Thursday, June 6th 2013

EVGA GeForce GTX 780 Classified and GTX 770 Classified Pictured

The Classified brand extension marks the very best from EVGA's stable. The company showed off its GeForce GTX 780 and GTX 770 Classified cards, which combine a meaty new variant of its ACX cooling solution, with custom-design PCBs. The GTX 780 Classified should make EVGA ready for when NVIDIA allows custom-design GTX TITAN. Drawing power from two 8-pin PCIe power connectors, the GTX 780 Classified appears to feature a 14-phase VRM, which makes the PCB a good inch or two taller than most full-height cards. That's also a reasonable trade-off to keep the cooler dual-slot, which would greatly help with SLI builds using the card. Moving on to the GTX 770 Classified, the card offers a similar 14-phase VRM, draws power from a pair of 8-pin connectors, features 4 GB of memory, and features an ACX identical cooling solution to the GTX 780 Classified. EVGA didn't disclose clock speeds, both cards appear to feature redundant BIOS, the GTX 780 Classified features header for an EVBot-like device.
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17 Comments on EVGA GeForce GTX 780 Classified and GTX 770 Classified Pictured

#1
Lazermonkey
Nice looking cards :)

Also the 4GB on the 770.
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#2
ogharaei
TPU Proofreader
by: Lazermonkey
Nice looking cards :)
I really like this cooler, but the Classified should come with a backplate. The 770 Classified will probably cost $500 dollars, though.
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#3
VulkanBros
by: ogharaei
I really like this cooler, but the Classified should come with a backplate. This piece will probably cost $500 dollars, though.
Once you registered your EVGA card they will send you a back-plate

Quote from rwlabs.com:
Also, make sure you register the graphics card as soon as you get it. Once it is registered EVGA will send you a backplate free of charge.
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#4
BigMack70
I had to buy backplates separately for my 780s :(

Anyways I don't understand what the point of all this power circuitry is on Nvidia's cards at the moment, since they are pretty much neutered for any sort of real overclocking unless you're willing to voltmod the card.
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#5
1c3d0g
Awesome!

Excellent! I heard these fans are double ball bearing designs, and are 15% quieter than the already incredible stock "Titan" cooler. This is sweet music to my ears, as I live in an extremely hot and dusty climate. :cool:
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#6
BigMack70
by: 1c3d0g
Excellent! I heard these fans are double ball bearing designs, and are 15% quieter than the already incredible stock "Titan" cooler. This is sweet music to my ears, as I live in an extremely hot and dusty climate. :cool:
It's true, these are dead silent. I've got a pair of the ACX SC in SLI, and I never hear them. My temps rarely even get above 70C at stock... I'm amazed.

It's so much better than the Twin Frozr IV cooler I had on my 7970 lightnings it's crazy. My jaw dropped when I switched and saw/heard the difference.
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#7
DinaAngel
by: BigMack70
I had to buy backplates separately for my 780s :(

Anyways I don't understand what the point of all this power circuitry is on Nvidia's cards at the moment, since they are pretty much neutered for any sort of real overclocking unless you're willing to voltmod the card.
you can overclock them quite far, some people have managed 1250 mhz on core and 7000 effective on memmory, on stock cooler, some people says u can push it even further with liquid cooling. gpus love liquid cooling, its dramatic effect with it in temps
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#8
BigMack70
by: DinaAngel
you can overclock them quite far, some people have managed 1250 mhz on core and 7000 effective on memmory, on stock cooler, some people says u can push it even further with liquid cooling. gpus love liquid cooling, its dramatic effect with it in temps
Sorry, I should have been more clear. Nvidia has neutered the voltage control on these cards, so there is no point in having beefier VRMs/power circuitry. I didn't necessarily mean the cards can't overclock, I just meant that there is no point in paying extra for an overengineered PCB.
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#9
DinaAngel
by: BigMack70
Sorry, I should have been more clear. Nvidia has neutered the voltage control on these cards, so there is no point in having beefier VRMs/power circuitry.
evga has something called overvoltage, nvidia i believe they set it so u can overvolt them but its not needed normally for 1200mhz. i dont remember the ammount but with precision i believe u can set volts bit further because of evga overvoltage, but u hafto manually enable it, and also the kepler bios editor works with 780. also theres some 780s with custom pcbs thats out and coming out
http://www.techpowerup.com/185098/galaxy-also-unveils-first-gtx-780-graphics-card-with-custom-pcb.html
thats one, i believe asus will come out with DCII or so with alloyed digi power
the point isnt more voltage, its so the current is more and its a bit silly also since its trying to go around the problem of more clean current going into the core circuit, if the current is more clean then its a higher possibility to go further. if the current was clean enaugh then 1500 would had been possible but again it would had maybe taken years or it would had needed special pcb conductors, not all gpus does come with the best capacitors either, and the thing is that the more u cool it down the less resistance the current gets and its more clean
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#10
BigMack70
It's +38 mV on standard 780s which is pretty much meaningless and definitely doesn't need a custom PCB, I don't know if Nvidia will allow more than that on any of the cards. Given what they did with the 6xx series, I doubt it.

Would be nice if they stopped such stupid restrictions though and let the board partners decide to allow overvoltage or not; one of my biggest complaints with how Nvidia has handled the Kepler cards is that they've made overclocking totally uninteresting by limiting/eliminating any real voltage control of their cards.
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#11
KashunatoR
Bigmac is right. My 780 goes to 1228 mhz and that's it. The 38 mV overvoltage is in fact 25 mv. 1.18V is as far as it goes. So does a friend's Titan. Unless Nvidia allow partners to unlock the voltage, any custom card is pretty much useless. Watercooling is also useless as even the reference cooler is amazingly silent. This card blew me away though.
Coming from a reference gtx 680 which was massively overclocked (1267/7000) using a custom bios I'm seing 40% more fps with the gtx 780. That's enough to keep me happy :).
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#12
CoD511
Read the article again and if you still don't get the reference to an EVBot header on the 780 Classified and what it means for voltage control, Google EVBot! :toast:
Posted on Reply
#13
BigMack70
by: CoD511
Read the article again and if you still don't get the reference to an EVBot header on the 780 Classified and what it means for voltage control, Google EVBot! :toast:
I understand, but I am still skeptical. For example:
http://www.guru3d.com/news_story/nvidia_asks_evga_to_pull_evbot_support_from_gtx_680_classified.html

Nvidia has made it very clear with Kepler cards so far that they do not want board partners allowing users to mess with voltages. I hope that stance changes on the 7xx series, but I will believe it when I see it.

I expect this may be like the 680 classified and 680 lightning where you need to get one of the initial run cards before Nvidia gives it the thumbs down and makes EVGA/etc change it.
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#14
jihadjoe
The Classified is probably the first non-reference 780 I find myself taking a liking to.
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#15
DinaAngel
by: BigMack70
I understand, but I am still skeptical. For example:
http://www.guru3d.com/news_story/nvidia_asks_evga_to_pull_evbot_support_from_gtx_680_classified.html

Nvidia has made it very clear with Kepler cards so far that they do not want board partners allowing users to mess with voltages. I hope that stance changes on the 7xx series, but I will believe it when I see it.

I expect this may be like the 680 classified and 680 lightning where you need to get one of the initial run cards before Nvidia gives it the thumbs down and makes EVGA/etc change it.
evga did ship alot of 680s where u could alter the voltage and also asus did but they just tried hide that fact and the thing is that u still can usually as they will just try hide the fact that they didnt listen to nvidia, also my motherboard on my main rig u can just solder a asus 680 card hotwire to the motherboard and u can alter volts, believe me iv tried and it works
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#16
BigMack70
Could you provide a source that they tried to hide what they were doing? I find it much more likely that they immediately complied with Nvidia, since it would be the death of them if Nvidia decided to blacklist them and not give them chips anymore.

Obviously all the cards produced before Nvidia's ultimatum would be able to have voltage control, though - and the results at least on the 680 Lightning with unlocked software voltage control were very impressive.

Not many people are comfortable voltmodding their motherboards and cards, regardless of if it works or not.
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#17
Nailezs
any details on how these will compare to the evga gtx 780 SC ACX?
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