Friday, March 22nd 2013

Stealth Introduces Mini PC with Core "Ivy Bridge" Processor

Stealth.com Inc. (Stealth Computer) a leading ISO 9001 manufacturer of industrial rugged computers and peripherals has released a new powerful small form factor PC. The new Stealth Extreme Power model LPC-480 mini PC is Stealth's most powerful small form factor computer to date continuing their history of delivering small high performance computers for demanding applications.

The LPC-480 outperforms other small sized PC systems due to the integration of the latest Intel 3rd Generation Core i7 mobile processors. The LPC-480 ships with a standard Intel i7 Processor 3610QE CPU exceeding the performance of computers many times its physical size. The LPC-480 LittlePC measures an amazing 5.7" x 9.9" and less than 1.65" in height or about the size of a hard cover novel.

"Our new Stealth Model: LPC-480 is the most powerful and technologically advanced small form PC we have introduced to date. Our full featured machine utilizes the new third generation Intel Core i7 mobile processors and we truly believe it delivers the most processing power of any small form-factor computer available on the market today." stated Ed Boutilier CEO of Stealth.com Inc.

The LPC-480 small mini PC features a multitude of I/O connectivity built into its impressively small design such as; 4-USB 3.0, 2-USB 2.0, 1-DVI-D, 1-VGA, 1-Gigabit LAN, 2-RS232 Serial and Line In/Out Audio ports.

The LPC-480 supports up to 16GB in DDR3 memory and is available with a 2.5" mobile hard drive or Solid State Drive (SSD) in various capacities. A slim DVD-RW/CD-RW optical disk drive comes standard with an optional Blu-ray burner available.

Systems are compatible with Microsoft Windows 7, 8, XP, Linux, etc and can be custom configured to meet the exact needs of the end user. Stealth's new LPC-480 Small Form PC is currently shipping with configurations starting from $1,325.00 USD.
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26 Comments on Stealth Introduces Mini PC with Core "Ivy Bridge" Processor

#1
Jacez
Optical disk? Really?
Posted on Reply
#2
dwade
And who in the hell will buy this? No gaming GPU, so this ain't gonna cater to PC gamers. General computing... already fulfilled by the more dominating mobile devices. This thing is just an under-powered desktop. Pointless in this era.
Posted on Reply
#4
syeef
They got an Optical disk drive in there as well? :eek:
Posted on Reply
#5
lZKoce
What I don't understand is the I/o on the back. VGA really?- that standard is officialy getting out 2015, in 2 years time. And 2x RS232?- may be for offices, but event then the big printer machines offer may other ways to connect- LAN, USB, etc.
Posted on Reply
#7
Aquinus
Resident Wat-man
by: Jacez
Optical disk? Really?
It's a slim drive, barely takes up space. You're complaining about this why?
by: dwade
And who in the hell will buy this? No gaming GPU, so this ain't gonna cater to PC gamers. General computing... already fulfilled by the more dominating mobile devices. This thing is just an under-powered desktop. Pointless in this era.
That's because this isn't designed for gaming...
by: syeef
They got an Optical disk drive in there as well? :eek:
Your point? It barely takes up any space.
by: lZKoce
What I don't understand is the I/o on the back. VGA really?- that standard is officialy getting out 2015, in 2 years time. And 2x RS232?- may be for offices, but event then the big printer machines offer may other ways to connect- LAN, USB, etc.
A lot of KVM switches on a server racks use VGA. If this is for business that makes sense. This machine isn't for your "typical user" or a gamer. This is like complaining about a GeForce 610 GT and saying it can't run Crysis 3 at full graphics. It's not supposed to, simple as that. However I would have liked to see a second LAN port instead of the PS/2 ports.

by: de.das.dude
pathetic.....
I think you're all misunderstanding the point of this PC.

Lets get one fact perfectly clear. This computer is not for gaming in any way, shape or form... so don't treat it as such. :shadedshu

Second of all, as a system admin you would be surprised at how many devices you can have (mostly UPS devices,) that still use COM for communicating UPS info to a server. COM is an old standard but it works and has been around for a long time. I'm sure half of you would complain if it was a USB-COM adapter as well.

This machine has a lot of CPU power for it's form factor as well as the fact that it uses a mobile extreme edition CPU. The CPU alone has a market value of > 400 USD, so that's a large portion of the price. You're also going to be hard pressed to find this kind of performance with a 45-watt TDP.

All in all, this is designed for a low form factor, low power, high performance machine. It is not designed for gaming and is most likely designed for business and typical usage.
Posted on Reply
#8
syeef
by: Aquinus
point? It barely takes up any space.
who uses Optical drives now anyway?
Posted on Reply
#9
Aquinus
Resident Wat-man
by: syeef
who uses Optical drives now anyway?
People who watch Blu-Ray and DVDs? People who burn installation media and use installation media on optical disks. People who use optical media for backup.

Plenty of people still use optical drives. Just because you don't doesn't mean other don't as well.
Posted on Reply
#10
Crap Daddy
The problem is not so much about I/O ports but the price. These guys from the PC business seem to live in a parallel universe. It's no wonder ARM/mobile is wiping the floor with them. For one third of that money one can get a top 10 inch tablet (it also has a SCREEN!) which will do everything what this item will do except productivity for which anyway you will need something else that this small box. Tell me one reason to buy this thing. Hell, even at 500$ I would think twice.
Posted on Reply
#11
Aquinus
Resident Wat-man
by: Crap Daddy
The problem is not so much about I/O ports but the price. These guys from the PC business seem to live in a parallel universe. It's no wonder ARM/mobile is wiping the floor with them. For one third of that money one can get a top 10 inch tablet (it also has a SCREEN!) which will do everything what this item will do except productivity for which anyway you will need something else that this small box. Tell me one reason to buy this thing. Hell, even at 500$ I would think twice.
It's the processor, it's low power 45-watt TDP quad-core with hyper-threading and turbo. 500 USD is barely enough to cover the cost of the CPU alone. If space and power isn't a factor then this isn't for you. Is it really that hard to understand? In a lot of places, space, power, and sound generated are very important. Most people who are working don't want a huge tower taking up their entire desk and most employers will understand that buying 20 machines that cost half as much that use 3 times more power isn't cost effective like buying 20 machines that use a 1/3 of the power. Long term it pays off when you buy in bulk.

This is not geared towards your typical consumer, this geared towards business.

A 10-inch tablet for a 1/3 of the price probably is at least 1/3 as capable as well... Are you really going to compare a tablet with an ARM processor to an i7? That's comparing apples and oranges and is a terrible comparison.
Posted on Reply
#12
Prima.Vera
OK Aquinus, please provide several example on how come this thing is better that a laptop or a tablet. For business use...
Posted on Reply
#13
Crap Daddy
by: Aquinus
A 10-inch tablet for a 1/3 of the price probably is at least 1/3 as capable as well... Are you really going to compare a tablet with an ARM processor to an i7? That's comparing apples and oranges and is a terrible comparison.
I am not comparing an ARM with an i7 from sheer power point of view. They cannot be compared. I was talking about the usefulness of the devices and yes, personal use and not business. If you are talking about businesses think Surface Pro. 1000$ and it has also a SCREEN. I guess there are businesses and businesses, some will want 20 machines with a mobile i7 inside launched a year ago for 1300$ a piece
Posted on Reply
#14
Aquinus
Resident Wat-man
by: Crap Daddy
If you are talking about businesses think Surface Pro. 1000$ and it has also a SCREEN. I guess there are businesses and businesses, some will want 20 machines with a mobile i7 inside launched a year ago for 1300$ a piece
A surface doesn't have a CPU this powerful, the i5 in the surface pro is a dual-core at lowers clocks iirc. Yeah, it has a screen but the i7 also completely out-powers it. If you need the processing power of an i7 why would you get a surface? It doesn't make sense.

The point I'm making is if you need something this powerful, you're not going to be looking at the surface considering the two products are targeting two different markets. You don't buy a Celeron if you're going to be gaming and you don't buy an i7 if you're only going to be browsing.

This targets a different audience than the Surface Pro so your argument is moot.

by: Prima.Vera
OK Aquinus, please provide several example on how come this thing is better that a laptop or a tablet. For business use...
Machines that are connected to medical equipment typically aren't going anywhere and if they are, they're on a cart with all the other instruments it needs. You're also not going to be using Windows 8 for that kind of thing so the surface is already off the table for half of its usefulness. I could see this being useful for Hospitals. The CPU supports vPro and remote management so it would make sense for wide-scale deployment as well. Space and time costs money too.
Posted on Reply
#15
scazbala86
by: btarunr
a leading ISO 9001 manufacturer of industrial rugged computers
This is an industrial PC, plain and simple, and as an Systems Admin in a manufacturing environment I would say heck, slap a couple more com ports on this thing. They are used for a huge number of devices in industrial setting, weight scales, labeling printers, PLCs, line controllers, photo eye sensor, sonic sensors, the list goes on and on. Lots of industrial PC manufacturers still get away with slapping old mobile core 2 duo or celerons in a device like this and charging $2000+ for it.
Posted on Reply
#16
de.das.dude
Pro Indian Modder
by: Aquinus
It's a slim drive, barely takes up space. You're complaining about this why?

That's because this isn't designed for gaming...

Your point? It barely takes up any space.

A lot of KVM switches on a server racks use VGA. If this is for business that makes sense. This machine isn't for your "typical user" or a gamer. This is like complaining about a GeForce 610 GT and saying it can't run Crysis 3 at full graphics. It's not supposed to, simple as that. However I would have liked to see a second LAN port instead of the PS/2 ports.



I think you're all misunderstanding the point of this PC.

Lets get one fact perfectly clear. This computer is not for gaming in any way, shape or form... so don't treat it as such. :shadedshu

Second of all, as a system admin you would be surprised at how many devices you can have (mostly UPS devices,) that still use COM for communicating UPS info to a server. COM is an old standard but it works and has been around for a long time. I'm sure half of you would complain if it was a USB-COM adapter as well.

This machine has a lot of CPU power for it's form factor as well as the fact that it uses a mobile extreme edition CPU. The CPU alone has a market value of > 400 USD, so that's a large portion of the price. You're also going to be hard pressed to find this kind of performance with a 45-watt TDP.

All in all, this is designed for a low form factor, low power, high performance machine. It is not designed for gaming and is most likely designed for business and typical usage.
this isnt for a server, neither can you game on it. so i dont see the point of a ivy bridge i5. thats why i said its useless. the only places it can be used for is in office applications, and some form of simulations. thats it.
Posted on Reply
#17
Inceptor
by: de.das.dude
this isnt for a server, neither can you game on it. so i dont see the point of a ivy bridge i5. thats why i said its useless. the only places it can be used for is in office applications, and some form of simulations. thats it.
That was the point Aquinas was making.
But it's not useless, as he pointed out.

If it's useless to you it doesn't mean it's useless to the rest of the world.

Too many of you are extremely narrow minded and without broad horizons when it comes to the uses of computers, and when it comes to how a manufacturer prices computational devices according to their markets and use.

(don't say you knew that already, because if you did, you wouldn't have posted a response to the original story).

:rolleyes:
Posted on Reply
#18
v12dock
by: Prima.Vera
OK Aquinus, please provide several example on how come this thing is better that a laptop or a tablet. For business use...
We use desktops this size all the time at work. They run giant robots in factories and they need serial ports.
Posted on Reply
#19
de.das.dude
Pro Indian Modder
by: v12dock
We use desktops this size all the time at work. They run giant robots in factories and they need serial ports.
Robots are usually run with the help of industry grade embedded systems made by intel, via, etc. using an ivy bridge will be expensive and unreliable.
Posted on Reply
#20
tokyoduong
This is not aimed at the consumer market. Nobody will be gaming with this. Please don't compare this to any gaming machine or laptop. It is not meant to be carried around.

I can see this being in a lot of places but nowhere a regular consumer would see.
Posted on Reply
#21
Aquinus
Resident Wat-man
by: de.das.dude
Robots are usually run with the help of industry grade embedded systems made by intel, via, etc. using an ivy bridge will be expensive and unreliable.
That's not always the case. The only difference is that embedded systems have less resources and are designed to do a task in real-time where that isn't strictly the case with regular processors. Robotics for manufacturing don't always use embedded processors.

Not to say embedded systems aren't more common but it's no more or less reliable than an embedded system, it really depends on how you implement it. Not what you implement it on.

I'm getting the irking feeling that you don't know what you're talking about.
Posted on Reply
#22
Doc41
I don't get why is everyone arguing about it, it's an SFF PC aimed at businesses and industrial use "that's what stealth manufactures anyway, visit their website"
just as aquinus and other people here stated, i don't think you should bash a product just because you don't like it or have no use for it (in this case the components and IO choices)

just stating my opinion on this.
Posted on Reply
#23
Easy Rhino
Linux Advocate
there has to be a use case for something like this, but i just can't come up with one...
Posted on Reply
#24
niko084
To those naysayers, I build a lot of small form factor high powered PC's for businesses.

Now onto the use, for instance I support a company that has a sales team of 30, it's very often they have between 20-30 browser windows open, word, outlook, excel, access, inventory management, accounting, some of them run virtual machines to use old proprietary software they need... This is not something you want to do on an i3 with 4gb of ram. A lot of times companies like this can also get strapped for space due to rapid expansion, small form factor comes in handy, let alone they take up less space for having an extra few on hand for when one fails, drop it in place done back in business in 10 minutes.

Lastly, why don't they want laptops? Because then they have to deal with laptop problems and employee issues like them wanting to take them home, broken screens because some idiot dropped a book on it, the list is endless.

These look sweet, I might take a closer look at them, however I wish they had 2 (or more) DVI/DP/HDMI.
Posted on Reply
#25
SaiZo
Since it's powerful (looking at the CPU), it can be used maybe for banking systems in a smaller store, acting as a "server" for some sort of shopping system. Usually, the systems have their own small computer, but I have seen models where they are connected elsewhere.
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