Friday, November 4th 2011

MSI Micro-ATX LGA2011 X79MA-GD45 Motherboard Pictured

Here are the first pictures of MSI's socket LGA2011 motherboard in the micro-ATX form-factor. Earlier this week, we got to see through ASRock's X79 Extreme4-M that LGA2011 micro-ATX boards were indeed possible. Called the MSI X79MA-GD45 (MS-7738 V1.1), this board offers all the connectivity possible on a board with such a tight footprint. The LGA2011 socket is powered by a 9-phase VRM. It is wired to four DDR3 DIMM slots, two on either sides of the socket, powered by 2-phase VRM. Expansion slots include two each of PCI-Express 3.0 x16 and PCI-Express 2.0 x1. 2-way SLI and CrossFire are supported.

SATA connectivity includes two SATA 6 Gb/s (white), four SATA 3 Gb/s (black). There are no eSATA ports, but four USB 3.0, two on the rear panel, two by internal header, driven by Renesas-made controllers. The rest of the connectivity is fairly standard: 8+2 channel HD audio driven by Realtek ALC892 CODEC with optical and coaxial SPDIF outputs, single gigabit Ethernet driven by Realtek 8111E, and a number of USB 2.0 ports. One of the front-panel USB 2.0 headers is designed for charging portable devices even with the system shut down (yet plugged in). The board will be driven by UEFI firmware, we're getting to see some nifty features for overclockers such as voltage measurement points across a wide range of voltage domains.
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15 Comments on MSI Micro-ATX LGA2011 X79MA-GD45 Motherboard Pictured

#1
radrok
The layout is beautiful and wow there is no little annoying fan on the chipset heatsink :rockout:
fantastic!!
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#2
mediasorcerer
Boy, where getting absolutely spoiled for choice, looks good.
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#3
RejZoR
I wish they'd stop sticking flat surfaces over heatsinks...
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#4
brandonwh64
Addicted to Bacon and StarCrunches!!!
I still like ASRocks version better. :(
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#6
specks
by: RejZoR
I wish they'd stop sticking flat surfaces over heatsinks...
Yep. It just reduces the effective exposed surface area.
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#7
Jizzler
Screwdriver, pop it off, no more problem :)


Nice looking board. Though head to head, I'd probably end up with the ASRock posted earlier.
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#8
specks
by: Jizzler
Screwdriver, pop it off, no more problem :)


Nice looking board. Though head to head, I'd probably end up with the ASRock posted earlier.
A good way to kill a board :p
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#9
Jizzler
Can't be a good way as I haven't yet killed one ;)
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#10
Jstn7477
LGA 2011 looks so freakin massive and complex with 2 levers and reinforced fan mounting holes. I'd hate to get socket burn on one of those.
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#12
xaira
MSI somehow knows how i have grown to detest full atx boards

i wish they somehow knew that i dont enjoy burning my hand on the microscopic chipset heatsinks they have grown fond of...
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#13
Neuromancer
by: specks
Yep. It just reduces the effective exposed surface area.
Yes I pointed that out in a couple of reviews I have done. especially on ones where I had I had overheating problems while clocking. you cant just rip them off either they are really on there, and trying to pry them off with a screwdriver might dmage something if not void your warranty.
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#14
tigger
I'm the only one
Nice indeed, good layout and looks good.
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#15
AsRock
TPU addict
by: RejZoR
I wish they'd stop sticking flat surfaces over heatsinks...
I just take them off and store the piece if needed for warranty reasons

At least with MSI i noticed they just clip or slide on.
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