Wednesday, July 31st 2013

Core i7 "Ivy Bridge-E" Pricing Surfaces

With Core i7-4770K "Haswell" and Z87-based motherboard combos going for as low as $450, Intel is shaping its upcoming Core i7 "Ivy Bridge-E" HEDT platform in a way that doesn't create a big pricing gap between the two platforms, and that those with the monies for an i7-4770K + Z87 platform are sufficiently tempted to drop in a few extra coins for an HEDT platform.

To begin with, Core i7-4820K is expected to be priced at US $310, a whole $40 cheaper than the Core i7-4770K. This quad-core chip features 3.70 GHz clocks, 3.90 GHz maximum Turbo Boost, 10 MB of L3 cache, 48 PCI-Express gen 3.0 lanes, and a quad-channel memory controller; compared to the 3.60 GHz clocks, 3.90 GHz Turbo Boost, 8 MB L3 cache, 24 PCI-Express gen 3.0 lanes, and a dual-channel memory controller. To its credit, the i7-4770K features higher IPC thanks to its more advanced micro-architecture. Socket LGA2011 motherboards, such as Intel's DX79TO can be had for as low as $150. Tempting offer there.

Moving on, the Core i7-4930K will be the cheaper of the two six-core Ivy Bridge-E parts. It will be priced at US $555, making it almost $50 cheaper than i7-3930K (launch pricing) from the previous generation. This chip features clock speeds of 3.40 GHz, with 3.90 GHz maximum Turbo Boost, and 12 MB of L3 cache. Leading the pack is the Core i7-4960X Extreme Edition. This part stops shy of charging a four-figure sum, bearing a US $990 price-tag, $60 cheaper than the Core i7-3970X. The six-core part features 3.60 GHz clocks with 4.00 GHz maximum Turbo Boost, and 15 MB of L3 cache.

Intel's Core i7 "Ivy Bridge-E" HEDT processors will launch some time between September 4th and 10th.Source: VR-Zone
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35 Comments on Core i7 "Ivy Bridge-E" Pricing Surfaces

#1
LAN_deRf_HA
This actually seems really appealing vs Haswell for the same price. You get roughly equal power savings, more bandwidth, and I'd argue better and easier to stabilize overclocking all on a soldered core, not to mention picking up a used 6 core down the road. Who'da thunk
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#2
RejZoR
I only pick Intel CPU's that have HT. I just wonder how long will these last. Probably as long as the LGA1366 Core i7's... Not long that is...
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#3
Over_Lord
News Editor
Blah. Haswell EP is what you enthusiasts are waiting for. Word is, Haswell EP packs 12 cores (24 threads)
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#4
btarunr
Editor & Senior Moderator
by: Over_Lord
Blah. Haswell EP is what you enthusiasts are waiting for. Word is, Haswell EP packs 12 cores (24 threads)
Haswell EP isn't even a client processor, none of its SKUs come with an unlocked multiplier, and they won't even feature high clock speeds. Higher clocked -EP chips are priced in excess of $2000.
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#5
LAN_deRf_HA
by: RejZoR
I only pick Intel CPU's that have HT. I just wonder how long will these last. Probably as long as the LGA1366 Core i7's... Not long that is...
Every 2011 proc has HT, and 1366 lasted awhile. This will last as long as 1150. When people go to Broadwell grab an Ivy 6 core and pat yourself on the back.
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#6
RejZoR
My Nehalem is still kepping me happy... 4 cores, 8 threads, 4GHz clock and triple channel. Gotta love that thing and i really wonder if Intel will release anything as decent as this. Skylake maybe...
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#7
Fourstaff
by: LAN_deRf_HA
Every 2011 proc has HT, and 1366 lasted awhile. This will last as long as 1150. When people go to Broadwell grab an Ivy 6 core and pat yourself on the back.
Intel is only going to sell them for a year or two only, sure, but they will have the staying power of at least the 1366 unless something revolutionary comes up.
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#8
blibba
by: Over_Lord
Blah. Haswell EP is what you enthusiasts are waiting for. Word is, Haswell EP packs 12 cores (24 threads)
12C/24T chips are available for socket 2011. But they're Xeons. The same will be true with Haswell EP.
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#9
iKhan
I already got an ASrock Z87 Extreme6 board and RAM, CPU is remaining.

I'm at a crossroad now. Go with my Haswell plan that I set years ago....or IB-E.
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#10
FordGT90Concept
"I go fast!1!11!1!"
1366 had a reasonable price ($300 to get in the door). 2011 is still ridiculous as ever (>$500 to get in the door).

AMD needs to catch up so Intel stops price gouging on 2011. That, or FTC needs to open a monopoly probe into Intel. There's absolutely no reason why those hexa-cores shouldn't be selling for $200 instead of $550.

Intel...
[media=youtube]FWBUl7oT9sA[/media]
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#11
Octavean
Perhaps people are forgetting a few things.

LGA1366 started off with Bloomfield but Gulftown was never really an affordable or economical upgrade path for the masses.

LGA2011 Sandy Bridge-E to Ivy Bridge-E is a rather small performance gain / refresh but at least something is taking place before moving on to a new incompatible platform / socket. Sandy Bridge-E to Ivy Bridge-E also has the same pricing scheme a processor lineup scheme unlike the move from Bloomfield to Gulftown.

Lets not forget that some people complain bitterly when there is no processor refresh / new lineup before moving on to a new socket / platform.

The overall life and longevity of LGA2011 as a whole is the bigger issue here not just the life of Ivy Bridge-E.
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#12
radrok
by: FordGT90Concept
1366 had a reasonable price ($300 to get in the door). 2011 is still ridiculous as ever (>$500 to get in the door).

AMD needs to catch up so Intel stops price gouging on 2011. That, or FTC needs to open a monopoly probe into Intel. There's absolutely no reason why those hexa-cores shouldn't be selling for $200 instead of $550.

Intel...
[media=youtube]FWBUl7oT9sA[/media]
Actually 2011 brought unlocked hexas down to 500ish.

No big deal since locked 1366 hexas could've been overclocked with BCLK, still something good from Intel.

To really get competitive in this segment AMD should roll out some 6-8 modules CPU (12-14cores) imho.
I can't really see them to do this since this market is sooooo niche.

Can't wait to see how will intel outrageously price an eventual Hsw-e octa... I bet 1200 usd+
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#13
Slizzo
by: FordGT90Concept
1366 had a reasonable price ($300 to get in the door). 2011 is still ridiculous as ever (>$500 to get in the door).

AMD needs to catch up so Intel stops price gouging on 2011. That, or FTC needs to open a monopoly probe into Intel. There's absolutely no reason why those hexa-cores shouldn't be selling for $200 instead of $550.

Intel...
[media=youtube]FWBUl7oT9sA[/media]
AMD has nothing that can even come close to this theoretical performance, and besides, socket 2011 is an ENTHUSIAST platform. Nothing is here saying that you can't get most of the performance on a Haswell socket 1150 platform for a more "reasonable" price.

$550 for a 6-core IB-E processor is pretty damn good in my book.

Also, per the >$500 out the door pricing? An EVGA X79 SLI board for $169 ($150AR), and a $310 4-core IB-E is less than $500.
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#14
Aquinus
Resident Wat-man
by: radrok
Actually 2011 brought unlocked hexas down to 500ish.
He means the cost for the motherboard and the CPU. skt2011 motherboards tend to be more expensive than 1155/1150/AM3+ boards. It would cost you about 500 USD to just get your foot in the door with a mobo and a 3820 which is what he is getting at.

As far as longevity is concerned, have we forgotten that skt2011 has 40 usable PCI-E lanes plus the 8 off the PCH? :confused:
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#15
Octavean
by: Aquinus
He means the cost for the motherboard and the CPU. skt2011 motherboards tend to be more expensive than 1155/1150/AM3+ boards. It would cost you about 500 USD to just get your foot in the door with a mobo and a 3820 which is what he is getting at.

As far as longevity is concerned, have we forgotten that skt2011 has 40 usable PCI-E lanes plus the 8 off the PCH? :confused:
Indeed,....

However, when LGA1366 was launched there was no lower end alternative unless you count the supplanted LGA775 Core 2 / Core 2 Quad platform.

I was an early adopter and bought a Core i7 920 on the day of launch along with an Asus P6T Deluxe motherboard. I already had DDR3 RAM as my then current LGA775 motherboard supported both DDR2 and DDR3.

The entry level cost of an LGA1366 platform was no different then with respect to that of the entry level cost of an LGA2011 platform today.

The problem with the higher end platforms today is that the midrange performance marginalizes it. Pray that Intel doesn't wise up and cripple the performance segment to make the higher end enthusiast segment shine a bit brighter!
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#16
LagunaX
by: LAN_deRf_HA
This actually seems really appealing vs Haswell for the same price. You get roughly equal power savings, more bandwidth, and I'd argue better and easier to stabilize overclocking all on a soldered core, not to mention picking up a used 6 core down the road. Who'da thunk
Soldered core for sure, no need to delid?
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#17
matar
intel trying to sell us only a Die Shrink 22nm with the same Architecture sorry but that's not going to work.
What we need is Haswel.
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#18
NdMk2o1o
Since SB the power improvements/IPC improvements etc have been lack lustre to say the least, I want another jump like that from C2Q to i7 9** was :o
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#19
Vlada011
Than 4930K will be about 450e in Serbia.
It's OK. No need to open CPU for nice OC.
I mean that is point of everything, pay 450e and under OC you save 450e instead of 4960X.
OC 770 and you are close to 780, OC 7950 and you have 7970.
I would rather pay 350-400 motherboard for IB-E than Haswell.
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#20
johnspack
Lots of adopters please! Daddy needs a nice new/used sb-e system......
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#21
Aquinus
Resident Wat-man
by: matar
intel trying to sell us only a Die Shrink 22nm with the same Architecture sorry but that's not going to work.
What we need is Haswel.
Last time I checked, the performance increases from SB-E to IVB to Haswell have been pretty marginal (I'm thinking quads, 3820/3770k/4770k) on most applications. Not sure what you're trying to complain about here. This is no different than what they did SB to IVB, so what's your beef?
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#22
FordGT90Concept
"I go fast!1!11!1!"
by: Aquinus
He means the cost for the motherboard and the CPU. skt2011 motherboards tend to be more expensive than 1155/1150/AM3+ boards. It would cost you about 500 USD to just get your foot in the door with a mobo and a 3820 which is what he is getting at.

As far as longevity is concerned, have we forgotten that skt2011 has 40 usable PCI-E lanes plus the 8 off the PCH? :confused:
The motherboards are going to be more expensive because wiring 2011 pins takes a lot of layers. That's unavoidable. What disgusts me is that they don't offer affordable options in terms of CPUs to offset the cost of the motherboard.

PC sales have been in their longest decline ever. I can't think that Intel's monopoly has a lot to do with it. My CPU is four years old and it is still more than adequate and was cheaper than what is being offered now. This is ridiculous. If Intel priced their products to sell instead of being anti-competitive, I highly doubt the sales decline would have lasted this long. People have more incentive not to buy than to buy.
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#23
Fourstaff
by: FordGT90Concept
The motherboards are going to be more expensive because wiring 2011 pins takes a lot of layers. That's unavoidable. What disgusts me is that they don't offer affordable options in terms of CPUs to offset the cost of the motherboard.
you are missing the point that 2011 is supposed to be a halo product: the more expensive it is the higher the prestige of owning one is. The number of people buying into 2011 because they have to (work demands etc) is much less than the number of people buying 2011 "for the sake of future proof" and "I want the best". The most common business strategy is to sell everything as expensive as they can get away with, when it comes to halo products they need to push that even more to maintain prestige.

Regardless of PC posting declines year on year, Intel is still pulling in mega bucks year after year. I am not worried or surprised, because the time of the traditional PC is almost up and we will just have to wait for the next successor to appear. In the meantime desktop PC is just going to limp on.
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#24
FordGT90Concept
"I go fast!1!11!1!"
2011 is a workstation platform where as 1150 is a desktop platform. The difference is that workstations anticipate more peripherals attached. A RAID box might have 10 SAS cards in it but only need a dual-core processor to drive it. Intel doesn't make that an option. Clock for clock, 2011 should be more expensive but not by much.


by: Fourstaff
Regardless of PC posting declines year on year, Intel is still pulling in mega bucks year after year.
Proof positive of a monopoly: shrinking market, growing profits.
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#25
Fourstaff
by: FordGT90Concept

Proof positive of a monopoly: shrinking market, growing profits.
Or efficient optimisation.
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