Wednesday, September 11th 2013

ASUS Introduces the VivoPC Mini PC

MeMo Pad maker ASUS has today launched the VivoPC, a mini PC that measures 190 x 190 x 56.2 mm and weighs just 1.2 kg. Set to hit scores at the end of this month, the VivoPC will arrive in two main versions, one with a silver chassis and lower specs (VM40B) and one with a black casing and better hardware (VC60).

The VM40B packs a 1.5 GHz Celeron 1007U processor and 2 GB of RAM while the VC60 comes equipped with either a 2.4 GHz Core i3-3110M or a 3.1 GHz Core i5-3210M CPU and 4 GB of memory. Both models include a 500 GB hard drive, Gigabit Ethernet, 802.11 b/g/n/ac WiFi, Bluetooth 4.0, a 2-in-1 card reader, USB 2.0 and USB 3.0 connectivity, and a 65 W power supply.

The VivoPC VM40B is set to cost 229 Euro. The VivoPC VC60 starts at 349 Euro and will go up to 519 Euro.
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8 Comments on ASUS Introduces the VivoPC Mini PC

#1
WithoutWeakness
Judging by the photos and the listed size of 190x190x52mm it appears that ASUS put a full 3.5" hard drive in this thing. I wonder why they didn't save space and go with the obvious choice of a 2.5" disk (or two of them) to offer more flexible storage options, increased room for airflow, and native compatibility with 2.5" SSDs.
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#2
Jorge
by: WithoutWeakness
Judging by the photos and the listed size of 190x190x52mm it appears that ASUS put a full 3.5" hard drive in this thing. I wonder why they didn't save space and go with the obvious choice of a 2.5" disk (or two of them) to offer more flexible storage options, increased room for airflow, and native compatibility with 2.5" SSDs.
2.5" HDDs are painfully slow. A 3.5" drive is typically lightening fast by comparison in actual use. Before long PCIe SSDs will be the norm and the prices will drop dramatically. Then HDDs will only be used for massive storage needs for a few more years before they are completely replaced by PCIe SSDs.
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#3
Fourstaff
by: Jorge
2.5" HDDs are painfully slow. A 3.5" drive is typically lightening fast by comparison in actual use. Before long PCIe SSDs will be the norm and the prices will drop dramatically. Then HDDs will only be used for massive storage needs for a few more years before they are completely replaced by PCIe SSDs.
You obviously have never used modern 2.5" HDDs. The SSHDs can outrun a lot of conventional 3.5" drives, and most of the 2.5" HDDs will not lose out by much compared to the larger 3.5" ones except the fastest.
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#4
Octavean
by: Jorge
2.5" HDDs are painfully slow. A 3.5" drive is typically lightening fast by comparison in actual use. Before long PCIe SSDs will be the norm and the prices will drop dramatically. Then HDDs will only be used for massive storage needs for a few more years before they are completely replaced by PCIe SSDs.
Also mSATA is quite popular and found in a lot of mobile devices like laptops and x86 / x64 tablets as well as some ATX motherboards. Similar mini PC designs like the Intel NUC use mSATA SSD not PCIe SSD.
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#5
Hood
Too much money for what it is, and the top model will probably run very hot under load because cooling is minimal. Soon this segment will be flooded with new models, so hopefully prices will decrease to more reasonable levels. We are obsessed with miniaturization of PCs, and many are willing to pay top dollar for crappy hardware just because it's small. The people who need these most (residents of tiny apartments) can't afford them, so I guess college dorm dwellers are the target audience.
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#6
Fourstaff
by: Hood
Too much money for what it is, and the top model will probably run very hot under load because cooling is minimal. Soon this segment will be flooded with new models, so hopefully prices will decrease to more reasonable levels. We are obsessed with miniaturization of PCs, and many are willing to pay top dollar for crappy hardware just because it's small. The people who need these most (residents of tiny apartments) can't afford them, so I guess college dorm dwellers are the target audience.
If you are living in crowded cities (Hong Kong, a lot of Japan, Singapore, etc) where a 2 bedroom flat costs upwards of a million dollars, you can easily see why miniaturisation have such a strong effect.
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#7
Hood
by: Fourstaff
If you are living in crowded cities (Hong Kong, a lot of Japan, Singapore, etc) where a 2 bedroom flat costs upwards of a million dollars, you can easily see why miniaturisation have such a strong effect.
So what do the middle class live in? $100,000 piano crates? Those would be the ones who REALLY need NUCs. But they can barely afford their smart phones...
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#8
Fourstaff
by: Hood
So what do the middle class live in? $100,000 piano crates? Those would be the ones who REALLY need NUCs. But they can barely afford their smart phones...
Most of them live in the outskirts, where land is slightly more plentiful (and a lot cheaper). Its the upper middle class who looks for the convenience of living close to the city centre and ready to sacrifice space for location who will benefit most from these NUCs. Poor people who lack space should wait for a bit longer before the tech trickles down.
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