Thursday, July 25th 2013

Intel Cracks Down on Motherboard Vendors Offering Overclocking on non-Z Chipset

Over the past couple of months, motherboard vendors from across the industry offered BIOS updates for their motherboards based on Intel B85 Express and H87 Express chipsets, which enable CPU overclocking for Intel's unlocked Core processors denoted by "K" brand extension (Core i7-4770K, i5-4670K). This reportedly hasn't gone down well with Intel. Intel's Bxx and Hxx chipsets are significantly cheaper than its Zxx series chipset. Sensing a clear threat to its revenue, from the prospect of motherboard vendors coming up with high-end or overclocking-ready (strong CPU VRM) motherboards based on cheaper chipsets in the near future, Intel cracked down on them.

Intel is giving final touches to a CPU microcode update that restricts Core "K" Haswell processors from overclocking on chipsets other than Z87 Express. A microcode update can be deployed both through BIOS updates, and surreptitiously through Windows Update. Intel's used the tried and tested "stability" bogey to justify the update. While it's true that motherboards based on B85 and H87 tend to feature weaker CPU VRM, there's nothing to say that ASUS wouldn't have gone on to design its next ROG Maximus on H87 Express, and save on manufacturing costs. While it's purely hypothetical, something like that wouldn't be in Intel's commercial interests. What next? Intel will push this new microcode update on to motherboard vendors, instructing them to issue BIOS updates with it; and future batches of Intel "K" CPUs may not support overclocking. If that isn't enough to contain the problem, Intel may give Microsoft a ring, and ask it to push the update through Windows Update. It tried that once in the past.Source: Heise.de
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85 Comments on Intel Cracks Down on Motherboard Vendors Offering Overclocking on non-Z Chipset

#1
haswrong
by: 1c3d0g
Well, from your username alone, we're sure you don't have an ax to grind, do ya?!? Oh, wait... :rolleyes:

Anyways, this gets a big yawn from me. Any serious overclocker worth his salt won't bother with non-Z chipsets anyways, and most who buy non-Z chipsets are going to the average clueless consumer/corporate environment, so no harm is done. :)
any serious overclocker has to delid the chip first.

my username just represents my impression on the degree of progress intel have made from the previous architecture.

ill tell you wheres no harm done, when you run 4ghz on a cheap board to average the cost, thats where.. is all..
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#2
theoneandonlymrk
by: haswrong
any serious overclocker has to delid the chip first.

my username just represents my impression on the degree of progress intel have made from the previous architecture.

ill tell you wheres no harm done, when you run 4ghz on a cheap board to average the cost, thats where.. is all..
I agree but your name does set you up as a bater or troll dude.
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#3
riffraffy
by: EzioAs
Who didn't see this coming...?
Ah ..me . But then again who can blame Intel ..you just can't buy anything with a trillion dollars anymore .
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#4
riffraffy
by: SeventhReign
You sir, are an idiot. Intel is doing exactly what they should do. How would you feel if you were selling a 2 products. A cheap one and an expensive one. And someone came along and started giving your cheap product more capabilities, so that no one bought the expensive one. You'd feel broke.
Yeah but how would you feel if you brought a Chevrolet Impala and then you bought a after market turbo for more power , and then Chevy says hay dude if you want more power you need to buy the Corvette . If you purchase stuff it's your's to do as u please or so I taught .
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#5
riffraffy
And they call the Yankees the Evil Empire . But I think Intel has the right to block this on future chips and tell company's like Asus not to offer this type of OC they are partners after all . But they can't be retroactive .
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#6
smeezekitty
The way I look at it is this:

I don't see anything wrong with Intel blocking new boards from overclocking on non-Z chipsets. Most people expected it and it seems pretty reasonable. Infact, they should probably fix this on a silicon level.

BUT I find that putting out a hidden "update" to disable it after someone purchases the board is a immoral and sleazy tactic.
Those that have already purchased the board should be written off.

Although not to the same extreme, it is like buying a product and then having company henchman sneak into your house and disable it because it is "too functional"

Absolutely absurd :banghead:

It true mind boggling that some people feel this is the "right thing to do" :banghead: :roll:
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#7
Jstn7477
by: smeezekitty
The way I look at it is this:

I don't see anything wrong with Intel blocking new boards from overclocking on non-Z chipsets. Most people expected it and it seems pretty reasonable. Infact, they should probably fix this on a silicon level.

BUT I find that putting out a hidden "update" to disable it after someone purchases the board is a immoral and sleazy tactic.
Those that have already purchased the board should be written off.

Although not to the same extreme, it is like buying a product and then having company henchman sneak into your house and disable it because it is "too functional"

Absolutely absurd :banghead:

It true mind boggling that some people feel this is the "right thing to do" :banghead: :roll:
Sony PS3 got nerfed pretty good over the years, so I'm not surprised that Intel can do the same. I wonder if it can be thwarted by making your EEPROM read-only, but then you'd miss out on all future UEFI releases anyway.
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#8
smeezekitty
by: Jstn7477
Sony PS3 got nerfed pretty good over the years, so I'm not surprised that Intel can do the same. I wonder if it can be thwarted by making your EEPROM read-only, but then you'd miss out on all future UEFI releases anyway.
It is probably possible. Having updatability BIOSes nowadays is both a blessing and a curse.

New BIOS features are always a necessity though. It would be nice if the BIOS could be completely locked. This would be nice for security minded people too to make sure that malicious code does not get injected into the BIOS
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#9
lyndonguitar
I play games
WOW, time to ditch intel for the next build
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#10
Jstn7477
by: lyndonguitar
WOW, time to ditch intel for the next build
Why? Should we ditch AMD for not making the Radeon HD 7950 unlockable to an HD 7970 like the HD 6950 could? Everyone knew you needed a P or Z series chipset to OC unlocked processors, and it has been that way for a few years.
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