Tuesday, June 11th 2013

AMD Unleashes First-Ever 5 GHz Processor

AMD today unveiled its most powerful member of the legendary AMD FX family of CPUs, the world's first commercially available 5 GHz CPU processor, the AMD FX-9590. These 8-core CPUs deliver new levels of gaming and multimedia performance for desktop enthusiasts. AMD FX-9000 Series CPUs will be available initially in PCs through system integrators.

"At E3 this week, AMD demonstrated why it is at the core of gaming," said Bernd Lienhard, corporate vice president and general manager, Client Products Division at AMD. "The new FX 5 GHz processor is an emphatic performance statement to the most demanding gamers seeking ultra-high resolution experiences including AMD Eyefinity technology. This is another proud innovation for AMD in delivering the world's first commercially available 5 GHz processor."

"AMD continues to push the envelope when it comes to desktop capabilities and power performance," said Wallace Santos, CEO and founder of MAINGEAR. "In unveiling the world's first 5 GHz 8-core CPU, AMD continues to lead the way in innovation while providing our customers with a best-in-class experience. We are thrilled to be part of this exciting launch."

The new 5 GHz FX-9590 and 4.7 GHz FX-9370 feature the "Piledriver" architecture, are unlocked for easy overclocking and pave the way for enthusiasts to enjoy higher CPU speeds and related performance gains. Additionally, these processors feature AMD Turbo Core 3.0 technology to dynamically optimize performance across CPU cores and enable maximum computing for the most intensive workloads.

AMD was the first to break the 1 GHz barrier in May of 2000 and continues to set the standard in technology innovation including the first Windows compatible 64-bit PC processor and the first native dual-core and quad-core processors. AMD also introduced the first APU (unifying CPU and Radeon graphics on the same chip) and the first x86 quad-core SoC, continuing forward with HSA architectures and programming models.

The new AMD FX CPUs will be available from system integrators globally beginning this summer. Two models will be available:
  • FX-9590: Eight "Piledriver" cores, 5 GHz Max Turbo
  • FX-9370: Eight "Piledriver" cores, 4.7 GHz Max Turbo
Add your own comment

147 Comments on AMD Unleashes First-Ever 5 GHz Processor

#1
Xenturion
I wonder if this will have the 220W TDP. And with that, I wonder what board's VRMs will be able to handle it. I'd imagine AMD will come up with a compatibility list.
Posted on Reply
#2
jigar2speed
Reviews or this is just a paper lunch. ;)
Posted on Reply
#3
Mathragh
With all these GPU's gobbling up power in excess of 200W, I suppose a higher-powered CPU isn't that outlandish.

I do also however wonder what this is going to mean for efficiency(probably going way downhill :P)
Posted on Reply
#4
BernardV
Single threaded performance will probably still suck as per normal?
Posted on Reply
#5
Prima.Vera
When can we expect a comparison review please?
Posted on Reply
#6
Jorge
1. The "reported" 220w number is not necessarily TDP, it is probably total power consumed not power dissipated. TDP is probably more like 165w.

2. Current highend AM3+ mobos with good VRM circuits already run Vishera FX-8350's at ~5.0 GHz. without issue @ 1.5v so no new mobo is required if you have an AM3+ mobo now with a good VRM circuit design.

3. Single thread performance increases with clockspeed just like multi-threading performance

4. Properly written software for 8 -core CPUs such as the FX-8350 have shown as much as a 50% performance advantage over Intel CPUs.

5. AMD continues to up the CPU/APU clockspeeds and that has significant advantage in current APUs and when Kaveri shows up this Fall.
Posted on Reply
#7
Melvis
5GHz is just insane!!!

Benchmarks in programs that use 8threads are going to be where these things beat everything else I would near expect? Maybe
Posted on Reply
#8
Mathragh
What are peoples opinions by the way:

Does this chip include some of the mojo which made trinity into richland or,,
Is this chip just the result of heavy binning and upping the TDP?
Posted on Reply
#9
Melvis
by: Mathragh
What are peoples opinions by the way:

Does this chip include some of the mojo which made trinity into richland or,,
Is this chip just the result of heavy binning and upping the TDP?
Theres gotta be more then just heavy binning and upping the TDP you would have to think?
Posted on Reply
#10
blibba
by: Jorge
1. The "reported" 220w number is not necessarily TDP, it is probably total power consumed not power dissipated. TDP is probably more like 165w.
Conservation of energy. If 220W goes in, 220W goes out.
Posted on Reply
#11
Mathragh
by: blibba
Conservation of energy. If 220W goes in, 220W goes out.
Aye, but not all as heat, energy can also just flow through it, generating nothing(like it would through an (ideally conductive) wire).
Posted on Reply
#12
badtaylorx
price???

id like to pick one of these up......but if the price is even close to an intel 3930k im out......
Posted on Reply
#13
newtekie1
Semi-Retired Folder
by: jigar2speed
Reviews or this is just a paper lunch. ;)
An unveiling is not a launch.

by: Mathragh
Aye, but not all as heat, energy can also just flow through it, generating nothing(like it would through an (ideally conductive) wire).
In that case then energy wouldn't be "consumed", so it wouldn't be "power consumption".;)
Posted on Reply
#14
blibba
by: newtekie1
An unveiling is not a launch.
Or even a lunch :P
Posted on Reply
#15
brandonwh64
Addicted to Bacon and StarCrunches!!!
by: blibba
Or even a lunch :P
Lunch does sound good right now!
Posted on Reply
#16
Mathragh
by: newtekie1
An unveiling is not a launch.



In that case then energy wouldn't be "consumed", so it wouldn't be "power consumption".;)
It would be actually:) Since it would have been pulled from the net before it ran through the CPU, and because after it ran through the CPU, it wont be usable anymore, it is effectively part of the power used and part of the power consumption.
Posted on Reply
#17
Vinska
by: jigar2speed
Reviews or this is just a paper lunch. ;)
Don't remind me of my middleschool years, when I used to munch on my homework in front of my teacher as a protest every once in a while.

back on topic: Indeed, would like more info in this chip. Especially the TDP and pricing...
Posted on Reply
#18
newtekie1
Semi-Retired Folder
by: Mathragh
It would be actually:) Since it would have been pulled from the net before it ran through the CPU, and because after it ran through the CPU, it wont be usable anymore, it is effectively part of the power used and part of the power consumption.
That isn't how power works. Power doesn't become unusable, if it is put back in the system it is usable. The only way it can become unusable would be for it to be completely removed from the system, and the only way it can be completely removed from the system would be to be turned into heat.
Posted on Reply
#19
silkstone
by: blibba
Conservation of energy. If 220W goes in, 220W goes out.
by: Mathragh
Aye, but not all as heat, energy can also just flow through it, generating nothing(like it would through an (ideally conductive) wire).
Nope. Energy is work done. If it is using 220 W, then it is doing 220 J of work every second.

Work is done when energy changes forms. So when you read 200 W, that means that 220 W of energy is changing forms every second.

So may people have the idea that energy flows. Physics classes at school must really be failing :(
Posted on Reply
#20
Mathragh
by: newtekie1
That isn't how power works. Power doesn't become unusable, if it is put back in the system it is usable. The only way it can become unusable would be for it to be completely removed from the system, and the only way it can be completely removed from the system would be to be turned into heat.
Or run through the ground wire/positive wire, exiting the part, and the system(closing the loop).

Anyway, look it up if you want, or someone with a degree in electrical engineering correct me. Lets not derail this thread more =D

Edit: just think of a short circuit: no all energy is used(transformed in heat), but there is still a lot more energy running through than without a short circuit
Posted on Reply
#21
JDG1980
This is disappointing. I had thought that AMD learned the lessons of Bulldozer (more GHz and more cores don't matter if single-thread performance sucks), but this raises some doubts. Up until now I was sure this was a rumor, or perhaps a pre-Rory Read holdover that had been nixed.

Selling this to end users would be crazy. If it really has a 220W TDP as rumored, then a cheap motherboard not only wouldn't be able to support it, but might actually catch on fire. That'll be great publicity for AMD if their CPU burns someone's house down. Sure, they can say it's only supported with certain specific boards, but you know not all end users will listen. That said, the statement that these CPUs "will be available initially in PCs through system integrators" indicates to me that they may not be sold through normal retail channels at all. In which case this is basically a stunt. It reminds me of Intel's Pentium III 1.13 GHz (Coppermine Slot 1), which was basically an overclocked chip designed solely to win back the MHz crown from AMD's Athlon. It, too, was for OEMs only, and was authorized for use only with one specific motherboard. Reviewers found that it couldn't run stable at those speeds and it was recalled shortly thereafter. Sad to see the shoe on the other foot now.

Kaveri and Steamroller can't come soon enough.
Posted on Reply
#22
Huguito
FX-9590: Eight "Piledriver" cores, 5 GHz Max Turbo
FX-9370: Eight "Piledriver" cores, 4.7 GHz Max Turbo


max turbo...

MAX... it is NOT going to be ALL cores, MAX turbo works when its a single thread load !!!!

my god, amazing no one knows this already... :shadedshu :slap:
Posted on Reply
#23
silkstone
by: Mathragh


Edit: just think of a short circuit: no all energy is used(transformed in heat), but there is still a lot more energy running through than without a short circuit
You are energy rating with the flow of charge.

You can think of charge flowing back into the power supply is pushed back onto the positive terminal and then ready to be 'used' again.

It's not exactly how it works, and there are inefficiencies (one of the reasons PSU's need fans) but when something 'uses' 220 W of power, all that power is ultimately changed into heat by that component.

An adequate analogy is a water loop. Water flows through the loop, spinning a water-wheel (component) the waterwheel slows down the water where it flows back to another wheel (PSU) which speeds it back up. Any resulting speed that the water carries is carried through the system and water wheel 2 (the PSU) needs to do less work in bringing ti back up to speed.
Posted on Reply
#24
newtekie1
Semi-Retired Folder
by: Mathragh
Or run through the ground wire/positive wire, exiting the part, and the system(closing the loop).

Anyway, look it up if you want, or someone with a degree in electrical engineering correct me. Lets not derail this thread more =D

Edit: just think of a short circuit: no all energy is used(transformed in heat), but there is still a lot more energy running through than without a short circuit
Short circuits generate massive amounts of heat. Stuff tends to melt when there is a short circuit...
Posted on Reply
#25
ZetZet
by: Huguito
FX-9590: Eight "Piledriver" cores, 5 GHz Max Turbo
FX-9370: Eight "Piledriver" cores, 4.7 GHz Max Turbo


max turbo...

MAX... it is NOT going to be ALL cores, MAX turbo works when its a single thread load !!!!

my god, amazing no one knows this already... :shadedshu :slap:
But it will overclock to 5Ghz so easy. ^^
Posted on Reply
Add your own comment