Monday, July 18th 2011

Sandy Bridge-E Model Numbers, Clock Speeds Surface

Here are details of the first three models of Intel's "Sandy Bridge-E" Core i7 processors in the LGA2011 package. Some of these details were made public as early as mid-April. It was then analyzed that Intel was driving two distinct lines of LGA2011 client processors: Enthusiast and Performance, and within Performance, there were BClk multiplier-unlocked six-core, and locked quad-core chips. With the new series, Intel will move to the 3000 series of processor model numbering, indicating that the new processors will be part of Intel's 3rd generation Core processors, even though they're based on the Sandy Bridge architecture.

Before we move to the model numbers, here's a quick run up of the brand extenders. "X" denotes Extreme Edition, "K" denotes "Unlocked" (BClk multipler unlocked). Leading the pack will be Core i7-3960X Extreme Edition. This six-core (6 cores, 12 threads with HTT) chip has a nominal clock speed of 3.30 GHz, Turbo Boost speed of up to 3.90 GHz, and features the full 15 MB of L3 cache present on the Sandy Bridge-E silicon. Expect this chip to have a four figure price-tag.

Next up, is the Core i7-3930K, with 6 cores, 12 threads, a nominal clock speed of 3.20 GHz, and Turbo Boost speed of 3.80 GHz; but 12 MB of L3 cache compared to 15 MB on the Extreme Edition chip. This chip features an unlocked BClk multiplier, making overclocking it possible.

The most affordable LGA2011 chip will be Core i7-3820, with 4 cores, 8 threads, nominal clock speed of 3.60 GHz, Turbo speed of 3.90 GHz, and just 10 MB of L3 cache. Unlike the other two, this one has its BClk multiplier locked. All three models feature quad-channel DDR3 memory controllers, but it is likely that the lower-end models could also have lower DRAM multiplier limits. All three chips will have other features in common, including a PCI-Express 3.0 root complex that gives out two x16 links to drive graphics.Source: DonanimHaber
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124 Comments on Sandy Bridge-E Model Numbers, Clock Speeds Surface

#1
lukcic
neah...

wait....what's the TDP? Oh yes... 130W ?:confused:
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#2
pantherx12
Those 6 cores will be mad @ 5 ghz XD

Shame about price.
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#3
v2.0HeLLBRinGeR
Core i7-3820 is like the 920 for 1366, do anyone have any ideas how long it will take for the other basic models will come out? Like the 930/950/960/etc. for the 1366.
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#4
Lu(ky
Really doesn't matter because the i7-2600K 4/8 comes very close to a 980X 6/12 on benches, and not to mention the 2600K overclocks like mad compared to the 1366 platform.. If you are running a x58/1366 with a 920 don't waste your money on the 6 core just stay with your 4/8 tell you move to the new 1155 socket. Go to Anandtech and go to CPU bench and see for yourself.. :D
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#5
TheMailMan78
Banstick Dummy
by: btarunr
Expect this chip to have a four figure price-tag.
Remember a while back when you people said that even without AMD and the competition they bring we would never see four figured consumer CPU's again? Well there you go. Every fan of Intel better PRAY Bulldozer is a success if they ever want to afford a new CPU here in a few years.
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#6
razaron
The highest model of Intels new (sub?)architecture being the same price as the highest models of all their other architectures, how surprising...
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#7
TheLaughingMan
by: TheMailMan78
Remember a while back when you people said that even without AMD and the competition they bring we would never see four figured consumer CPU's again? Well there you go. Every fan of Intel better PRAY Bulldozer is a success if they ever want to afford a new CPU here in a few years.
Behold! A four figure price tag on a CPU: Intel Core i7-975 Extreme Edition Bloomfield 3.33G...

This is nothing new for Intel. I wouldn't be surprised is the bottom of these 3 is $800, the next one up is $950, and the top dog is $1100.
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#8
Anusha
just wondering if 2600K would be better than the 3820 because of its unlocked multiplier. i hope so. :)

probably the 6-core CPUs won't reach 2600k speeds when overclocked with reasonable Vcore; reasonable meaning below or at 1.35V. while 2600k might reach 4.8-5GHz with comfort, the Vcore required to get there is not comfortable at all. 4.8GHz needs 1.4V or more. 5GHz needing almost 1.5V. Of course people will get higher benchmark scores, and will run suicide runs just to show what they are capable of, but how many people will risk going past 1.35V for 24/7 operation with their $500-1000 CPUs is something to think about. Probably the 2500/2600K (OCed) will remain as the better gaming chip? Time will tell.
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#9
15th Warlock
by: TheMailMan78
Remember a while back when you people said that even without AMD and the competition they bring we would never see four figured consumer CPU's again? Well there you go. Every fan of Intel better PRAY Bulldozer is a success if they ever want to afford a new CPU here in a few years.
Extreme edition CPUs have been sold at four figure prices by retailers since the days of the Prescott Pentium IV, I don't see how it is any different now... :wtf:

Granted, I wouldn't buy one of these procs if there's more value and a better price to performance ratio in lower priced model offerings, which as noted in this article, will be plenty available :p

It's clear to me that this are going to be enthusiast parts, and socket 1155 parts will fill other price ranges.
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#10
devguy
So, I would expect many considering LGA2011 to be looking at the Core i7-3820, as the hex-cores will likely be outrageously expensive. But, will overclocking the Core i7-3820 be as difficult as overclocking the locked Core i7 2600? These Bclk locked cores with so much of the chipset integrated in make overclocking by the reference clock extremely difficult (Sandy Bridge, Brazos, Llano, etc).

If that's the case, I see people only opting for 2011 if they have the dough for a hex-core, or if they buy prebuilt and want the best they can get. Otherwise, the i5 2500k (and likely the FX series) will attract most of us overclockers.
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#11
Benetanegia
Yeah and AMD Athlon 64 FX series sold for 4 digits as well. The one with the fastest chip will always ask for as much as it can, if the performance advantage is enough. i.e having 2 or 3 chips that are "untouchable" by the competitor.
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#12
CDdude55
Crazy 4 TPU!!!
This should be a monstrous platform. And probably pretty expensive, but hey, those who can pay for the best, will.
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#13
Trackr
Nah.

I'm not upgrading for a hexacore.

Wake me up when they have octocores on S2011.
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#14
Pestilence
by: devguy
So, I would expect many considering LGA2011 to be looking at the Core i7-3820, as the hex-cores will likely be outrageously expensive. But, will overclocking the Core i7-3820 be as difficult as overclocking the locked Core i7 2600? These Bclk locked cores with so much of the chipset integrated in make overclocking by the reference clock extremely difficult (Sandy Bridge, Brazos, Llano, etc).

If that's the case, I see people only opting for 2011 if they have the dough for a hex-core, or if they buy prebuilt and want the best they can get. Otherwise, the i5 2500k (and likely the FX series) will attract most of us overclockers.
3820 is locked so no one will be buying it. Intel should have made it a k and sold it for 399
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#15
Millennium
I'm not at all interested in this platform. No value here. Going to be waiting for bulldozer and later ivy bridge s1155 :)
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#16
newfellow
by: TheLaughingMan
Behold! A four figure price tag on a CPU: Intel Core i7-975 Extreme Edition Bloomfield 3.33G...

This is nothing new for Intel. I wouldn't be surprised is the bottom of these 3 is $800, the next one up is $950, and the top dog is $1100.
got to just agree with this. It's just mafia actions intel is currently taking like before we will see high price and kill the old and new isn't exactly any better.
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#17
boogerlad
even if 3820 is multiplier locked, s2011 isn't bclk locked.
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#18
[H]@RD5TUFF
Wheres my 8 core chip :confused::wtf:, 12 threads is so 2010.
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#19
Pestilence
by: boogerlad
even if 3820 is multiplier locked, s2011 isn't bclk locked.
Yes it is. Bclk overclocking is dead. SB-E is just like SB. It routes everything through the BCLK
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#20
[H]@RD5TUFF
by: Pestilence
Yes it is. Bclk overclocking is dead. SB-E is just like SB. It routes everything through the BCLK
I would wait for a review of a hands on overclock before making that kind of claim.
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#21
Pestilence
by: [H]@RD5TUFF
I would wait for a review of a hands on overclock before making that kind of claim.


The "Limited Unlocked" in that chart means the turbo speed can be changed but if you must wait for a review its all good.
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#22
Jizzler
by: [H]@RD5TUFF
Wheres my 8 core chip :confused::wtf:, 12 threads is so 2010.
There will be LGA 2011 Xeons with 8 cores.
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#23
Pestilence
by: Jizzler
There will be LGA 2011 Xeons with 8 cores.
With locked Multi's :(
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#24
[H]@RD5TUFF
by: Jizzler
There will be LGA 2011 Xeons with 8 cores.
I was under the impression they would be out come Q2 2012, and not only in Xeon form but at K and X models.
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#25
Pestilence
Pulled from another forum. The source quotes 6 and 8 core processors for 2011 starting at 480+ Euro's. The quad's start out at 250 Euro.

480 Euro = 675.98 Usd
250 Euro = 352.07 Usd
Details of the first three Intel Sandy Bridge-E Processors have been revealed. The Sandy Bridge-E (LGA 2011) platform will replace the older LGA1366 Core i7 Processors. According to our previous roadmap details (here), Sandy Bridge-E will fall under “Extreme” and “Premium Performance” branding.


The “Extreme” variants will be 6-8 Core models with 480 €+ Price range while the Premium CPU’s will come with 4-6 Cores and fall somewhere near the 250 € price. Intel also plans to release 8-12 Core variants of Sandy Bridge-E Processors but those will be kept limited to Server usage until desktop release is required.

The Details reveal Core i7 3000 series badge for the new Sandy Bridge-E Processors which makes them the 3rd generation Core of the Sandy bridge Family. The Core i7 3960X Extreme Edition is a Six Core model with 12 threads and Hyper Threading Enabled with 15MB L3 Cache, It’ll be stock clocked at 3.30Ghz which can turbo upto 3.90Ghz.

Next up is the Core i7 3930K (Unlocked Multiplier) which is also a 6 Core variant with 12 threads with a clock speed 100mhz lesser than the i7 3960X of 3.20Ghz and turbo of 3.80Ghz. L3 Cache is also cut down to 12MB. Last up is the Core i7 3820 which is a premium usage oriented model 4 Cores and 8 threads, Stock speed of 3.60 which can turbo to 3.80Ghz and 10MB L3 Cache, Overclocking is limited because of locked multiplier.

All CPU’s will feature quad-channel DDR3 integrated memory controllers (IMCs), PCI-e 3.0 Compatibility and multiple x16 PCI-e lanes. More details on Intel’s Sandy Bridge-E CPU’s below:
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