Thursday, January 6th 2011

TRENDnet Demonstrates the 500Mbps Powerline Adapter with Bonus Outlet

TRENDnet, a best-in-class wired and wireless networking hardware brand, today from CES demonstrates the 500 Mbps Powerline AV Adapter with Bonus Outlet, model TPL-402E, and the 500Mbps Powerline AV Adapter with Bonus Outlet Kit, model TPL-402E2K. Each device features a built in electrical outlet and embedded power saving technology, which reduces power consumption by up to 70% in standby mode.

The 500Mbps Powerline AV Adapter with Bonus Outlet creates a secure high speed building-wide network from any electrical outlet. When the TPL-402E is plugged in, consumers don't lose the use of an outlet-an additional electrical socket is built into the front of the adapter. Connect one adapter to your network, and plug another adapter into any outlet on your electrical system for instant high speed network access. Connect adapters quickly using the convenient one-touch connect button. Install up to sixteen Powerline adapters in different rooms for building wide networking.

Products such as coffee makers, washing machines, microwaves, vacuums, and other household appliances create electrical power spikes. An advanced electrical noise filter maintains high performance signal strength, thereby significantly boosting performance. LED displays convey device status for easy power management and troubleshooting. Advanced AES encryption secures your network.

The 500Mbps Powerline AV Adapter with Bonus Outlet, model TPL-402E, comes with a three year limited warranty and will be available from TRENDnet's online and retail partners in March. The MSRP for the TPL-402E is US $99.99.

The 500Mbps Powerline AV Adapter Kit with Bonus Outlet, model TPL-402E2K, comes with two TPL-402E units and a three year limited warranty. The TPL-402E2K will be available from TRENDnet's online and retail partners in March. The MSRP for the TPL-402E2K is US $179.99.
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11 Comments on TRENDnet Demonstrates the 500Mbps Powerline Adapter with Bonus Outlet

#1

We needs some review of this/those...Sound really interesting this concept.
#2
SetsunaFZero
by: btarunr

Products such as coffee makers, washing machines, microwaves, vacuums, and other household appliances create electrical power spikes. An advanced electrical noise filter maintains high performance signal strength, thereby significantly boosting performance. LED displays convey device status for easy power management and troubleshooting. Advanced AES encryption secures your network.
hope thats true. the msi powerline adapters that i bought last year rly sucks when machine with high power draw are used.
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#3
Mussels
Moderprator
by: TAViX
We needs some review of this/those...Sound really interesting this concept.
its old tech by now. these are just faster.



it suffers many of the same limitations as wireless regarding bandwidth - its a shared pool, so the more devices there are the slower it gets.


it also doesnt work in every house/office, or if it does, at poor speeds sometimes due to interference/bad wiring.



they can be very, very useful in multistory buildings.
Posted on Reply
#4
Baum
if your place is rented these are great for saving hassle and radiation other than that noooo...

i had 6 85Mbit D-Lan Adapter from Devolo and 2 14Mbit in my house which worked for years very effectively, but only if no higher inductive load is added to their "shared" powerline.

just plug in something with a biger engine and crank it up, d-lan connection will go down due to transmitt errors going sky high :-(

and it is right that they get slower with each added but the also uses some sort of "swarm" technology as transfering files from 2 different sources to 2 different aims, involving 4 plugs won't interfere each other too much like using a 1:3 ratio, feels like their transmit stuff has headers that helps to withdraw some "packets" <- hope you get the point from my observation

still nice to see them around, i just hope they don't affect security of energy supplies...

i removed and sold them all for cat6e and a 16-port patchpanel+switch
Posted on Reply
#5
timta2
And from what I've read you never really get the theoretical maximum. I wonder if you will even be able to achieve half of that 500 Mbps in a real world setting? I would like to read a review also.
Posted on Reply
#6
Gzero
by: timta2
And from what I've read you never really get the theoretical maximum. I wonder if you will even be able to achieve half of that 500 Mbps in a real world setting? I would like to read a review also.
If they are using the same labelling/marketing as before, then what they mean is that combined up/down is 500mbps, so max up and down is actually 250mbps in one direction.

Thats what my 200mbps 2.0's do, I reach around 6 to 7 megabytes in normal file transfers and more reliable than wireless with no packetloss (decent wiring in my house I guess).
Posted on Reply
#7

I think that 500Mbps is full duplex speed, meaning can do at the same time 500Mbps up and down. The thing is, due to overhead and stuff, the actual speed is about 80% of the theoretical top speed.
#8
Mussels
Moderprator
by: TAViX
I think that 500Mbps is full duplex speed, meaning can do at the same time 500Mbps up and down. The thing is, due to overhead and stuff, the actual speed is about 80% of the theoretical top speed.
so far, all of them follow the half in each direction rule. i've used many of them and many reviews and have never seen one breach that convention.


the ~20% overhead kicks in after that, so with these and all factors considered, you're only likely to get 200Mb speeds in each direction - which aint that bad really, it still tops out wireless N in many situations (remember that wifi follows the same half duplex advertising crap, so 300Mb N is more like 150, and 150 is more like 75)
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#9

hmmmmmmm.......that's not good at all if you are right. Because having more than 4 PC connected using this is not worth. And besides, with those money I have a feeling you can buy some decent 1Ggps switch...sorry I'm not sure of price...
#10
Gzero
by: TAViX
hmmmmmmm.......that's not good at all if you are right. Because having more than 4 PC connected using this is not worth. And besides, with those money I have a feeling you can buy some decent 1Ggps switch...sorry I'm not sure of price...
Then you completely misunderstand the point of these adapters.

They are not switches/routers. They simply fill the gap between your pc and the router, the same way Wifi does, except your using your electric lines rather than radio waves to create the connection between points. The advantage is just like Mussels stated:

by: Mussels


the ~20% overhead kicks in after that, so with these and all factors considered, you're only likely to get 200Mb speeds in each direction - which aint that bad really, it still tops out wireless N in many situations (remember that wifi follows the same half duplex advertising crap, so 300Mb N is more like 150, and 150 is more like 75)
Posted on Reply
#11
Easy Rhino
Linux Advocate
i have an old set of EOPL adapters i was graciously given. when they worked they worked very well. interference though was a huge problem so it constantly disconnected. i am hoping this tech continues to be developed.

note: if these are not expensive perhaps i will purchase them and do a review.
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