Tuesday, November 8th 2011

AMD 1090FX and 1070 Chipsets Disclosed, No PCI Express 3.0

AMD is fine-tuning its product development cycle to deliver a new processor architecture towards the end of each year, and a new chipset towards the beginning of one, maintaining platform compatibility and longevity. The company launched its socket AM3+ compliant 9-series chipset months ahead of its first-generation Bulldozer FX processor family, though it looks like in the year 2012 it will launch a new line of desktop chipset, in all likelihood it will precede the launch of second-generation Bulldozer (codenamed "Piledriver") processors.

In 2012, AMD chipset family will be led by the 10-series chipset. At the very top is AMD 1090FX northbridge, followed by 1070. 1090FX will be designed to give out two PCI-Express x16 links, which can then drive up to four graphics cards. The 1070, on the other hand, gives out just one x16 link, which can drive up to two graphics cards. AMD will scrap its present model of 990X and 970, in which the northbridge is essentially the same piece of silicon, with the 990X having lane switches and supporting CrossFireX. A big revelation here is that the 10-series chipset will not feature PCI Express Gen 3.0. We'd normally expect AMD to be at the forefront of supporting new technologies. If we remember, AMD 790FX was the first AMD platform chipset in the industry to feature PCI-Express 2.0. Also, it is highly likely that AMD's Radeon HD 7000 series graphics, which are slated for later this year, will support PCI-Express 3.0 interface.

On the upside, though, 10-series chipset will be backed by the new SB1050 southbridge, which outpaces Intel's 7-series chipset in terms of connectivity. To begin with, SB1050 will pack a massive 8-port SATA 6 Gb/s RAID controller. All ports will run support 6 Gb/s data-rate. The SB1050 will also integrate native USB 3.0 SuperSpeed controllers. They will also streamline inventory management for manufacturers, as the chipset will be compatible with existing processor platforms. Some industry sources we spoke to commented that PCI-Express 3.0 chipset support is unlikely till Piledriver processors start selling.Source: DonanimHaber
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38 Comments on AMD 1090FX and 1070 Chipsets Disclosed, No PCI Express 3.0

#1
Damn_Smooth
Sounds nice but I learned my lesson about buying an AMD board before the chip is released for it.
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#2
The Von Matrices
Sounds like it's the same northbridge as the 790/890/990 with a slightly tweaked southbridge. This rebranding of one chip is getting close to being as bad as nVidia and the one MCP that powered 19 different chipsets over 4 generations.
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#3
DrunkenMafia
not sure about the naming scheme, I mean cpus with the same model name as the chipsets would be confusing!!

And +1 for lesson learned with AMD - Never buy a chipset before CPU launch. Lol
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#4
btarunr
Editor & Senior Moderator
I think the new northbridge is built on 40 nm process. So it will run cooler with lower power draw. But yes, this is essentially the same silicon as 890FX/990FX. Can't say the same about 790FX, because with 890FX the ALink chipset bus got updated to 4 GB/s.
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#5
eidairaman1
now we just need a Stepped AMD FX Lineup or even Piledriver
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#6
MrMilli
by: btarunr
I think the new northbridge is built on 40 nm process. So it will run cooler with lower power draw. But yes, this is essentially the same silicon as 890FX/990FX. Can't say the same about 790FX, because with 890FX the ALink chipset bus got updated to 4 GB/s.
Well the upgrade to the ALink bus didn't happen thanks to the northbridge but thanks to the SB. The 790 NB already supported PCIE 2.0 but it's accompanying SB didn't. Since ALink is nothing more than a PCIE connection, you see where i'm getting at. So 790 & 890 where the same silicon and AMD has only upgraded the southbridge since then.
I think the reason why AMD is so reluctant to upgrade the NB is bc the next step for them would be to integrate a fully new NB into the CPU. So I guess all the (limited) resources are going into that.
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#7
cdawall
where the hell are my stars
by: btarunr
I think the new northbridge is built on 40 nm process. So it will run cooler with lower power draw. But yes, this is essentially the same silicon as 890FX/990FX. Can't say the same about 790FX, because with 890FX the ALink chipset bus got updated to 4 GB/s.
40nm won't make it run at a lower temp. Lower volts will but the package size makes zero difference in a heat equation.
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#8
Dr. Nick
If there's anything to look forward to, it's the new southbridge.

The plans for my current system involve 2 SSDs in RAID 0 and 4 HDDS in RAID 10, so I've maxed out my onboard SATA3 controller.
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#9
Recus
by: btarunr
If we remember, AMD 790FX was the first chipset in the industry to feature PCI-Express 2.0, ahead of even Intel and NVIDIA.
According to Wikipedia:
Intel X38 has been launched in 2007.09,
Nvidia 780a - 2008.05,
AMD 790X - 2007.11.

Posted on Reply
#10
btarunr
Editor & Senior Moderator
by: cdawall
40nm won't make it run at a lower temp. Lower volts will but the package size makes zero difference in a heat equation.
Yes it will. When you optically shrink a chip without affecting its transistor count, and downscale its voltage, it will result in lower temperatures.
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#11
heky
by: btarunr
If we remember, AMD 790FX was the first chipset in the industry to feature PCI-Express 2.0, ahead of even Intel and NVIDIA
Nope, x38 was the first chipset released with PCI-Express 2.0.
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#12
btarunr
Editor & Senior Moderator
by: Recus
According to Wikipedia:
Intel X38 has been launched in 2007.09,
Nvidia 780a - 2007.05,
AMD 790X - 2007.11.

http://i56.tinypic.com/2e1sp3m.gif
Intel X38 was launched in October 2007 (sources: Anandtech (pin pointed to the revised launch date, October 11 2007), and Intel ARK mentions it as Q4 2007 (September isn't part of Q4)).

NVIDIA 780a was launched in May 2008. Google it.

AMD 790FX was launched around the same time as X38. I concede Intel was ahead with X38. Let me fix that part.
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#13
NC37
Wasn't the 990 also a reworked 890?

Not impressed. Course I'll reserve final judgement till it actually ships.
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#14
nt300
by: NC37
Wasn't the 990 also a reworked 890?

Not impressed. Course I'll reserve final judgement till it actually ships.
The 890 was a reworked 790, but the 990 stands on it's own.
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#15
de.das.dude
Pro Indian Modder
i was confused. i thought it was the 1090 phenom :6.


anyhoo when do we expect this to kick into the market? with piledriver or with the revised bulldozer chips?
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#17
lastcalaveras
they should of just released a new revision of the southbridge and named it SB955 or call the new chipset 995FX
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#18
Steven B
that is kind of odd no? no PCI-E 3.0?

Thanks for bringing this to our attention btarunr
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#19
devguy
At least this shows a prolonging of the lifespan of AM3+. Many (myself included) thought that AMD was gonna try and move everything to FM2, until the recent leaked slides showing an AM3+ Piledriver.

But the lack of PCIe 3.0 seems disappointing. AMD can try and say we have dual 16x slots with the 1090FX to Intel's dual 8x slots, but the Ivy Bridge chipsets will have PCIe 3.0, so dual 8x 3.0 ~ dual 16x 2.0.
Posted on Reply
#20
btarunr
Editor & Senior Moderator
by: devguy
At least this shows a prolonging of the lifespan of AM3+. Many (myself included) thought that AMD was gonna try and move everything to FM2, until the recent leaked slides showing an AM3+ Piledriver.

But the lack of PCIe 3.0 seems disappointing. AMD can try and say we have dual 16x slots with the 1090FX to Intel's dual 8x slots, but the Ivy Bridge chipsets will have PCIe 3.0, so dual 8x 3.0 ~ dual 16x 2.0.
There's always a catch. "Trinity" as it's known, packs just two Piledriver modules (four "cores"). So imagine the CPU performance about 10~15% higher than FX-4000 series chips.
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#21
yogurt_21
by: btarunr
Yes it will. When you optically shrink a chip without affecting its transistor count, and downscale its voltage, it will result in lower temperatures.
since when have they not increased trasistors on each gen?

the best example of what cdwall was saying is 775 compared to 1366, lower nm, higher wattage and higher heat.

a die shrink doesn't equate to heat output most of the time these days.
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#22
phanbuey
What i want to know is when the next iteration of B.Dozie is coming out.

Something makes me feel like if they could tweak it a bit, then they would be able to do what they did with the Phenom to Phenom II rehash.
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#23
PopcornMachine
Very curious about the lack of PCIE 3.0. Don't think it really matters personally, but if they going to make GPUs that use it why not make motherboard chipsets that support it?

Not sure what is going on at AMD any more.
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#24
Damn_Smooth
by: PopcornMachine
Very curious about the lack of PCIE 3.0. Don't think it really matters personally, but if they going to make GPUs that use it why not make motherboard chipsets that support it?

Not sure what is going on at AMD any more.
I really don't think AMD knows what is going on at AMD anymore.
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#25
btarunr
Editor & Senior Moderator
by: yogurt_21
since when have they not increased trasistors on each gen?

the best example of what cdwall was saying is 775 compared to 1366, lower nm, higher wattage and higher heat.

a die shrink doesn't equate to heat output most of the time these days.
We're talking about AMD 790/890/990 northbridge chip here. The "gen" here didn't change, just the fab process. So it's an optical shrink. The transistor count is the same.

If you want an example of optical shrinks, don't look at Intel CPUs, look at NVIDIA GPUs. Clock-for-clock, G92b (55 nm) was cooler and drew less power than G92 (65 nm). There were no transistor count changes between them.
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