Monday, May 30th 2011

Corsair Announces New Hydro Series Liquid CPU Coolers

Corsair, a worldwide designer and supplier of high-performance components to the PC gaming hardware market, today announced two new models in its award-winning Hydro Series™ family of high-performance liquid CPU coolers.

The Hydro Series H80 and H100 feature the latest cooling performance technology, simple installation, and maintenance-free operation. Both include a low-profile, light-weight cooling unit with a micro-channel copper cold plate and a split-flow manifold for superior cooling, and digital fan control, allowing the user to select between low-noise, balanced, and maximum cooling modes. The H80 includes a double-thick 120mm radiator for compatibility with virtually all standard ATX PC cases. The top-of-the-line H100 uses a dual 120mm radiator for even better performance, and is compatible with PC cases that provide mounting capability for a standard 240mm radiator.

Both the H80 and H100 include a Corsair Link digital connector, allowing them to take full advantage of the new Corsair Link system for monitoring and control. For systems with the Corsair Link Commander hardware installed, users have even more control of cooling performance and sound levels.

"With the H80 and H100, we've kept our focus on the key features that have made the Hydro Series a success — closed-loop reliability, straightforward installation, and, of course, the best CPU cooling technology available." said Ruben Mookerjee, VP and General Manager for Components at Corsair. "The user-selectable fan control and Corsair Link Digital compatibility gives performance enthusiasts the power to customize their cooling performance and manage fan noise by selecting the amount of cooling they need."

The Hydro Series H80 and H100 will be available from Corsair-authorized retailers worldwide in June. The Hydro Series H80 will be available for a US suggested retail price of $109 USD, and the Hydro Series H100 will be available for a US suggested retail price of $119 USD. For more information on the complete line of Hydro Series liquid CPU coolers, please visit the Corsair web site.
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23 Comments on Corsair Announces New Hydro Series Liquid CPU Coolers

#2
ERazer
thats wat im talking about! love it :toast:

ill take the h100!
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#3
SlayerJC
Oh God. I can't wait to see reviews.
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#4
theJesus
These prices are much more reasonable than what we previously saw here (~$154 and ~$173). Now they're actually worth considering :laugh:
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#5
LAN_deRf_HA
This is crap design. A new product should never move backwards in any regard, these do in appearance. The simple chrome sticker was rather excellent, caught any case lighting quite well. This looks like plasticy junk. It's too "busy" on the face.
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#6
15th Warlock
So, what's the difference between the H80 and the H70 besides the square heatsink/pump? The Corsair Link thingy only?
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#7
jalex3
I personaly will stick with air or just go water. not fond of these all in ones
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#8
fr500
by: jalex3
I personaly will stick with air or just go water. not fond of these all in ones
This is water not all in one or anything.... All water systems have a RAD + fans and a water loop. Thus watercooling = waterblock for CPU + Pump + Air cooling for the fluids
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#9
Sihastru
The H100 does look interesting, and might be the first closed loop water cooling system that deserves any attention. I hope they will go for "whoosh quiet" this time and not for "airplane engine quiet"...
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#10
RejZoR
Nice. Corsair is really pushing the water cooling kits segment. Now i just wish they release few Hydro coolers for graphic cards. Preferably with such where they somehow also give option to cool VRM with water. Not sure how they could do this in a generic way but i guess it's possible. Maybe with extra cooling plates that you can attach to the block or something.
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#11
theJesus
by: RejZoR
Nice. Corsair is really pushing the water cooling kits segment. Now i just wish they release few Hydro coolers for graphic cards. Preferably with such where they somehow also give option to cool VRM with water. Not sure how they could do this in a generic way but i guess it's possible. Maybe with extra cooling plates that you can attach to the block or something.
I've actually thought about buying one of these CPU coolers and forcing it to fit on my GPU, then cutting up the graphics card cooler to fit around it and cool everything else. No friggin' idea how well it would work, but it would be pretty fun to try out if I could find one of these all-in-one loops for ~$50 :laugh:
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#12
sneekypeet
Unpaid Babysitter
by: RejZoR
Nice. Corsair is really pushing the water cooling kits segment. Now i just wish they release few Hydro coolers for graphic cards. Preferably with such where they somehow also give option to cool VRM with water. Not sure how they could do this in a generic way but i guess it's possible. Maybe with extra cooling plates that you can attach to the block or something.
CoolIt tried it and it was very near $200. It had limited full coverage support and the idea I think fizzled due to the cost alone.

@ Jesus, look on the web man, there are a few GPU mods from H50's out there;)
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#13
theJesus
by: sneekypeet
CoolIt tried it and it was very near $200. It had limited full coverage support and the idea I think fizzled due to the cost alone.

@ Jesus, look on the web man, there are a few GPU mods from H50's out there;)
Yeah, I remember seeing those from CoolIT and thought they were cool but too expensive. Thanks for the tip, I'll start looking around.
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#15
cadaveca
My name is Dave
The one thing all these coolers are missing is a user-accessible fill port. My H50 and H70 both "slosh" at startup, due to air trapped inside.
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#16
sneekypeet
Unpaid Babysitter
by: cadaveca
The one thing all these coolers are missing is a user-accessible fill port. My H50 and H70 both "slosh" at startup, due to air trapped inside.
But...but...then it isn't a sealed, zero maintenance system:p :D
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#17
cadaveca
My name is Dave
Sure, sure, but I think things like environmental factors, weren't considered during the design process. Why do all of these H-series coolers I've had have what seems to be HUGE air bubbles? We're talking 8 units now, all the same thing. Maybe they just need to top the coolant a bit more :laugh:
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#18
sneekypeet
Unpaid Babysitter
Cant argue that, but its much faster to say leave it 10ml short and not have spillage as the plate goes on?
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#19
cadaveca
My name is Dave
Yeah. Faster. Great. that's what I want with my hardware...rushed assembly.


Of course, maybe that's just how it is, and they assume most bubbles will get trapped in the tubing ribs. Of course, I swap my cooler around fairly often, so I'd notice things like that more often than someone with a permanent install, but whatever.

K. Smoke's done now, now I really gotta get back to work. lulz.
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#20
Strider
When I did my recent cooling upgrade to handle the OC on my 1090T, I looked into several different solutions. Everything from the Corsair Hydro series, ChillTEC Thermoelectric, Noctua NH-D14, and others.

One thing I noticed with the liquid coolers, such as the Hydro from Corsair, is there is no margin for error. They are good cooling solutions, as long as they don't fail. If the liquid stops flowing, the cooler looses almost all of its thermal conductivity. Not something I want to risk when its cooling my hardware. The more parts you introduce into a system, the more there is to fail.

So I decided to not go with a Hydro. The thermoelectric coolers are kinda nice, at least if they fail, the cooler can still maintain a diminished level thermal conductivity and hopefully stop your processor from frying if its under a heavy OC. However I again, did not want a setup that could fail and then end up with condensation in my case dripping onto my hardware. Since these coolers cool well under room temperature.

In my opinion, unless you are going full board liquid cooling across the board, you're better off with high-end air cooling. Something like the Noctua NH-D14, or if you don't want to drop $90 on an air cooler. The Thermaltake Frio is a fantastic cooler for around $50, this is what I went with for my system. Both of these coolers, and others like them, often offer a comparable level of cooling when compared to the stand-alone closed system liquid coolers out there like the Hydro. Not to mention, there is nothing to fail but a fan, and most all of the high-end air coolers are push pull setups. A fan failure is not only easily more noticeable without monitoring software, since most of the time you can physically see and/or hear it, there is almost always a second fan there to keel it cool. The risk to your hardware is significantly reduced. Also, in most cases, the degree of cooling difference between these Hydro coolers and the high-end air coolers is negligible.

If you are on an even tighter budget, you can even look into the Cooler Master Hyper 212, for what you pay for this thing, it performs amazingly well. I have used it builds and it's a fantastic low cost choice for good quality air cooling.

Thats my opinion on it all anyway. One that I have formed over several years and multiple builds using all of these cooling solutions. Do I think these are somehow "bad" coolers? Not in any way, they are just not for me since I can't see the point or justify the risk. They do indeed work and are nice coolers, I will just stick with high-end air.

;)
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#21
LAN_deRf_HA
Anyone see this? Looks like it might actually perform well. As I recall tube diameter was one of the most beneficial mods you could do to a H50. Not sure why corsair hasn't taken the hint yet, but this doesn't look like it'll have that issue.

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#22
DoomDoomDoom
Me want reviews. Me want new toy.

Don't get me wrong, this CM 212+ is great, but pushing for big-boy numbers can be a hassle. Would love to take a step with one of these, and use those tubing holes on the back of my CM690 II. :D
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#23
theJesus
But then you have to take the unit apart and put it back together which completely defeats the purpose of having a sealed loop in the first place lol
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