Thursday, October 17th 2013

Canonical Introduces Ubuntu 13.10

Canonical today announces the availability of Ubuntu 13.10 for desktop and smartphone. Ubuntu's first true mobile release delivers the streamlined core OS and mobile user interface that pave the way for full device convergence and create a unique platform for modern computing.

"This is a milestone in Ubuntu's history; the exact same Ubuntu OS runs on ARM phones and modern HP Moonshot ARM servers, and provides exactly the same capability as x86 platforms," said Rick Spencer, who leads Ubuntu's consumer-facing engineering. "Ubuntu 13.10 is a full server-grade OS that offers a mobile experience and is lean enough to support mobile devices, kicking off a new era in mobile security and computing convergence."

Canonical is working with partners to bring Ubuntu smartphone devices to market in 2014. The desktop version of Ubuntu 13.10 reflects much of that progress, with scopes that organise home, apps, music, video content, lower device memory and graphics requirements and substantial improvements in battery and memory efficiency.

Ubuntu 13.10 includes a wide range of mobile core apps created by the Ubuntu developer community, including a browser, calendar, clock, weather, and calculator. The apps highlight distinctive elements of the Ubuntu user experience. This release also introduces the full SDK with a complete set of tools to develop apps for Ubuntu devices. It includes templates and extensions, theming, automatic orientation and easy to use UI tools for rapid application development. The SDK supports both native and HTML5 development, and responsive app design that makes it easy for developers to target phones, tablets and PCs with a single codebase.

"Thanks to our passionate community of early adopters and designers we've built a unique experience for end-users and for developers: one UI framework that scales across all the personal computing form factors" said Mark Shuttleworth, founder of Ubuntu and Canonical.

The Ubuntu Dash brings content straight to your desktop, searching more than 50 online sources through scopes. Ubuntu 13.10 introduces a Smart Scope on both desktop and phone which combines results from many different scopes automatically and learns individual user preferences so that search results improve for each user over time. In 13.10, the Dash includes many new search scopes including Wikipedia, Amazon, Google News and Flickr, and can be configured for privacy or specific search preferences.

MIR, the new open source graphics stack which supports higher frame-rates in games and mobile applications is enabled by default for smartphones and available as an option for desktops. Mir promises dramatic performance improvements for games, with better access to the latest underlying graphics capabilities of modern devices and a simplified driver model for widespread hardware support.

Availability:
Ubuntu 13.10 is available for download from the 17th October 2013 at ubuntu.com/download.
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11 Comments on Canonical Introduces Ubuntu 13.10

#1
devguy
I'm still running Ubuntu 12.04.2 as it's stable (and I've been lazy). But I'll probably move to this version as my final chapter with Ubuntu; I'm not on board with the whole Mir thing, and would, quite frankly, hope to see it falter in favor of Wayland.

BTW, AMD's latest Catalyst Beta works with up to Linux Kernel 3.12 RC, so it should work with this (3.11 kernel). I'll try it out later.
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#2
WaroDaBeast
Ditched Ubuntu ever since they stopped offering non-PAE kernels. It's not even a choice — my old laptop's CPU just doesn't have PAE.

Well, I can only thank them, 'cause thanks to them, I've tested other distros and finally found one that I really like.
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#3
Thefumigator
by: WaroDaBeast
Ditched Ubuntu ever since they stopped offering non-PAE kernels. It's not even a choice — my old laptop's CPU just doesn't have PAE.

Well, I can only thank them, 'cause thanks to them, I've tested other distros and finally found one that I really like.
Put ubuntu on a Core i7 and make it shine. I have it on an APU A6-3400M and I couldn't be happier. For old computers there is a particular non-pae linux that was great but I can't remember which, it was close to ubuntu though

time to take a look at distrowatch.com....
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#4
WaroDaBeast
by: Thefumigator
Put ubuntu on a Core i7 and make it shine. I have it on an APU A6-3400M and I couldn't be happier. For old computers there is a particular non-pae linux that was great but I can't remember which, it was close to ubuntu though

time to take a look at distrowatch.com....
I don't doubt Ubuntu works well on faster machines.

That said, while distro-hopping, I tried Manjaro and have grown really fond of it. It's a rolling release distro, so no need to wait 6 months — or go PPA-spelunking — to have the latest packages. Besides, it's got literally tons of packages (even stuff like exFat and linux-phc) in the repos, especially the AUR.

I installed Manjaro on another machine that sports an HD4670. Got no issues with catalyst-legacy either, while that was problematic with Ubuntu (now, granted, that AMD's fault for not updating their legacy driver, and not Canonical's).

As a bonus, the community is very helpful and welcoming, and the dev team listens to the users' input.

Well, there are other things I like about Manjaro, but I don't wanna keep on polluting this thread, which is about Ubuntu.
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#5
hardcore_gamer
by: Cristian_25H
the exact same Ubuntu OS runs on ARM phones and modern HP Moonshot ARM servers, and provides exactly the same capability as x86 platforms
Including application compatibility across platforms ?
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#6
Aquinus
Resident Wat-man
by: hardcore_gamer
Including application compatibility across platforms ?
I think they mean that all capabilities and software available to x86-64 Ubuntu is available for ARM Ubuntu.
Posted on Reply
#7
Galas
As a Debian user for as long as I can remember, and Ubuntu user from a couple of years ago, I don't get why they try so hard on this cross-platform compatibility. I think the right way todo it is normalize archs, not diversify them.
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#8
Thefumigator
by: WaroDaBeast


Well, there are other things I like about Manjaro, but I don't wanna keep on polluting this thread, which is about Ubuntu.
I'm really interested in new linux distros with good capabilities, we should open a thread

by: hardcore_gamer
Including application compatibility across platforms ?
if its compiled during install it shouldn't be too much of a problem
Posted on Reply
#9
WaroDaBeast
by: Thefumigator
I'm really interested in new linux distros with good capabilities, we should open a thread
I'd be more than willing to post in such a thread, so feel free to make one. :)
Posted on Reply
#10
Frick
Fishfaced Nincompoop
This is sort of a thread like that.
Posted on Reply
#11
Aquinus
Resident Wat-man
Upgraded my Gnome Ubuntu partition to 13.10. So far so good. If only I could convince the wife to give up Windows. :p
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