Wednesday, June 6th 2012

Warm Tek Displays a Refreshing New Heatsink Design

This bunch of neatly arranged copper rods caught our eyes at Computex. Called the "Blonde Hedgehog," the exhibit below is a new heatsink design concept, in which numerous copper rods bunch up inside a ring, which makes up the base, where they make direct contact with the CPU, and fan-out towards the top. A fan then ventilates the bunch. The copper rod design ensures extremely high surface area for dissipation, the down-flow of the air cools other components surrounding the CPU socket, as well. The rods are held together by pressure, and not welding. In fact, the designers are bragging about the design being weld-free.

Warm Tek has two variations of the design, the standard one, Blonde Hedgehog C120, has exposed copper rods, and measures 140 x 140 x 90 mm, utilizing a 120 mm custom-design fan. The exposed copper rods are put through anti-oxidant treatment at the factory. There's a variant with nickel-plated copper rods, too. Another, slightly different and smaller variation of this, is called Baby Hedgehog, which measures 90 x 90 x 30 mm, and is meant for low-power CPUs.
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33 Comments on Warm Tek Displays a Refreshing New Heatsink Design

#1
Sasqui
That's awesome, I want one.

Now they need to figure out how to mash together 100's of heatpipes the same way, rather than solid metal rods ;)
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#2
Liquid Cool
These remind me of the OLD Swiftech Design. Those sucker's we're about the heaviest CPU cooler I've ever owned. Very Solid.

Best,

LC
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#3
bear jesus
by: btarunr
Blonde Hedgehog C120, has exposed copper heat pipes
Is that correct?

Either way i would like to know these perform and if there are no heat pipes then they should get working on the heat pipe version.

Also I am curious if it could be used passively on a low power CPU as i love the look and it may fit in my HTPC, although possibly only without the fan.
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#4
phanbuey
I have a feeling that these will not work very well.
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#5
caleb
I can seel these coolers for cheap they just need some mount modding and you're good to go
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#6
Dj-ElectriC
I actually simulated in my head that kind of design. Nice to see this.
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#7
ice_v
by: phanbuey
I have a feeling that these will not work very well.
I was about to say the same...although I cant quite figure out why, could it be that it might have to do with heat not being properly moved away from the rods since they are positioned that way? Plus the base of the heatsink seems to have a very uneven surface, far from mirror flat with a lot of micro-holes that won't perform great even with excelent thermal paste (too many micro air-bubbles)
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#8
MoonPig
Coooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooool

Want one to play with!
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#9
TheMailMan78
Big Member
Looks like a black girls pony tail. I like it.
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#10
radrok
I could see this as a weapon :O or a potato smasher
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#11
Nick [D]vB
Turbulence might be a problem, no clear flow path for the fan output, looks cool though... :cool:
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#13
Steevo
So what happens as it slowly packs full of lint and dust? As you try to clean it it pushes the debris further into the rods.

Plus fans have little to no flow at the center due to the motor, and this cooler provides little in the way of airflow directing to help cool the hottest part of the CPU.


Perhaps for a "look" build, but certainly not for a serious performance build.
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#14
white phantom
you know the worlds gone to pot when they use the top of a fibre optic decoration to cool a cpu ...
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#15
lyndonguitar
I play games


are the rods randomly standing around? or is there a certain structure/design to it?
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#16
No_Asylum
by: white phantom
you know the worlds gone to pot when they use the top of a fibre optic decoration to cool a cpu ...
"Pot" being the operative word of course ;-)
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#17
Kreij
Senior Monkey Moderator
by: lyndonguitar

are the rods randomly standing around? or is there a certain structure/design to it?
They did a bi-variate scatter plot of the people who think it's cool by the people who think it's efficient and came up with the rod placement. lol
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#18
pantherx12
Old design is old, and not very effective compared to heatpipe + aluminum fins.

If these were all mini heatpipes somehow it be a great new design.

(old design is cool though I wouldn't mind one)
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#19
yogurt_21
by: Mussels
we have brushes like that bottom one at work. THEY GODDAMNED HURT WHEN YOU STAB YOURSELF WITH THEM.



these heatsinks will cause a death one day.
lol

by: Steevo
So what happens as it slowly packs full of lint and dust? As you try to clean it it pushes the debris further into the rods.

Plus fans have little to no flow at the center due to the motor, and this cooler provides little in the way of airflow directing to help cool the hottest part of the CPU.


Perhaps for a "look" build, but certainly not for a serious performance build.
never heard of a dishwasher? besides from the look of it the rods can be pushed around by airflow (it's the only way i see the hot air escaping successfully) so a standard air can would work.

by: lyndonguitar
http://www.techpowerup.com/img/12-06-06/88d.jpg

are the rods randomly standing around? or is there a certain structure/design to it?
It looks like they simply pressure bunch them at the bottom and the rods naturally flow outward in a circle. In order for it to work the cooler would need to be a bit more flowing than rigid so there likely isn't too much they could do to force them to stay where they are boyond the placement of the longer ones on the edges vs the shorter ones in the center.
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#20
Isenstaedt
by: Dj-ElectriC
I actually simulated in my head that kind of design.
So you imagined it :D
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#21
H82LUZ73
So what happens when someone pulls the rods out ,They are not welded in .....
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#23
Delta6326
...
Family: So how did he die?
Detective: We think he was killed by his computer.
Family: What! How?
Detective: Well it looks like it tripped him with the power cord and then the computer stabbed him with the heatsink...
Family: I told him not to do all that stress testing on his computer...
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#24
RejZoR
Enzotech had such design ages ago...
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#25
zAAm
Problem again with increased surface area without having adequate airflow around it... Then you have the conduction part nailed but have no dissipation i.e. lots of very hot air accumulating in the center of this thing with no way it can be replaced by cooler air.

Looks very backyard DIY though ;)
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