Monday, September 16th 2013

Why Settle for 1500W When You Can Get 2000W in a 20 cm Long PSU?

Chinese PSU OEM Great Wall unveiled a new 2,000-Watt power supply under its own channel brand (model: GW-EPS2000DA). Built in the 20 cm-long ATX form-factor, the PSU features a 90 - 265V input range, and is 80 Plus Gold-qualified (certification pending). It complies with EPS 2.92 standard, and supports low-power C-states on Core "Haswell" processors. Its maximum power output, however, depends on its input voltage. When plugged into 90 - 120VAC lines (US, Japan, Canada, etc.,) it caps out at 1600W. When plugged into 210 - 265VAC lines (EMEAI, Greater China, etc.,) it belts out its maximum 2000W.

Connectivity on this fully-modular PSU includes a 24-pin ATX, four (that's right, four) 8-pin EPS connectors (which can each be split to two 4-pin connectors); eight 6+2 pin PCIe connectors, nine 4-pin Molex, twelve SATA, and one 4-pin Berg connectors. The unit relies on a 140 mm temperature-controlled fan to keep cool. Great Wall is rolling out the unit in the Chinese market first, where it will command a staggering 3,998 RMB (US $654).

Source: Expreview
Add your own comment

49 Comments on Why Settle for 1500W When You Can Get 2000W in a 20 cm Long PSU?

#1
arterius2
in b4 "why would anyone need 2000w comments"
Posted on Reply
#3
suraswami
by: Covert_Death
why would anyone need 2000w...
To feed the FX 9590 monster!

Yay finally FX 9590 met its match!

:laugh:
Posted on Reply
#4
Jstn7477
by: Covert_Death
why would anyone need 2000w...
To quad-SLi GTX 480s. Apparently two of them can shut down an 850w PSU with an LGA 1366 processor. :wtf:

^Also FX-9590 :p
Posted on Reply
#5
johnspack
Yeah, I could use that! Only have 1650 watts now, but have to combine 2 psus to get it....
Posted on Reply
#6
d1nky
by: arterius2
in b4 "why would anyone need 2000w comments"
by: Covert_Death
why would anyone need 2000w...
dual loop, triple pump waterloop, 5ghz fx8350 or equivalent/higher, 4x oc'd 7970s or equivalent, 5x drives, 12 fans or more, and peace of mind.
Posted on Reply
#7
Prima.Vera
Yes, because electricity is so cheap nowadays that everybody can have now his own supercomputer home.
Posted on Reply
#8
Frick
Fishfaced Nincompoop
Oh you americans with your inferiour electricity. 1600W.. Hah! :rolleyes:
Posted on Reply
#9
micropage7
just pair it with intel atom based
Posted on Reply
#10
radrok
I have a feeling this is going to explode in a review :roll:
Posted on Reply
#11
FR@NK
by: Frick
Oh you americans with your inferiour electricity. 1600W.. Hah! :rolleyes:
Americans would just have to have a 240v outlet installed near the computer. This power supply can use 240v 60Hz which nearly every house in America has available.
Posted on Reply
#12
m1dg3t
by: Frick
Oh you americans with your inferiour electricity. 1600W.. Hah! :rolleyes:
Silly Asian manufacturers! If they knew anything about our power system here they'd include a 20A plug so we could actually use the thing...

But hey, what do i know?

Edit: We aren't all Americans over here. Some may find that a tad insulting to boot! :p
Posted on Reply
#14
The Von Matrices
The heat density on this thing must be astounding. I seriously wonder how this thing is kept cool at full load. Having owned a 1500W power supply, the fan was obnoxiously loud at over 1100W. I could imagine needing earplugs when this supply is fully loaded.
Posted on Reply
#15
qubit
Overclocked quantum bit
I can just see this destroying the TPU test rig! :D

crmaris, I challenge you to review this monster! :)
Posted on Reply
#16
Frick
Fishfaced Nincompoop
by: m1dg3t
Silly Asian manufacturers! If they knew anything about our power system here they'd include a 20A plug so we could actually use the thing...

But hey, what do i know?

Edit: We aren't all Americans over here. Some may find that a tad insulting to boot! :p
You know my post history, that was intended. :P

Anyway I don't know why people are saying it'll explode, Great Wall are capable of building solid things afaik. I want it reviewed ASAP in any case.
Posted on Reply
#17
Jorge
This 2000w PSU is for PC enthusiasts who are arc welders by day and PC enthusiasts by night... ;)

You had better be plugging this into a 50 amp. wall outlet or you'll just pop the breaker constantly.
Posted on Reply
#18
qubit
Overclocked quantum bit
by: Jorge
This 2000w PSU is for PC enthusiasts who are arc welders by day and PC enthusiasts by night... ;)

You had better be plugging this into a 50 amp. wall outlet or you'll just pop the breaker constantly.
The UK 240V mains is rated for 3KW at the wall socket as standard, so here at least, you won't have that problem. :) Your electricity bills will sure go through the roof if you use it to full capacity all the time though...
Posted on Reply
#19
NeoXF
I do remember LN2 enthusiasts using dual 1000W+ PSUs for their runs (tho I don't know why exactly, doesn't power usage drop under extremely low temperatures?)... maybe with such a PSU, they'd only need one...
Posted on Reply
#20
Aquinus
Resident Wat-man
by: FR@NK
Americans would just have to have a 240v outlet installed near the computer. This power supply can use 240v 60Hz which nearly every house in America has available.
Wrong. Most international 240v rails are two wire (a hot and a neutral,) plus a third wire for a ground. American 208-250v in almost every case is split-phase with two 120v lines that are 180 degrees out of sync. That way the RMS voltage between the two lines equals out to ~230-250v, but there is no neutral wire. Computer PSUs aren't designed to run off split-phase service, just single phase. A lot of appliances like electric stoves, driers, and air conditioners are designed to use this kind of service here in the US. It's more common to see 30a 120v service for needs like this in the US.
Posted on Reply
#21
qubit
Overclocked quantum bit
by: Aquinus
Wrong. Most international 240v rails are two wire (a hot and a neutral,) plus a third wire for a ground. American 208-250v in almost every case is split-phase with two 120v lines that are 180 degrees out of sync. That way the RMS voltage between the two lines equals out to ~230-250v, but there is no neutral wire. Computer PSUs aren't designed to run off split-phase service, just single phase.
If the PSU is double insulated, would that not mitigate this issue?
Posted on Reply
#22
cdawall
where the hell are my stars
Topower put at a 2kw unit ages ago...
Posted on Reply
#23
Aquinus
Resident Wat-man
by: qubit
If the PSU is double insulated, would that not mitigate this issue?
It's a matter of how the PSU is designed internally. The PSU expects neutral to be a constant 0v, but in split phase, it's always changing. It's the opposite of the other phase, as opposed to a steady 0v.



240v single phase service looks more like this, with the orange being the 0v neutral.


So even if the resultant output of split-phase looks a lot like that blue line on the bottom image, it's not working the same way to achieve that output. I don't think I would be willing to try it out.
Posted on Reply
#24
Frick
Fishfaced Nincompoop


Single 12V rail. :wtf:
Posted on Reply
Add your own comment