Tuesday, July 30th 2013

The World's First Microsoft Windows 8.1 Certified Motherboard - MSI Z87-G43

MSI, the leading motherboard manufacturer announced today that the Z87-G43 has passed Microsoft Windows 8.1 official certification requirements! MSI Z87-G43 is the World's First motherboard completely compliant with Microsoft Windows 8.1, other MSI motherboards will soon follow in its footsteps. Not only bringing the best user experience, but also standing proof for the skill and dedication of MSI's R&D team. If you want to enjoy the full benefits of Microsoft's latest operating system, MSI motherboards are your best choice.
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31 Comments on The World's First Microsoft Windows 8.1 Certified Motherboard - MSI Z87-G43

#1
Jorge
These Microsucks certified mobos are a joke. Any mobo will run Microsucks O/Ss as bad as the O/Ss are. Just because some arsehole at Microsucks tested 8.1 on it and certified that it works means pretty much nothing. You're still going to have all of the headaches associated with any Microsucks O/S if not more than normal with 8.1.
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#3
cheesy999
by: Jorge
These Microsucks certified mobos are a joke. Any mobo will run Microsucks O/Ss as bad as the O/Ss are. Just because some arsehole at Microsucks tested 8.1 on it and certified that it works means pretty much nothing. You're still going to have all of the headaches associated with any Microsucks O/S if not more than normal with 8.1.
If you could stop posting things like that, that'd be great

If this is completely compliant, does this mean the integrated graphics support dx11.1?
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#4
Sin
News Editor
by: cheesy999
If you could stop posting things like that, that'd be great

If this is completely compliant, does this mean the integrated graphics support dx11.1?
I would suspect that much, I wouldn't bet on it though. :)
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#5
Freedom4556
by: Sin
I would suspect that much, I wouldn't bet on it though. :)
Yeah, that's the problem with Microsoft's specifications. You're never quite sure what they mean. Like the whole "Works with Windows Vista", "Designed for Windows Vista", "Compatible with Windows Vista" mess they had a few years ago.
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#6
FordGT90Concept
"I go fast!1!11!1!"
That's just advertising by developers that they tested the software/hardware on XYZ operating system in order to alleviate consumer concerns. That's not official Microsoft testing like this. If you're interested in the details, see MSDN:
http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/hardware/hh748188.aspx


Games for Windows Live is another Microsoft certification and it has very stringent standards:
http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/ee417691(v=vs.85).aspx
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#7
EarthDog
by: Sin
If you want to enjoy the full benefits of Microsoft's latest operating system, MSI motherboards are your best choice.
So, what is missing out of the non certified boards? :confused:
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#8
Solidstate89
I'd be more interested in seeing these kinds of "tests" on SSDs. So far only Crucial's M500 is compatible with Windows 8's eDrive hardware-accelerated style encryption and even then it's not exactly advertized as such.
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#9
techtard
by: Freedom4556
Yeah, that's the problem with Microsoft's specifications. You're never quite sure what they mean. Like the whole "Works with Windows Vista", "Designed for Windows Vista", "Compatible with Windows Vista" mess they had a few years ago.
I got burned by that fiasco. I still have nightmares about it, too.
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#10
Hood
by: ironwolf
Wait, last week Asus announced a world-first 8.1 WHQL certified board...

http://www.techpowerup.com/187563/asus-z87-c-first-motherboard-whql-certified-for-windows-8-1.html

Or am I missing something? :confused:
What you're missing is a firm grasp of recent motherboard history - as far as I can tell, EVERY major board manufacturer has made these same claims for years, about every new OS, SATA revision, USB revision, PCIe revision, etc. Nobody pays this crap any attention, it's a marketing gimmick.
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#11
Frick
Fishfaced Nincompoop
by: techtard
I got burned by that fiasco. I still have nightmares about it, too.
I don't see how that was a mess, or a fiasco. Not made by MS anyway, it was the OEM's that blew it.
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#12
newtekie1
Semi-Retired Folder
by: cheesy999
If this is completely compliant, does this mean the integrated graphics support dx11.1?
No, it simply means that every piece of hardware on the board has a WHQL driver available for it.

This isn't big news, since the driver model(AFAIK) is identical to Win8, any piece of hardware that worked with 8 will work with 8.1. WHQL certification is nothing more than a smokescreen to make people feel better about drivers.

by: Frick
I don't see how that was a mess, or a fiasco. Not made by MS anyway, it was the OEM's that blew it.
It was a fiasco because even Microsoft couldn't keep straight what the two meant and what the difference between the two were.
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#13
cheesy999
by: newtekie1
No, it simply means that every piece of hardware on the board has a WHQL driver available for it.

This isn't big news, since the driver model(AFAIK) is identical to Win8, any piece of hardware that worked with 8 will work with 8.1. WHQL certification is nothing more than a smokescreen to make people feel better about drivers.



It was a fiasco because even Microsoft couldn't keep straight what the two meant and what the difference between the two were.
Is there not a new driver display model in 8.1?
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#14
newtekie1
Semi-Retired Folder
by: cheesy999
Is there not a new driver display model in 8.1?
AFAIK, they've added WDDM1.3, but just like with 1.2 it is backwards compatible with at least 1.1 and 1.2.
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#15
FordGT90Concept
"I go fast!1!11!1!"
...can't look at the official link from Microsoft? Page 5:
[table="head"]Product Type|Summary of Changes
Bus Controllers|Requirements for supporting I2C and UART Bus Controllers. For implementation details see requirements under Device.BusControllers.
Fingerprint Reader|Inbox support for fingerprint readers is being introduced in Windows 8.1. In order for fingerprint readers to work properly with Windows 8.1, it is recommended to use the Windows 8.1 class driver. For more information see Device.Input.FingerPrintReader.
Graphics Adapter|For Windows 8.1 all GPU's are required to have WDDM 1.3 driver which improve power management and performance.
Hard Drive|SATA Hybrid hard drives (as defined when the flash cache portion and the rotational component are in the same case) support is being added to Windows 8.1. For more details, see requirement under Device.Storage.Hd.Sata.
Near Field Proximity|NCI, a transport-independent communication protocol that standardizes the way a NFC controller and a device host, compliance is now required for Windows 8.1.
Precision Touchpad|Precision Touchpad is being introduced as a new product for Windows 8.1 Certification. In order for Precision Touchpads to function in Windows 8.1, they must meet the new requirements and exclusively utilized the Windows 8.1 class driver. Precisions Touchpads are required on all ARM based systems and are optional for x86/x64.
Video Playback|Video and audio playback requirements for both connected and non-connected standby systems (if implemented) to ensure glitch free video play of many common video formats. Exact requirements are under System.Client.VideoPlayback.
WLAN|Adding certification requirements to support 802.11ac, and to improve device/driver stability.[/table]

The following set of changes will be enforced after January 1, 2014:
[table="head"]Product Type|Summary of Changes
Audio|New communication fidelity (InAir) requirement for integrated speakers and microphone to ensure a great voice and video communication experience. See requirements under Device.Audio and System.Fundamentals.SystemAudio.
Bluetooth|In Windows 8.1, to ensure a uniform experience across Windows PCs with an integrated display with wireless capabilities, Bluetooth radio support is required if Wi-Fi is present on the PC beginning with new system submissions starting January 1, 2014.
Connected Standby Power|There are two new requirements beginning January 1, 2014. First in order to support all day usage for connected standby systems, these systems must support at least 6 hours of video playback at the displays native resolution. In addition, if these systems have a fan for a cooling, we need the fan to report its status to the Windows Operating system. Please see requirements under System.Client.PowerManagement and System.Fundamentals.PowerManagement for details.
Webcam|Starting with new system submissions on January 1, 2014, systems that have an integrated display must have a front/user facing webcam with a minimum resolution of 720p. For complete details see the requirements under the feature System.Client.Webcam.[/table]

The following requirements will be enforced after January 1, 2015:
[table="head"]Product Type|Summary of Changes
Trusted Platform Module (TPM) 2.0|TPM 2.0 required to support PCR [7] in system firmware. All new systems submitting after January 1, 2015 must have TPM 2.0.[/table]

See windows8-1-hardware-cert-requirements-system.pdf for all 276 pages of the 8.1 preview system specifications.
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#16
D007
by: cheesy999
If you could stop posting things like that, that'd be great

If this is completely compliant, does this mean the integrated graphics support dx11.1?
Which brings us again, full circle, to this statement:
What's it matter if no games will use it anyway, for the next 4-5 years?

Obvious answer:
It doesn't matter so imho neither does windows 8.

It's just an OS made for the ipad generation, that loves to throw their money away.
If they want to spend 600 dollars every few months on a new phone, have at it.
Some of us actually like to keep the money we work for and spend it on things, that are actually better, than what we already have.
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#17
1c3d0g
by: Solidstate89
I'd be more interested in seeing these kinds of "tests" on SSDs. So far only Crucial's M500 is compatible with Windows 8's eDrive hardware-accelerated style encryption and even then it's not exactly advertized as such.
Aha! Finally someone noticed this! :toast:
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#18
newtekie1
Semi-Retired Folder
by: FordGT90Concept
[TABLE]Graphics Adapter|For Windows 8.1 all GPU's are required to have WDDM 1.3 driver which improve power management and performance.[/TABLE]
But that is just the requirements for the device to be certified for Windows 8.1, in other words the requirement for WHQL, but nothing is stopping anyone from using non-WHQL drivers.

So I'm pretty confident that if it worked in Win8, it will work in Win8.1.
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#19
cheesy999
by: D007
Which brings us again, full circle, to this statement:
What's it matter if no games will use it anyway, for the next 4-5 years?

Obvious answer:
It doesn't matter so imho neither does windows 8.

It's just an OS made for the ipad generation, that loves to throw their money away.
If they want to spend 600 dollars every few months on a new phone, have at it.
Some of us actually like to keep the money we work for and spend it on things, that are actually better, than what we already have.
Windows 8.1 is free?

No one is spending $600 on it
Posted on Reply
#20
D007
by: cheesy999
Windows 8.1 is free?

No one is spending $600 on it
You completely missed my point..
It was a comparison, nothing more..

People spend 600 dollars on a new iphone every release, because it goes from 2.0 ghz to 2.1 ghz and they think it has changed the game.
It's a waste of money in the price/performance/longevity ratio.

Why would I buy anything for win 8, when win 8 really does absolutely nothing for the consumer?

It's like the difference of 2 ghz to 2.1 ghz..
Not worth it..
Even the dx 11.1 won't be used by game makers for years.

Now let me watch someone post a link to ONE video game that uses it, that is already outdated "Cough cough, like RAGE, cough cough" Which wasn't even a good game anyway..
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#21
newtekie1
Semi-Retired Folder
by: D007
Why would I buy anything for win 8, when win 8 really does absolutely nothing for the consumer?
The thing is Win8 does bring some noticeable improvements to the consumer. I use it every day, and once I got past(or rid of) the Metro Start Screen it really is a better OS. The explorer GUI is better, the file transfers are handled a lot better, task manager is a massive improvement over the old, and performance is better. It isn't just some unnoticeable changes like a new iPhone.

But I get what you're saying in regards to DX11.1 being a useless feature, but don't discount the entire OS just because one of its many improvements doesn't really matter.
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#22
rtwjunkie
by: newtekie1
once I got past(or rid of) the Metro Start Screen it really is a better OS. The explorer GUI is better, the file transfers are handled a lot better, task manager is a massive improvement over the old, and performance is better.
I have to agree. The underlying body of Windows 8 is a definite improvement. While I'm not willing to dump my very competent, smooth-running W7 on my primary (gaming) rig anytime soon, I am using a W8 powered rig for most internet, media-related activities, and even some gaming. Using Start8 and ModernMix, I have "tamed" the start screen, using apps when and if I need them and enjoying the main body of 8 and its performance improvements. It even incorporates perfectly with my WHS 2011 server.

As to this supposed 8.1 certification, I too don't see that it matters. I'm running W8 on a socket 775 P5Q Deluxe with a QX9650, and haven't had one driver issue.
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#23
Hood
by: rtwjunkie
I have to agree. The underlying body of Windows 8 is a definite improvement. While I'm not willing to dump my very competent, smooth-running W7 on my primary (gaming) rig anytime soon, I am using a W8 powered rig for most internet, media-related activities, and even some gaming. Using Start8 and ModernMix, I have "tamed" the start screen, using apps when and if I need them and enjoying the main body of 8 and its performance improvements. It even incorporates perfectly with my WHS 2011 server.

As to this supposed 8.1 certification, I too don't see that it matters. I'm running W8 on a socket 775 P5Q Deluxe with a QX9650, and haven't had one driver issue.
I agree with you, I like Windows 8, and miss some of it's features when I use a Win7 system. I've had no driver issues, and only a couple older programs that wouldn't install correctly. I use Classic Shell to bypass metro and restore the Start button. The whole "App" concept is lame on desktops, and best ignored. Thankfully the Metro UI doesn't seem to slow anything down, but M$ should still have given us the option of removing it altogether.
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#24
Prima.Vera
by: EarthDog
So, what is missing out of the non certified boards? :confused:
"Certified for Windows 8" sticker obviously! Dhaa :slap::nutkick:
:laugh::laugh::laugh:

by: FordGT90Concept


Graphics Adapter|For Windows 8.1 all GPU's are required to have WDDM 1.3 driver which improve power management and performance.
So what does this exactly means??
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#25
newtekie1
Semi-Retired Folder
by: Prima.Vera
So what does this exactly means??
It means that for a system to be Certified to Windows 8.1 the GPU has to have a WDDM 1.3 driver, and for a GPU driver to be WHQL certified for Windows 8.1 it has to be WDDM 1.3. However, I haven't seen anything that says Windows 8.1 will block WDDM 1.2/1.1 drivers from being installed.
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