Monday, July 15th 2013

ASUS Brings Haswell Processor Overclocking to H87 and B85 Motherboards

ASUS today announced that the latest UEFI BIOS for its motherboards based on Intel H87 and B85 chipsets unlocks previously inaccessible overclocking features for 4th generation Intel Core processors. Before this update, the overclocking features of new Haswell 'K Series' processors could be enjoyed only with motherboards based on the Intel Z87 chipset. Now, however, performance enthusiasts can exploit the power of Haswell K Series processors using ASUS 8 Series motherboards like the ASUS H87M-PRO and B85-PRO. The BIOS update is a free download for 10 ASUS motherboards - the H87-PRO, H87-PLUS, H87M-PRO, H87M-PLUS, H87M-E, H87I-PLUS, B85-PRO, B85-PLUS, B85M-E and B85M-G.

Once installed, the update enables frequency multiplier-based overclocking in one simple step for unlocked Intel K Series processors such as the Intel Core i7-4770K and Core i5 4670K. The BIOS also includes several features to make life simpler for PC users. A 'Last Modified' log makes it easy to determine when and how a particular setting was changed, and custom settings can be saved to a 'favorites' list for rapid switching to suit different applications.

All-around protection for superior reliability
All ASUS motherboards based on Intel 8 Series chipsets feature high-endurance 5X Protection technology for the ultimate in reliability and durability. DIGI+ VRM voltage regulation ensures precise digital control over power delivery to the processor for reduced energy consumption and enhanced stability, while resettable fuses protect I/O ports and DIMM slots from short circuits and voltage spikes.

Electrostatic-discharge guards also protect sensitive components from electromagnetic interference and high-quality solid capacitors that are industry-rated for a lifespan for over 50 years of continuous use under typical operating conditions (at 65 degrees Centigrade) - over twice as long as traditional electrolytic capacitors.
The newly enabled overclocking features for Intel Haswell K Series processors and the superior reliability of 5X Protection technology reaffirm the ASUS commitment to giving customers the best in PC performance at a price they can afford.

UEFI BIOS updates for ASUS motherboards based on Intel H87 and B85 chipsets can be downloaded from:
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13 Comments on ASUS Brings Haswell Processor Overclocking to H87 and B85 Motherboards

#1
Nabarun
How much is the "overclocking" crippled?

Overclocking on Asus (and other brands') H87-based motherboards is definitely a great news for those who have already purchased one or are inclined/forced to settle for one. Whatever "extra" comes along is all good. But what about the rest of us who are still undecided? Will this BIOS update enable "complete" overclock-ability - like RAM as well? Or is it just gonna be the CPU? Is it gonna be as tweak-able as a Z87 model? Then where does it leave the Z87? What would be the point of getting a Z87-based board then? I'm not stating anything - just curious :)
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#2
erocker
Just going by the pictures of the two boards above. It looks like a 4+1 power phase system. Not exactly what one would want for an overclocking motherboard, though it should suffice for a small OC. Most Z87 boards have more/better components in this regard.
Posted on Reply
#3
Nabarun
True

Hmmm, true. The heatsinks aren't that encouraging either :(
Posted on Reply
#4
tigger
I'm the only one
by: erocker
Just going by the pictures of the two boards above. It looks like a 4+1 power phase system. Not exactly what one would want for an overclocking motherboard, though it should suffice for a small OC. Most Z87 boards have more/better components in this regard.
You think there may be some broken boards going back to Asus?, :ohwell:
Posted on Reply
#5
NdMk2o1o
I managed a good 4.4ghz OC on a cheapy 4+1 phase p67 motherboard and a 2500k, I'm fairly confident these will be able to deliver a similar overclock with HW chips, they're not aimed at serious/extreme overclockers, infact I'd have one over my shitty Gigabyte GA-Z77-DS3h which has K-multi overclocking but only auto vcore so I can only get 4.3ghz stable on my 3570k :banghead:
Posted on Reply
#6
newtekie1
Semi-Retired Folder
The beauty of sharing I.P. with their sister company...
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#7
Sasqui
Did anyone notice the 5Ghz 4670k screenshot at 1.28v? Has ANYONE achieved this with Haswell?
Posted on Reply
#8
newtekie1
Semi-Retired Folder
by: Sasqui
Did anyone notice the 5Ghz 4670k screenshot at 1.28v? Has ANYONE achieved this with Haswell?
I'm pretty sure the current record for Haswell is pretty close to 7GHz, but yes that is a damn low voltage for 5GHz.
Posted on Reply
#9
cadaveca
My name is Dave
by: Sasqui
Did anyone notice the 5Ghz 4670k screenshot at 1.28v?
Yeah, I noticed, and then I noticed that it is an ES CPU. I have given not a single...anyway...

:banghead:


by: Sasqui
Has ANYONE achieved this with Haswell?
Not that I heard of. Might not even be CPU voltage that is shown, could be cache(likely).
Posted on Reply
#10
Nabarun
I heard that due to lack of hyper-threading, the I5s have a better "thermal headroom" (in the bad-heat-dissipation-due-to-22nm world), meaning more room to play around than the higher-end I7. So, 5GHz isn't impossible, but again, that would depend on the PARTICULAR cpu and the user's luck (more so than expertise for the holy Haswell I hear :( Everybody seems awfully quiet about this. Shouldn't Intel be facing loads of sh1tstorm everywhere???).
Posted on Reply
#11
cdawall
where the hell are my stars
by: erocker
Just going by the pictures of the two boards above. It looks like a 4+1 power phase system. Not exactly what one would want for an overclocking motherboard, though it should suffice for a small OC. Most Z87 boards have more/better components in this regard.
Same argument that I had in the other thread low power chips they don't need massive 8-16 phase pwm sections to push a normal clock.
Posted on Reply
#13
mgarr
I wouldn't really recommend it for overclocking, my one recently developed the disturbing habit of getting extremely hot around the 8 pin EATX socket (so hot that I'm surprised the solder near the socket only discolored instead of melting), I had to disable turbo on my cpu to get a temp that even resembled normality (its a core i5 4440). I've had to effectively throttle the amount of power it draws through the socket by using a atx 4 to 8 pin adapter on half of the PSU's 4+4 socket to get any semblance of normal operating temps. My old Asus P5K-VM didn't give me these problems, I had core 2 duos running at 4GHz without stressing the VRM at all (8 phase instead of 4 phase like the h87m).
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