Saturday, October 19th 2013

ASUS Announces Adoption of NVIDIA G-SYNC Technology

ASUS is excited to announce that it will adopt NVIDIA G-SYNC technology into its next generation monitor lineup. NVIDIA G-SYNC, a significant innovation in display technology, provides an excellent gaming experience and stunning visual quality by synchronizing the monitor's refresh rate to the GPU's render rate. Images are displayed the moment they are rendered, which results in smoother gameplay and sharper images through the elimination of onscreen tearing, stuttering, and latency.

G-SYNC technology includes an NVIDIA G-SYNC module that requires integration into monitors, as well as hardware and software incorporated into its Kepler-based GPUs. It removes the need to use older technologies such as V-Sync, which can eliminate tearing but can increase latency and stuttering during gameplay. G-SYNC eliminates this trade-off leading to an uncompromised PC gaming experience.

ASUS, in a joint effort with NVIDIA, has been working over the past year to bring G-SYNC technology to market and will incorporate it into new monitors beginning in 2014. ASUS plans to release a G-SYNC-enhanced VG248QE gaming monitor in the first half of 2014 with pricing set at $399 USD in North America.

"ASUS strives to provide the best possible gaming experience by being at the forefront of technology and innovation. We are excited to be first to support and embrace NVIDIA's new G-SYSNC technology in upcoming ASUS gaming monitors. Gamers are certain to be impressed with its incredible step-up in smoothness and visual quality." said Vincent Chou, Associate Vice President of Display Business Unit ASUSTek.
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66 Comments on ASUS Announces Adoption of NVIDIA G-SYNC Technology

#1
Fairlady-z
Not up to date on this G-sync stuff is it open source, so people who own AMD can use it? My gut tells me its like PhysX :slap:
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#2
Xzibit
by: Fairlady-z
Not up to date on this G-sync stuff is it open source, so people who own AMD can use it? My gut tells me its like PhysX :slap:
Doesn't seam so according to Nvidia

Nvidia G-Sync Homepage
Q: Does NVIDIA G-SYNC work with other competitive products?

A: NVIDIA G-SYNC is only works with NVIDIA GPUs and G-SYNC enabled monitors.
Not all Kepler cards are supported either so make sure you have a supported GPU first.
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#3
Fairlady-z
by: Xzibit
Doesn't seam so according to Nvidia

Nvidia G-Sync Homepage



Not all Kepler cards are supported either so make sure you have a supported GPU first.
Thank you that was informative, so I guess I am out of luck with my 280x. Well at least some one benefits, and who knows AMD might have something in the piplines as well. Again thanks. :nutkick:
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#4
FrustratedGarrett
You don't need a "module" to achieve this form of synchronization between GPU output and monitor output. Sounds more like another cheap Nvidia attempt to hurt AMD, like the one they did with Origins PC..
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#5
Mistral
At that price the screen better be 120Hz and non-TN... :banghead:
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#6
sergionography
by: Mistral
At that price the screen better be 120Hz and non-TN... :banghead:
Even if it was it wont matter unless ur gpu runs at 120fps lol
so Yaa pay 400$ so 30fps can look smooth, or how about buy a 150$ dollar monitor and use the difference to buy a gpu that actualy is smooth over 60fps lol[/quote]
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#7
Hood
Works with nVidia GPUs, GTX 650 Ti Boost and better. I have a 660 Ti, so I'll be waiting for reviews to see if my next monitor upgrade should include it.
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#8
BiggieShady
Finally ... obvious solution is obvious
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#9
Rylan
by: FrustratedGarrett
You don't need a "module" to achieve this form of synchronization between GPU output and monitor output. Sounds more like another cheap Nvidia attempt to hurt AMD, like the one they did with Origins PC..
HDMI and DisplayPort protocols don't support this. So, how do you expect this to happen given current protocols?
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#10
Finners
by: Mistral
At that price the screen better be 120Hz and non-TN... :banghead:
144Hz but still only a TN-panel :(
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#11
Xzibit
by: Finners
144Hz but still only a TN-panel :(
Yup. Good luck convincing people with better panels to switch back to TN.

No multi-screens solutions unless your willing to put up with the angle distortions.
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#12
RejZoR
I find G-Sync rather useless. You don't replace monitors the same way as graphic cards and with such highly dependent configuration, buying an expensive monitor now can easily make it an useless configuration in 2 years time or less if you decide to go AMD path. And insisting with NVIDIA just because you have a G-Sync even if it will be crap just for the sake of G-Sync is also a crappy deal.

I wish someone would make a global upgrade replacement for old V-Sync so everyone can use it with no dependencies. It can't be that hard, it's just that no one seems to even bother...
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#13
The Von Matrices
by: Xzibit
Yup. Good luck convincing people with better panels to switch back to TN.

No multi-screens solutions unless your willing to put up with the angle distortions.
If you're buying an IPS panel for multiplayer FPS gaming, then you're missing something. IPS panels are great for 2D work and for enjoying artistic games, but if you want quick response time you should really be looking at TN. This is exactly what this ASUS monitor is targeted at, so criticizing it for not being IPS is missing the targeted product segment. ASUS makes IPS monitors for you too.

I also disagree with the multi-screen distortion issue. I use 3 TN panels in Surround and I have the side monitors slightly angled, which results in no color shifting. I switched from a single IPS monitor to 3 TN monitors, and I would never go back. The decreased response time and increased screen space sold me. I can get 3 good TN monitors for the same price as an excellent IPS monitor. I did my research before buying realizing that you need to be careful with TN panels, but if you buy a quality TN monitor and set it up correctly color shifting isn't a major issue since your viewing point is fixed (no one I know stands up and walks around when using a desktop computer).
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#15
RejZoR
People throw all TN's in the same "crap" bin just because they have TN matrix. In reality, it's nothing wrong with TN technology. I have a TN screen and have just replaced it with another biggger TN. I'm mostly a gamer but i also do photography and so far they served me just as well as any other. I have also tested several TN's at work and they worked fine as well, even at rather high view angles.

People tend to remember TN screens from their early days where image was pretty much gone at any angle other than 90° to the screen. Those days are long gone and most TN's hardly change any colors when viewed from an angle. And even if they do, differences are so small most won't even notice them unless if you're working professionally in which case you'll have IPS screen anyway...
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#16
The Von Matrices
by: RejZoR
People throw all TN's in the same "crap" bin just because they have TN matrix. In reality, it's nothing wrong with TN technology. I have a TN screen and have just replaced it with another biggger TN. I'm mostly a gamer but i also do photography and so far they served me just as well as any other. I have also tested several TN's at work and they worked fine as well, even at rather high view angles.

People tend to remember TN screens from their early days where image was pretty much gone at any angle other than 90° to the screen. Those days are long gone and most TN's hardly change any colors when viewed from an angle. And even if they do, differences are so small most won't even notice them unless if you're working professionally in which case you'll have IPS screen anyway...
One comment to add - there still are cheap, bad TN panels on the market, but they occupy the extreme low end of the monitor market (the <$60 black Fridays deals for example). If you're a careful shopper and read reviews, you can get a TN panel that rivals low end IPS panels in color accuracy for a fraction of the price.
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#17
SIGSEGV
NVIDIA G-SYNC is only works with NVIDIA GPUs and G-SYNC enabled monitors.
thank but no thank.
i won't buy such product which limit my option to buy or upgrade another product. However, it would be a good choice if you are with the green team forever :slap:
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#18
jihadjoe
by: SIGSEGV
thank but no thank.
i won't buy such product which limit my option to buy or upgrade another product. However, it would be a good choice if you are with the green team forever :slap:
The monitors should work just as well with any other card, you just won't get the G-SYNC feature running.
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#19
Slomo4shO
G-Sync at a $100-150 premium over the standard VG248QE? Charge a premium for the montior and then proceed to charge a premium for GPUs that support G-Sync :nutkick:

I suppose someone will actually think there is value in this product :banghead:
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#20
Xzibit
There is also NO guarantee it will work with all games as Nvidia has stated
Q: Does NVIDIA G-SYNC work for all games?

A: NVIDIA G-SYNC works with all games. However, we have found some games that do not behave well and for those games we recommend that users take advantage of our control panel’s ability to disable G-SYNC per game. Games that NVIDIA discovers that have trouble with G-SYNC will be disabled by default in our driver.
A list of compatible games would be helpful
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#21
Sagia86
Physx work on any cpu and gpu

by: Fairlady-z
Not up to date on this G-sync stuff is it open source, so people who own AMD can use it? My gut tells me its like PhysX :slap:
physx can run on pc with AMD gpu, only specific hardware accelerate physic effect are not run fast on CPU. Well, except if developer start using Physx SDK 3.2+, the performance even better that bullet physx
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#22
Deadlyraver
Man, Team Green is trying really hard to bench most of Team Red.

Hardware is never gonna be about performance anymore if this keeps up, probably will end up as a tech-advertising hub for us to neglect.

I've thought of enough crap with Nvidia's buying/selling habits on popular technologies whenever they hesitate on a new card from AMD. The same for AMD as well. On upper hands they are like a couple of stupid kids that bother each other without a clue of what to pay attention to.

They no longer pay attention to us anymore, they just expect us to accept things like this and jack up the bundling deals and price cuts when we don't.
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#23
NeoXF
Yay for walled garden experiences and fragmentation!

If it's any good, AMD will implement something similar.

But even then, what does that fix? If I get a better deal on the next-next generation of GPUs out of an nVidia card, I'm out of freaking luck, cause I don't have one of these "the way it's meant to be viewed" monitors, even tho I have pretty much have identical tech in my rig/monitor.

This is a fail/fail scenario for the end-user. Typical for nVidia.


Okay, here's another point, I'll seriously want to try something like this IF and only IF I hear about actual PRO gamers use it and find it helps with actual gaming, because as for immersion... stuff like the Occulus Rirft is the future, not this.
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#24
BorisDG
by: RejZoR
People throw all TN's in the same "crap" bin just because they have TN matrix. In reality, it's nothing wrong with TN technology. I have a TN screen and have just replaced it with another biggger TN. I'm mostly a gamer but i also do photography and so far they served me just as well as any other. I have also tested several TN's at work and they worked fine as well, even at rather high view angles.

People tend to remember TN screens from their early days where image was pretty much gone at any angle other than 90° to the screen. Those days are long gone and most TN's hardly change any colors when viewed from an angle. And even if they do, differences are so small most won't even notice them unless if you're working professionally in which case you'll have IPS screen anyway...
Yes, absolutly true. There are TN and TN like IPS and IPS. For example I compared my new laptop (Y510P Anti-Glare) TN screen colors/angles with my old Dell Inspiron 5110 (Glare) and also my ASUS EEE 1003HAG and believe me the difference is huge. The worst color reproduction and angles are for the Dell. Yes, super cheap TN display. The next was EEE PC - yes, nettop, small machine, but the screen is pretty decent. And of course the last one is Y510P. It has amazing screen for a TN (LG LP156WF1-TLB2 panel) - colors and angles. But of course they can't be compared to my amazing p-IPS screen in PA246Q witch is using WCG-CCFL all the way. So last years I can say that TN screens have lot of improvements in color accuracy and viewing angles.
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#25
RejZoR
I can see that the most between two of laptops that we have at home. ACER 5520G and my Compaq CQ57. Both have the same screen size and around 5-6 years apart.

ACER has really poor viewing angles where Compaq hardly changes any color under angles. I don't think LED vs CCFL has anything to do with that as it depends on the liquid crystal part and not the illumination alone...
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