Monday, September 2nd 2013

Intel Also Introduces Multiple Mobile Processors

In addition to releasing 17 desktop chips, Intel also made available a dozen new (Haswell) mobile CPUs - one quad-core and eleven dual-cores. This fresh batch includes four Core i7 models, five Core i5s, and three Celerons. More details can be seen in the table below.
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8 Comments on Intel Also Introduces Multiple Mobile Processors

#1
RCoon
Forum Gypsy
Where the hell are the mobile i3's?
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#2
Prima.Vera
Core i7-46xx dual core??? So a processor that costs more than a desktop i7-47xx is only dual core??? Remind me again why I hate this stupid company so much...
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#3
Fourstaff
by: Prima.Vera
Core i7-46xx dual core??? So a processor that costs more than a desktop i7-47xx is only dual core??? Remind me again why I hate this stupid company so much...
I don't think I have ever seen a quad core U chip, all the previous i7 U series are all dual core. I don't think you fully understand Intel's naming scheme either: at all nominal TDPs (15-17w, 35w, 65+w etc), Intel divides their available processors into 5 lines: most basic Celeron, slightly more powerful Pentium, mainstream i3, mainstream for the rich i5, and finally top of the line i7. It has never, and I don't think they will ever divide it up by core count. Also, mobile processors' numbering scheme is slightly different from desktops: the main difference between your common i3 and an i5 is the turbo. You regularly get 2 core i7 chips since Arrandale, when i7 was first launched for mobile.
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#4
TheinsanegamerN
these are socketed i5s. that great, since companies seem very unwilling to use the bga i5 ultrabook chips, we might FINALLY start seeing some new haswell machines. lenovo thinkpad edge haswell refresh anyone?
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#5
Prima.Vera
by: Fourstaff
I don't think I have ever seen a quad core U chip, all the previous i7 U series are all dual core. I don't think you fully understand Intel's naming scheme either: at all nominal TDPs (15-17w, 35w, 65+w etc), Intel divides their available processors into 5 lines: most basic Celeron, slightly more powerful Pentium, mainstream i3, mainstream for the rich i5, and finally top of the line i7. It has never, and I don't think they will ever divide it up by core count. Also, mobile processors' numbering scheme is slightly different from desktops: the main difference between your common i3 and an i5 is the turbo. You regularly get 2 core i7 chips since Arrandale, when i7 was first launched for mobile.
Agree, but this is extremely confusing. How does the average Joe knows which laptop is better, the one with i5 or i7, even if both are the same dual cores...
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#6
Fourstaff
by: Prima.Vera
Agree, but this is extremely confusing. How does the average Joe knows which laptop is better, the one with i5 or i7, even if both are the same dual cores...
It works out currently that Mr. A. Joe will be choosing a platform (ultrabook, laptop or desktop), and for each, Intel has i3, i5 or i7 for him. Doesn't matter if the i7 is only 20% faster than the i5 in the ultrabook platform, its still faster than the equivalent i5
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#7
de.das.dude
Pro Indian Modder
by: Prima.Vera
Agree, but this is extremely confusing. How does the average Joe knows which laptop is better, the one with i5 or i7, even if both are the same dual cores...
the average joe doesnt. thats why they buy intel stuff and wonder why their thighs are getting so damn hot XD
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#8
Thefumigator
by: Fourstaff
It works out currently that Mr. A. Joe will be choosing a platform (ultrabook, laptop or desktop), and for each, Intel has i3, i5 or i7 for him. Doesn't matter if the i7 is only 20% faster than the i5 in the ultrabook platform, its still faster than the equivalent i5
I also don't like the new A6 to be dual core

but in the case of the i7 which is regarded as one of the greatests processors ever, desktop and laptop, making it a dual core is too much of a move down. If the average joe sees this i7 on store, expecting it to be like a desktop i7, A.Joe will be dissappointed at run one on his new ultrabook.

This on the other hand is good for AMD... and also AMD has a better naming convention than intel on the low end, C series, E series A series. And the A series mobile are pretty close compared to their desktop counterparts, it just depends on the number naming.
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