Thursday, March 1st 2012

Intel Confirms Ivy Bridge Core Processor Specifications

Intel confirmed specifications of what could be its entire 3rd Generation Core processor family, based on the "Ivy Bridge" silicon, slated for Q1~Q2, 2012. These include details of its desktop Core i7, Core i5 processor models, notebook Core i3, Core i5, Core i7, and their corresponding ULV variants, and so on. Specifications include model numbers, clock speeds, Turbo Boost 2.0 speeds, and basic features such as Built-in Visuals (integrated graphics), caches, HyperThreading, and fab process. These details are meant for retailers and distributors to update them on the upcoming product lineups, so they could fine-tune their inventories.

Notebook lineup details follow.

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37 Comments on Intel Confirms Ivy Bridge Core Processor Specifications

#1
NC37
So laptop models get nerfs in cache, speed, and cores...but, they get buffed in graphics and HT.

Yep, Intel views Trinity as a threat :D. Can't wait to see the laptops coming out in June. Hurray for competition!
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#2
mcloughj
I'm confused... they are keeping the model numbers the same? or am i missing something?
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#3
entropy13
by: mcloughj
I'm confused... they are keeping the model numbers the same? or am i missing something?
You're missing something. They just included the previous-generation models in the charts.
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#4
n-ster
3570K will be the new 2500K and the 3770K will be the new 2700K...

They are interesting and it sadly makes the 3820 slightly irrelevant
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#5
Shakur92
any news about the release date? is still set to 29 april for quad core desktop?
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#6
brandonwh64
Addicted to Bacon and StarCrunches!!!
I will be eyeing the 3770K if it beats out the 2600K in tests.
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#7
thematrix606
Is this all of the Ivy Bridge CPUs? No 6/8 core chips?

And a side question, for those who do not want the integrated video, isn't it just easier/cheaper to also produce chips without that? Does the integrated video cores have any impact when not being used for heat or even performance?
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#8
NHKS
by: thematrix606
Is this all of the Ivy Bridge CPUs? No 6/8 core chips?

And a side question, for those who do not want the integrated video, isn't it just easier/cheaper to also produce chips without that? Does the integrated video cores have any impact when not being used for heat or even performance?
As far as I know, 6/8 core versions of would be reserved for Ivy Bridge-E(expected late 2012-early 2013) without the integrated graphics unit and will come as i7's with different socket (LGA 2011).
Ivy Bridge(socket LGA 1155) is supposed to cater to the mainstream market and its whole purpose is to provide decent graphics performance without the need for a dedicated graphics card. Intel's integrated graphics may not able able to handle graphics-intensive games comfortably, but will satisfy the needs of the average home PC user or multimedia users (like basic gaming, video editing, transcoding,etc).
If you dont want an Ivy Bridge with integrated graphics, Sandy Bridge-E(current) (or) Ivy Bridge-E are the only options. It would be interesting to know what model# Intel would give for Ivy Bridge-E, would it be i7-4XXX ? :confused:
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#9
Inceptor
by: NHKS
It would be interesting to know what model# Intel would give for Ivy Bridge-E, would it be i7-4XXX ?
Most likely, i7-48xx and i7-49xx, following the SB-E numbering scheme.
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#10
kajson
The only thing I really really don't get, is why only the top models get the 4000 igp, one would think that actually the lower budget versions are the ones that end up in low end builds without dedicated gfx, in which case the extra igp power would be more then welcome. Where the K chips will be mostly combined with a decent vid card....
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#11
n-ster
by: NHKS
As far as I know, 6/8 core versions of would be reserved for Ivy Bridge-E(expected late 2012-early 2013) without the integrated graphics unit and will come as i7's with different socket (LGA 2011).
Ivy Bridge(socket LGA 1155) is supposed to cater to the mainstream market and its whole purpose is to provide decent graphics performance without the need for a dedicated graphics card. Intel's integrated graphics may not able able to handle graphics-intensive games comfortably, but will satisfy the needs of the average home PC user or multimedia users (like basic gaming, video editing, transcoding,etc).
If you dont want an Ivy Bridge with integrated graphics, Sandy Bridge-E(current) (or) Ivy Bridge-E are the only options. It would be interesting to know what model# Intel would give for Ivy Bridge-E, would it be i7-4XXX ? :confused:
arent there 2550K etc that have their IGP stripped out?
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#12
MxPhenom 216
Corsair Fanboy
I want a 3770k and Z77 motherboard!
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#13
mcloughj
are all these for socket 1155? are there going to be any socket 2011 IVY processors?
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#15
btarunr
Editor & Senior Moderator
by: Prima.Vera
What is "build-in visuals" ??!
Intel being ashamed to used the term "graphics".
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#16
EarthDog
by: mcloughj
are all these for socket 1155? are there going to be any socket 2011 IVY processors?
That would be Ivybridge-E, like Sandbridge-E.
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#17
Ross1
by: kajson
The only thing I really really don't get, is why only the top models get the 4000 igp, one would think that actually the lower budget versions are the ones that end up in low end builds without dedicated gfx, in which case the extra igp power would be more then welcome. Where the K chips will be mostly combined with a decent vid card....
Yeah, I agree with that. At least have the option of a sans IGP i7k.
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#18
trickson
OH, I have such a headache
YEAH Intel For the WIN! Keeping the market alive and well! Moving forward with such speed and innovation!
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#20
trickson
OH, I have such a headache
Who cares about iGPU? I mean there CPU's KILL! And getting a video card of your choice is much better than some CPU with a GPU on it. JMHO. I never liked integrated graphics any way.
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#21
NHKS
by: n-ster
arent there 2550K etc that have their IGP stripped out?
NOT having an IGP is different from 'non-functional' IGP. I believe in the latter since Sandy Bridge 'without' any IGP would mean a new die design, which is not possible. More likely is the fact that the 2550K parts are 'binned' chips which have a non-functional/partly functional IGP because of yields and hence Intel decided to have a new model ,ie, 2550K with IGP 'disabled'. Also, 2550K(3.4GHz) has a 100MHz speed bump over 2500K(3.3GHz) and is unlocked (hence suffix K).

Other recent Intel SB models with disabled IGPs are i5 - 2380P & 2450P.

This might happen with Ivy Bridge too, but not at launch or anytime soon after that.
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#22
NHKS
by: kajson
The only thing I really really don't get, is why only the top models get the 4000 igp, one would think that actually the lower budget versions are the ones that end up in low end builds without dedicated gfx, in which case the extra igp power would be more then welcome. Where the K chips will be mostly combined with a decent vid card....
Thats a very valid question!.. Considering that Intel wants to target mainstream users they should be giving HD 4000 across all models... But disappointingly its not the case and I have so far seen only one i3 model (i3-3225) which will have HD4000 and most i5's will have HD2500. :(
(http://media.bestofmicro.com/W/B/326459/original/Ivy%20Bridge%20Core%20i3%20002.jpg)
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#24
mastrdrver
by: Shakur92
any news about the release date? is still set to 29 april for quad core desktop?
Not April. June-ish.
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#25
EarthDog
Last reports all said MOBILE processors are delayed. Im not sure why this is getting constantly messed up. But its across forums too. :(

MOBILE.
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