Wednesday, July 6th 2011

ADATA Leads the Industry with Gaming-Grade 8 GB DDR3L-1333 MHz Memory Module

ADATA Technology, a leading manufacturer of high-performance DRAM modules and NAND Flash application products, announced its latest product offering aimed at satisfying the needs of extreme gamers. In an industry first, the company has launched the single 8GB XPG Gaming Series DDR3L 1333G Desktop overclocking memory. With a high density of 8GB and low voltage of only 1.35V, it is anticipated to provide excellent system performance and overclocking capabilities to meet the requirements of power users and overclockers.

ADATA DRAM product planning department project manager Alex Wu explained, “With the popularity of 64-bit operating systems, high-density memory is a prerequisite in many gamers’ minds. We are the first to launch DDR3L 1333G high-density 8GB memory modules, achieved in the XPG Gaming Series”. He further stated: “This product adopts a 1.35 volt design, to offer gamers excellent stability and efficiency and also reduce waste heat and power consumption costs”. The XPG Gaming Series DDR3L 1333G desktop overclocking memory features high density and low voltage, helping gamers achieve the ultimate in system effectiveness. At the same time, the reduced power consumption leads to lower carbon emissions, resulting in greater environmental sustainability.

The XPG Gaming Series DDR3L 1333G overclocking memory uses 9-9-9-24 latency timing, and adheres to the performance and compatibility standards that ADATA memory products are known for. Its production processes are compliant with JEDEC specifications, and all memory chips used undergo a rigorous screening process. The use of high-quality circuit boards and aluminum heat sinks effectively reduces the module operating temperature, significantly extending the working life of the memory. The product is available in high-density 8GB and dual-kit 16GB package.

Availability
The new DDR3L 1333G new XPG Gaming series desktop overclocking memory modules will be distributed through select agents and distributors. For related product information, visit the product page.
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28 Comments on ADATA Leads the Industry with Gaming-Grade 8 GB DDR3L-1333 MHz Memory Module

#1
Zubasa
Gaming Grade aka nothing special.
Kids, don't do A-Data, its bad for you.
Posted on Reply
#2
ironwolf
by: Zubasa
Kids, don't do A-Data, its bad for you.
Rubbish. A-Data makes great memory, only time I get any back is when customers upgrade to more RAM, etc. Out of hundreds sold this year alone, never sent a single back.
Posted on Reply
#3
arterius2
I'll tell you what is rubbish - ADATA, first sign of a red flag is when a company tries too hard to market something that is not. 1333MhzCL9, really? high performance memory? Ooooookk... guess I'll throw out my 2000mhzCL8 "non-gaming grade" memory and replace them with ADATA-certified "gaming-grade" memories, because obviously, we are going to notice huge performance improvements, NOT.

ADATA is just bunch of bollocks who have to resort to gimmicks to trick uninformed consumers into buying their products.
Posted on Reply
#4
JATownes
I think you all are missing the point. These are not made to be extremely high performance DIMMs. What makes these special is that they operate at 1.35v, hence the "L" in the name. This is a single 8GB stick of DDR3 1333Mhz CAS9 at 1.35v. I assume these will overclock pretty well with a little more voltage.

Does anyone know of any other RAM that runs standard at 1.35v? I can't seem to find any.
Posted on Reply
#5
arterius2
by: JATownes
I think you all are missing the point. These are not made to be extremely high performance DIMMs. What makes these special is that they operate at 1.35v, hence the "L" in the name. This is a single 8GB stick of DDR3 1333Mhz CAS9 at 1.35v. I assume these will overclock pretty well with a little more voltage.

Does anyone know of any other RAM that runs standard at 1.35v? I can't seem to find any.
LMAO.. there are plenty, you really need to do more research mate. look at my specs, I currently run G.Skill Sniper at 1.25v 1600mhz, right out of the package, it has been out for a year, 1.35v is nothing special, several brands already offer low-voltage solutions months ago, and they call for for what it is - "Eco Memory" "Low Voltage Memory" "Green Memory" "Cool Memory" etc, they don't stick gimmick tags such as "Extremely High Performance, Gaming Grade, or Power User" to something that performs at the lowest DDR3 speed currently with highest latency.

also, low-voltage memories are horrible at overclocking, you would know this if you read reviews about several low-voltage around the web, you can maybe squeeze a few mhz out of it, but have to dial up the latency several clocks, so in the end it's actually worse than factory setting.

Also, it is a KNOWN fact (that 1600 or 2000 mhz memories offer noticeable improvements to some games over the 1333 counterpart, especially on integrated graphic solution, such as AMD fusion, and Intel HD 2000/3000), so this is very irresponsible of A-Data to trick its uninformed customer base.

This is same logic as marketing a Ford Focus with 2.0L engine and call it an F1 Formula race car.
Posted on Reply
#6
JATownes
LMAO. You are still missing the point. It is an 8GB single DIMM. I know there are 1.35v ram out there, but they are all 2GB or 4GB sticks. I was wondering if anyone knows of a single 8GB stick that runs at 1.35v.with better timings/speeds than these. An 8GB stick with this speed/timings appears to be fairly rare, though I know there are a couple out there (Kingston ValueRAM for one).
Posted on Reply
#7
arterius2
by: JATownes
LMAO. You are still missing the point. It is an 8GB single DIMM. I know there are 1.35v ram out there, but they are all 2GB or 4GB sticks. I was wondering if anyone knows of a single 8GB stick that runs at 1.35v.with better timings/speeds than these. An 8GB stick with this speed/timings appears to be fairly rare, though I know there are a couple out there (Kingston ValueRAM for one).
yes, I understood you, but you are still missing my point. my point is about marketing gimmick, A-DATA specifically marketed this RAM as "extremely high performance" "Gamer-Grade", when clearly, this is a low-voltage solution for a more server/workstation based builds.

first off, gamers do not need 8GB single stick memory, these are for workstation and server usage, or any computer that deals with large media files, such as render farms and video editing machines. games are not memory intensive, 8GB dual channel kit (2x4gb), or 16GB (4x4gb) dual channel kit is more than enough for any gamer

Finally, to answer your question, this is what they should of marketed as (notice the date- 2010, this is nothing new my friend):
http://www.tcmagazine.com/tcm/news/hardware/31633/super-talent-offering-8gb-low-voltage-memory-servers

"Super Talent offering 8GB low-voltage memory for servers
Written by Cristian, 10 November 2010 - 08:57
Super Talent has now updated its server memory offer by releasing an 8GB DDR3 Registered-ECC memory module for Intel Westmere platforms which works at 1333 MHz with 9-9-9 latencies while powered at 1.35V.
"Going Green has always been associated with considerable trade-offs; not so with our new generation of 1.35v server memory. Our 8GB capacity boards enable higher capacity with higher efficiency and with a real measurable affect on operating costs," said CH LEE, Super Talent COO.
Super Talent's 8GB low-voltage RDIMM is now shipping."


there is no need to defend A-DATA, its just a typical Chinese company trying to squeeze a few extra bucks.
Posted on Reply
#8
Frick
Fishfaced Nincompoop
by: arterius2

there is no need to defend A-DATA, its just a typical Chinese company trying to squeeze a few extra bucks.
Is this a reason to hate them?
Posted on Reply
#9
scaminatrix
ADATA XPG™ Gaming Series memory products are made in conformation with JEDEC regulations and DDR3-1333 standards at CL value of 9-9-9-24 . Each XPG™ Gaming Series memory chip is selected through a strict filtering process, complete with high-quality PCBs (Printed Circuit Board) and an aluminum heat sink that effectively lowers module temperature, proven to reach a maximum speed of 2000MHz to make complete use of the computer’s power.
Ok, does that mean these sticks are very likely to hit 2000MHz?

http://www.adata.com.tw/index.php?action=product_feature&cid=5&piid=91
Posted on Reply
#10
arterius2
by: Frick
Is this a reason to hate them?
I do not "hate" any company(except for Apple, but thats a discussion for another day), there is no need for such strong flow of emotion. But I do notice ethical issues here, so I'm simply voicing my opinion. (which I hope is still within my right).
Posted on Reply
#11
Arctucas
by: Frick
Is this a reason to hate them?
No more so than G.Skill, a Taiwanese company.
Posted on Reply
#12
arterius2
by: scaminatrix
Ok, does that mean these sticks are very likely to hit 2000MHz?

http://www.adata.com.tw/index.php?action=product_feature&cid=5&piid=91
ok before you come in here with random quotes with no sources to back up, where is proof? I don't see any proof. I suggest you read several reviews on the current low voltage memory modules, and their ability to OC, you will notice that they in fact, OC quite poorly, and until I see ACTUAL PROOF that these will OC right up to 2000mhz, my point still stands.
Posted on Reply
#13
Zubasa
by: ironwolf
Rubbish. A-Data makes great memory, only time I get any back is when customers upgrade to more RAM, etc. Out of hundreds sold this year alone, never sent a single back.
A-Data memory do have more compatibility issues than other brands.
They work "great" when they are compatible, but when they are not you get random BSODs on first boots in the morning :shadedshu

Motherboard manufacturers particularly Gigabyte have released many bios trying to improve memory compatibility to A-Data.
I wouldn't exactly call it great. This have to do with A-Data switching memory chips all the time, even on the exactly same model different batches can have different chips.
Posted on Reply
#14
Frick
Fishfaced Nincompoop
by: arterius2
ok before you come in here with random quotes with no sources to back up, where is proof? I don't see any proof. I suggest you read several reviews on the current low voltage memory modules, and their ability to OC, you will notice that they in fact, OC quite poorly, and until I see ACTUAL PROOF that these will OC right up to 2000mhz, my point still stands.
That's marketing from the ADATA website. No sources there either but still a bold claim.

by: Zubasa
A-Data memory do have more compatibility issues than other brands.
They work "great" when they are compatible, but when they are not you get random BSODs on first boots in the morning :shadedshu
I wouldn't exactly call it great.
You have any further reading about this?
Posted on Reply
#15
JATownes
All companies market like this. I think this is still newsworthy. An 8GB DIMM 1333Mhz CAS9 @ 1.35 is extremely rare, especially being Non-ECC registered (cheaper).

And I think Scam was posing a question, and I have the same question. The product page purports to show "All Gaming Grade" DIMMs will run @ 2000Mhz @ 1.65v. But who knows. Must wait for reviews.

Speaking of reviews, would you please link me to some low voltage memory overclocking showing poor results. This is the first I have heard of it, but would love some more reading material.
Posted on Reply
#16
Zubasa
by: Frick
You have any further reading about this?
I have actual first hand experience with A-Data memory, and particularly their Gaming Series ;)
It is not just me, my friend who custom builds PCs at his shop also get compatibility issues and seems particularly bad with Gigabyte boards for some reason.

Edit: It doesn't look good when I found out my older 2 modules have SPD data with fucked up clocks speed in them.
Have anyone ever seen clocks speeds of 609Mhz and 687Mhz in their memory's SPDs?
Those are under fields for Jedec timings and as far as I know Jedec never specified memory with those clock speeds.
Posted on Reply
#17
Frick
Fishfaced Nincompoop
by: Zubasa
I have actual first hand experience with A-Data memory, and particularly their Gaming Series ;)
It is not just me, my friend who custom builds PCs at his shop also get compatibility issues and seems particularly bad with Gigabyte boards for some reason.

Edit: It doesn't look good when I found out my older 2 modules have SPD data with fucked up clocks speed in them.
Have anyone ever seen clocks speeds of 609Mhz and 687Mhz in their memory's SPDs?
Those are under fields for Jedec timings and as far as I know Jedec never specified memory with those clock speeds.
Ok, that's 2 people. You deal a lot with them which improves things, but until I see some statistics I'm not convinced. Sorry, it's just the way the world goes. :(
Posted on Reply
#18
Zubasa
by: Frick
Ok, that's 2 people. You deal a lot with them which improves things, but until I see some statistics I'm not convinced. Sorry, it's just the way the world goes. :(
Yup only two people I know used their DDR3. (Others avoid them like a plague, only reason anyone picked them up was because they are cheap on this side of the world.)
My other friend used A-Data DDR2 1066 on his P45 build and got the same BSOD problems.
You are free to try your luck ;)
Posted on Reply
#19
arterius2
by: JATownes
All companies market like this. I think this is still newsworthy. An 8GB DIMM 1333Mhz CAS9 @ 1.35 is extremely rare, especially being Non-ECC registered (cheaper).

And I think Scam was posing a question, and I have the same question. The product page purports to show "All Gaming Grade" DIMMs will run @ 2000Mhz @ 1.65v. But who knows. Must wait for reviews.

Speaking of reviews, would you please link me to some low voltage memory overclocking showing poor results. This is the first I have heard of it, but would love some more reading material.
G.Skill SNIPER Series 1600MHz CL9 8GB Review
http://www.vortez.net/articles_pages/g_skill_sniper_series_1600mhz_cl9_8gb_review,3.html
"So to begin with I overclocked the kit. With the intention of pushing the memory frequency up to the first milestone - 1866MHz. It's always a good idea to loosen the CAS timings when overclocking so that nothing affects moving up to the specified frequency. So I slackened the timings to 10-10-10-28. Immediately I ran into problems, so I increased the voltage from 1.25v to 1.6v incase this was hindering the frequency increase. Sadly, although the Sniper kit did boot into Windows and some of the benchmarks did run. It wasn't stable and 3DMark 11 and SANDRA revealed instability. All of our previously tested Sandy Bridge kits managed to move up from 1600MHz to 1866MHz without any problem of stability.

The next objective was to modify the CAS timings at the stock memory frequency of 1600MHz. The idea here is to get the timings as tight as possible and the lowest ratings that I could settle on were 8-9-8-25 @ 1.5v. So I was able to move the kit down to CL8, with a slight modification to the voltage.

With the performance modifications being established I was then able to begin benchmarking. So the Sniper kit will be tested in CL8 and at CL9 (stock) ratings, sadly due to the stumbling block with overclocking we won't be able to test the kit with an uprated frequency setting. The results are on the proceeding pages. To summarise here are the settings we will be testing on the G Skill Sniper's:
Stock: 1600MHz 9-9-9-24 @ 1.25v
Tight: 1600MHz 8-9-8-25 @ 1.5v"
Kingston HyperX Lovo 1866MHz Low Voltage Memory Kit Review
http://www.eteknix.com/memory/kingston-hyperx-lovo-1866mhz-low-voltage-memory-kit-review-1313/page6
We were able to increase the memory from its stock speed of 1866MHz to 1938MHz. We made sure that the memory was ran as intended using the stock voltage and timings as we generally see a performance decrease by loosening the timings to gain extra speed.

The increased speed from the overclock didn't make a great amount of difference and in certain tests including write and copy we saw a decrease in performance showing that this memory is already at its peak performance.
Posted on Reply
#20
Frick
Fishfaced Nincompoop
by: Zubasa
Yup only two people used their DDR3.
My other friend used A-Data DDR2 1066 on his P45 build and got the same BSOD problems.
You are free to try your luck ;)
And now there's three people. We are probably closing in to a fraction of a fraction of a percent of the total userbase here!
Posted on Reply
#21
Zubasa
by: Frick
And now there's three people. We are probably closing in to a fraction of a fraction of a percent of the total userbase here!
Ooo. exclamation mark!
You mad Bro? :laugh:
Posted on Reply
#22
Frick
Fishfaced Nincompoop
by: Zubasa
Ooo. exclamation mark!
You mad Bro? :laugh:
Naah, I just want some real numbers before I abandon a company. ^^
Posted on Reply
#23
Zubasa
by: Frick
Naah, I just want some real numbers before I abandon a company. ^^
TBH there are more reputable brands out there, not much reason to go A-Data in the first place.
My post was original just a reply to the guy that says A-Data memory are great.
I wouldn't go as far as saying A-Data is crap, but they certainly aren't the best thing in the world by any means.

Edit: Maybe A-Data will make some kickass RAM some day, but right now not so.
I never told you to abandon A-Data forever anyways.
Posted on Reply
#24
scaminatrix
by: arterius2
ok before you come in here with random quotes with no sources to back up, where is proof? I don't see any proof. I suggest you read several reviews on the current low voltage memory modules, and their ability to OC, you will notice that they in fact, OC quite poorly, and until I see ACTUAL PROOF that these will OC right up to 2000mhz, my point still stands.
Ok, first off, don't accuse me of coming with random quotes. If you bothered to click the link in my post, you would have found the source. I was quoting info from A-DATA's site. I didn't claim there was proof, did I?

Second off, don't try and drag me into your agument. I was not replying to anyone in the thread, I was asking a general question.
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