Wednesday, February 22nd 2012

Fedora Remix for Raspberry Pi Released

Developers at the Seneca College released a version of Fedora Remix ARM that's optimized for the Raspberry Pi. Fedora Remix is itself a lightweight version of the open-source Red Hat Linux derivative, which is now further optimized for this $25 self-contained hobby-kit computer. The new Fedora Remix variant fits in a 2 GB SD card that the Raspberry Pi boots from. By simply connecting a display to the HDMI port (1080p supported), a keyboard and a mouse to the two USB ports, Fedora Remix will lead you straight to user information screen, from where normal usage is a minute away, without needing any hardware configuration. The 2 GB SD card is left with some space for user data. Raspberry Pi with Fedora Remix works just like any desktop. In related news, the makers of Raspberry Pi announced that the first batch of these boards will be through QA testing by the 23rd, and out for shipping.

A video presentation of Fedora Remix for Raspberry Pi follows.

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16 Comments on Fedora Remix for Raspberry Pi Released

#1
Deadlyraver
The funniest thing is that I go to the Seneca campus that is responsible for these projects, Seneca@York.
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#2
AphexDreamer
Man I've been really looking forward to this. Can't wait to get one myself. I'll have an extra gaming computer and my Parents can use this for Netflix.
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#3
R_1
That board was too powerful for me. :) All that ARM11 stuff is so advanced . I will wait for ARM A8 at least. :p
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#4
Completely Bonkers
I wish they designed this so that an interface module could be easily attached. In fact, why not even have a whole bunch of them on the baseboard. With 5v signalling. So that I could network my washing machine, trainset, disco lights, central heating to the internets etc.
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#5
erocker
So they're available tomorrow?!! :)
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#6
btarunr
Editor & Senior Moderator
by: erocker
So they're available tomorrow?!! :)
They've been up for pre-order all this while, it's just that the very first batch of Raspberry Pis will head to shipping tomorrow.

These guys have enough expertise to go ahead and design a mini-ITX board. When that happens, I'm getting one.
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#7
KieranD
by: btarunr
They've been up for pre-order all this while, it's just that the very first batch of Raspberry Pis will head to shipping tomorrow.

These guys have enough expertise to go ahead and design a mini-ITX board. When that happens, I'm getting one.
Really? Ive been following the Rasberry Pi for a while now and i read they where going to be ready at the end of the February (i think 20th was production day or something like that). No plans for preorders either. Unless you know different, i mean i only read their website for details.

ITX cases are massive compared to the size of the Raspberry Pi. I wish like the Education unit it had its own case rather than just a bare board.

Demand is very high from what i can tell so ill likely never be able get one. Fedora is what they are recommending you use rather than the Debian install they provided.

EDIT: Ya i read right, it's first come first serve basis.
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#8
R_1
Well, I don't see any reason to use ARM11 SoC in a Pico-ITX board, where you can have OMAP3 (Cortex-A8) SoC in a watch : Motorola MotoACTV
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#9
erocker
by: R_1
Well, I don't see any reason to use ARM11 SoC in a Pico-ITX board, where you can have OMAP3 (Cortex-A8) SoC in a watch : Motorola MotoACTV
Because I can buy a Rasperry Pi for less than it costs to purchase just the wrist wrap for the MotoACTV. Price is the reason.. and connectivity.
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#10
R_1
If you are big enough , like Amazon, you can buy OMAP4 just for $7.
PS.
Connectivity vise OMAP SoC is a champion. I only want to imply, that there is 4 generation gap, between project Denver like ARM devices and Rasberry Pi.
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#11
DannibusX
$25? Fook, I'll play with one or two.
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#12
rangerone766
i'm a complete noob with what this does. but would it make a good do it yourself thin client? we need to replace all the thin clients at work, and it these would work. it could save the co. some money.
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#13
Frick
Fishfaced Nincompoop
by: Completely Bonkers
I wish they designed this so that an interface module could be easily attached. In fact, why not even have a whole bunch of them on the baseboard. With 5v signalling. So that I could network my washing machine, trainset, disco lights, central heating to the internets etc.
Agreed, but I figured this would be something for eventual future versions and/or hackers.
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#14
Deadlyraver
Guys, if you want, I can go over there and investigate further, I am a student there.....
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#15
Completely Bonkers
by: Deadlyraver
Guys, if you want, I can go over there and investigate further, I am a student there.....
Is that a rhetorical question? You should be over there already!
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#16
Deadlyraver
by: Completely Bonkers
Is that a rhetorical question? You should be over there already!
....I'll bring photos to prove it. See ya in the forums bro!
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