ATi Cypress you can get 36 screens connected to your PC? Awesomeauce!!1!

/s
Posted on Reply
#3
MK4512
3x2?

Really? Who the hell needs 6 screens!?
Posted on Reply
#4
assaulter_99
by: MK4512
3x2?

Really? Who the hell needs 6 screens!?
I can't even afford 2 screens! You really have to fork it out if you want to keep in touch these days! :laugh:
Posted on Reply
#5
DanTheBanjoman
Señor Moderator
by: MK4512
3x2?

Really? Who the hell needs 6 screens!?
They function as a single screen. Just google "video wall" and you'll find many application.
Posted on Reply
#6
OneCool
But will it play Crysis!!!!!!!!
Posted on Reply
#7
Jizzler
A number of things... I ran 3 x 19" a couple jobs ago when doing web development work, with the 4th output connected a projector.

Would have loved a couple more.. but that have been pushing it (needed to get everyone else up to duals first) :D
Posted on Reply
#8
assaulter_99
by: OneCool
But will it play Crysis!!!!!!!!
This joke is overused, over-abused! :roll:
Posted on Reply
#9
FreedomEclipse
~Technological Technocrat~
People seem to forget that Matrox dont make hardware targeted towards regular or enthusiast market.

stuff like this will more then likely end up in security control rooms, stock traders desks (the people who stare at bloomberg all day) & lastly graphic designers but I think even graphic designers will struggle to find use for all 6 screens, though Im not saying they cant. & lastly maybe somewhere else in the media industry but I think not - Usually 2 monitors will suffice for most applications before the product hits commercial use & at that price, the mainstream people that cant afford it. but hell if you got money to waste & want a bigger E-Penis by all means go ahead
Posted on Reply
#10
[H]@RD5TUFF
by: MK4512
3x2?

Really? Who the hell needs 6 screens!?
My work station at work in the IT lab, I am using 7 monitors, but not all by 1 machine, but 7 monitors all the same.
Posted on Reply
#11
PP Mguire
Now wheres that Matrox ISA card i had laying around here.....oh wait...its in the trash.

I had no idea Matrox was even still around. Lol my friend always said theyd beat 3dfx. Seems i owe him 20 bucks.
Posted on Reply
#12
FreedomEclipse
~Technological Technocrat~
by: PP Mguire
Now wheres that Matrox ISA card i had laying around here.....oh wait...its in the trash.

I had no idea Matrox was even still around. Lol my friend always said theyd beat 3dfx. Seems i owe him 20 bucks.
Matrox Graphics specializes in professional multi-display video cards that enable more than one monitor to be driven by a single card. The targeted user-base for Matrox video cards largely consists of 2D, 3D, video, scientific, medical, military and financial workstation users.

During the 1990s, Matrox's "Millennium" line of video cards were noted for their exceptional 2D speed and visual quality. They had a wide following among users willing to pay for a higher quality and sharper display. In 1994 they introduced the Matrox Impression, an add-on card that worked in conjunction with a Millennium card to provide 3D acceleration. The Impression was aimed primarily at the CAD market and failed to make much of an impression on the rapidly emerging 3D gaming market. A later version of the Millennium included features similar to the Impression, but lagged behind emerging vendors like 3dfx Interactive.

Matrox made several attempts to regain a foothold in the market that was increasingly dominated by 3D-capable cards. The Matrox Mystique, released in 1996, was their first attempt to make a card with good gaming performance and pricing suitable for that market. A number of design decisions resulted in good 3D performance but poor quality 3D images, while the 2D support remained excellent. Matrox nevertheless made bold performance claims for the Mystique, but was widely derided in reviews as offering performance nowhere near the contemporary Voodoo1.

A refresh started with the short-lived G100, which was quickly replaced by the Matrox G200. The G200 was sold as two models, the Millennium G200 was a higher-end version typically equipped with 8 MB SGRAM memory, while the Mystique G200 used slower SDRAM memory but added a TV-out port. The G200 offered competent 3D performance for the first time, but was released shortly before a new generation of cards from Nvidia and ATI completely outperformed it. Later versions in the Matrox G400 series were never able to regain the crown, and despite huge claims for the Matrox Parhelia, their performance continued to be quickly outpaced by the major players.

Since then, Matrox has continued to shift the focus of its card designs towards specialized, niche markets, moving more deeply into enterprise, industrial, and government applications. In recent years they have held no more than a 3–5% share of the total video card market. Matrox is now divided in three divisions: Matrox Graphics, Matrox Video, and Matrox Imaging. Matrox Graphics is the primary consumer and end-user brand, while Matrox Video markets digital video editing solutions, and Matrox Imaging sells high-end video capture systems and "smart cameras", video cameras with a built-in computer for machine vision applications.
they got pwnd -so their sticking to what they do best.
Posted on Reply
#13
PP Mguire
Well by beat 3dfx i mean stay in business through the coming of ATI and Nvidia dominance. We see where the market stands, so i owe him 20 bucks :laugh:
Posted on Reply
#14
my_name_is_earl
They forgot to add one important feature. One touch fall over.
Posted on Reply
#15
FreedomEclipse
~Technological Technocrat~
by: my_name_is_earl
They forgot to add one important feature. One touch fall over.
yeah that stand does look a little small lol - its like if micheal Jordan had size 4 feet
Posted on Reply
#17

by: hayder.master
i think ATI still best chose for this
If you're talking about upcoming Eyefinity 6, then everything depends on the price...
#18
btarunr
Editor & Senior Moderator
by: OneCool
But will it play Crysis!!!!!!!!
Yes.
Posted on Reply
#19

by: btarunr
Yes.
Somehow I doubt that... :nutkick::eek:
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