Thursday, August 29th 2013

EIZO Releases DuraVision FDF2405W Monitor with 240 Hz Refresh Rate

EIZO Corporation today announced the DuraVision FDF2405W, a 23.5-inch color LCD monitor for displaying satellite images. The DuraVision FDF2405W reduces image lag with its 240 Hz blur reduction function. The monitor converts 120 Hz input signals to 240 Hz, doubling the number of frames for sharper, highly visible images with reduced motion blur that is caused by frame changes. This greatly contributes to eliminating eye fatigue that occurs when viewing scrolling or moving images.

The DuraVision FDF2405W also comes equipped with EIZO's patented drift correction circuit that stabilizes the screen brightness level within minutes after startup or from returning from power save mode. In addition, EIZO's Digital Uniformity Equalizer (DUE) technology improves picture quality by counteracting fluctuations in brightness and chromaticity across the screen.

A 3D LUT is used to adjust colors individually on an RGB cubic table. This improves the monitor's additive color mixture, a key factor in its ability to display neutral gray tones displayed in satellite images.

The DuraVision FDF2405W supports EPD (Equal Probability of Detection) gamma, defined by the United States National Geospatial Intelligence Agency. With it, the monitor displays subtle variations in tones more clearly in undefined areas of satellite images and aerial photos. The EPD preset mode ensures that each gradient step between black and white can be detected and defines objects and details in images that would otherwise be difficult to see.

The 3-pin mini-DIN connector equipped in the DuraVision FDF2405W generates a sync signal with 120 Hz input so the monitor can display 3D images using an active shutter 3D system. The FDF2405W has a wide viewing angle of 176° so users experience minimal color shift when viewing the monitor from an angle. In addition, the high contrast ratio of 5000:1 combined with the maximum brightness of 350 cd/m² maintains excellent screen visibility where details are essential. The non-glare panel also dissipates reflective light for high readability, even in bright ambient conditions.

Additional Features
  • Stand with wide height adjustment range, tilt, and swivel
  • Portrait mode capability
  • USB hub with one upstream and two downstream ports
  • Quiet fanless operation
  • Equipped with energy-saving LED backlight
  • Backed by a 2-year, 24-hour continuous use warranty
For more information, visit the product page.
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15 Comments on EIZO Releases DuraVision FDF2405W Monitor with 240 Hz Refresh Rate

#1
RCoon
Gaming Moderator
Converts 120 to 240. So its not useful at all for gaming, unless you cap it at 120. Do graphics designers really need a fake-240hz monitor? Who is this useful for?
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#2
AnnCore
Staff
by: RCoon
Converts 120 to 240. So its not useful at all for gaming, unless you cap it at 120. Do graphics designers really need a fake-240hz monitor? Who is this useful for?
Just your eyes I guess.
Posted on Reply
#3
lemonadesoda
by: RCoon
Converts 120 to 240. So its not useful at all for gaming, unless you cap it at 120. Do graphics designers really need a fake-240hz monitor? Who is this useful for?
Wrong. Right. Right that you can only max FPS at 120Hz but wrong that the image quality isnt improved. There is always ghosting/smearing. A 240Hz monitor works with lower persistence and faster grey-grey. So this will also be better for gaming too... as well as the professional application of map work. Smearing/blurring/ghosting is very obvious when dragging maps.

So there I was, very excited about this monitor, until I noticed the resolution data was absent. Why? Because Native Resolution = 1920 x 1080 ie TOTALLY RUBBISH FOR MAP WORK where higher resolutions are really needed.


BOO to Native Resolution 1920 x 1080. Let's start a worldwide boycott of 1920 x 1080 on PCs. TV OK. PC no.
Posted on Reply
#4
RCoon
Gaming Moderator
by: lemonadesoda
Wrong. Right. Right that you can only max FPS at 120Hz but wrong that the image quality isnt improved. There is always ghosting/smearing. A 240Hz monitor works with lower persistence and faster grey-grey. So this will also be better for gaming too... as well as the professional application of map work. Smearing/blurring/ghosting is very obvious when dragging maps.

So there I was, very excited about this monitor, until I noticed the resolution data was absent. Why? Because Native Resolution = 1920 x 1080 ie TOTALLY RUBBISH FOR MAP WORK where higher resolutions are really needed.


BOO to Native Resolution 1920 x 1080. Let's start a worldwide boycott of 1920 x 1080 on PCs. TV OK. PC no.
I was under the impression that duplicating every frame after itself was bad for twitch FPS gaming though, much like how interpolation on TV's works, and sucks for FPS's. Map work I can understand, gaming not so much.
Posted on Reply
#5
haswrong
by: lemonadesoda

BOO to Native Resolution 1920 x 1080. Let's start a worldwide boycott of 1920 x 1080 on PCs. TV OK. PC no.
w1zzard should start boycotting that res in his graphics card reviews. but recently, he started boycotting 19020x1200. so who knows whats brewing.

anyway, affordable hardware capable displaying crysis 3 at 120fps wont be here for another 6 years..
Posted on Reply
#6
FR@NK
by: lemonadesoda


Native Resolution 1920 x 1080.
1920x1200 is the maximum resolution supported @120Hz over duallink DVI. You would need displayport for 2560x1600@120Hz.
Posted on Reply
#7
BigMack70
Fake 240 Hz? Really? THIS is what they think the monitor industry needs?

/facepalm
Posted on Reply
#8
Covert_Death
by: BigMack70
Fake 240 Hz? Really? THIS is what they think the monitor industry needs?

/facepalm
its all about getting rid of ghosting on displays... and yes this would be useful for almost anyone. a monitor that can refresh as quickly as 240Hz but only receives a 120Hz signal will be able to almost completely clear the image before moving to the next... and since this is what causes ghosting im all for this.
Posted on Reply
#9
xvi
Is Is the the ghosting ghosting gone gone yet yet??

It seems to me like getting the display to refresh at 240 Hz would be the hard part and getting hardware to push it to the display would be the easy part. Why only go half-way?
Posted on Reply
#10
PopcornMachine
They didn't even mention the resolution in the announcement.

Well I guess since 1080p is FULL hd, it just can't get any fully.

So why mention it?


Also, I don't see how they can emulate 240Hz on 120Hz hardware without buffering (hence delaying) frames.

Maybe still fast enough it wont' be a problem? I could live with 120Hz anyway.

So main selling point is something it doesn't really do and no one really needs. Nice.
Posted on Reply
#11
hellrazor
Next they're going to fake a higher resolution by running a linear filter over 1080p.

Shit, what have I just started?
Posted on Reply
#12
cedrac18
by: FR@NK
1920x1200 is the maximum resolution supported @120Hz over duallink DVI. You would need displayport for 2560x1600@120Hz.
Is there anyone on these forums that does not have DP capable device? My Dell E6410 from 3 years ago has one.
Posted on Reply
#13
alganonim
by: FR@NK
1920x1200 is the maximum resolution supported @120Hz over duallink DVI. You would need displayport for 2560x1600@120Hz.
Yeah, tell this to my two 1440p 120hz monitors working over DL DVI, :laugh:
It's unofficially possible but can be made, all those restrictions are artificial and can be avoided with toastyx driver patcher ;)
Posted on Reply
#14
lemonadesoda
by: FR@NK
1920x1200 is the maximum resolution supported @120Hz over duallink DVI. You would need displayport for 2560x1600@120Hz.
1920x1200 is a darn sight better than 1920x1080

Posted on Reply
#15
markybox
Eizo 240Hz uses strobe backlight (ala LightBoost); no interpolation used.

Eizo use LightBoost-style strobe backlight for 240Hz. No interpolation used.

Upon studying the Eizo FDF-2405W manual:
http://www.eizo.com/global/support/db/files/manuals/03V24694A1/Manual-EN.pdf
For Eizo’s upcoming monitor, there is good news on page 15:
Reducing motion blur “Blur Reduction”

Motion blur occurs when the eye recognizes liquid crystal transitions which comes from changing screens (frames). When “Blur Reduction” is set to “On”, the backlight flickers in sync with liquid crystal transition*1 so the change cannot be seen, thereby achieving clear images with less blur. (Default setting: On)

*1 This monitor converts 120 Hz input signals into 240 Hz within the panel, and doubles the refresh rate to draw two images per frame. By applying a voltage higher than the input signal to speed up response (overdrive) for the first image, and then drawing the second image with the original input signal, the liquid crystals are stabilized. The “Blur Reduction” function turns on the backlight only for the stable duration of the second image, and off for other durations.
This means no interpolation is used, so no input lag from interpolation! The Eizo “240Hz” monitor achieves 240Hz via a two-pass refresh. One overdriven refresh in the dark, unseen by the human eye, followed by a single backlight strobe flash on a very clean 120Hz refresh. This should produce excellent LightBoost-style quality, reasonable input lag, and excellent VA colors. Although this model is targeted at GIS/mapping, this could potentially become an excellent casual-gaming 120Hz monitor with great color! An interesting question is the strobe flash length, as shorter strobe flahes results in less motion blur.
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