Thursday, December 12th 2013

XFX Unveils Silent Radeon R7 200 Series Graphics Cards

XFX unveiled the first passive-cooled Radeon R7 200 series graphics cards, the full-height Radeon R7 250 Core Edition, and the half-height (low-profile) Radeon R7 240 Core Edition, pictured in that order. Both cards are based on a common half-height PCB design for the 28 nm "Oland" GPU, but due to higher thermal loads on the R7 250, its taller heatsink makes the card full-height. The R7 250 Core Edition offers AMD reference clock speeds of 1050 MHz core, and 4.60 GHz memory. It offers 1 GB of GDDR5 memory across a 128-bit wide memory interface. Its cooling solution is a heat-pipe fed aluminium fin stack. The R7 240 Core Edition, on the other hand, retains the same PCB, but makes do with a more compact cooling solution that makes the card low-profile ready. It features AMD reference clock speeds of 780 MHz core and 1.80 GHz memory, featuring 2 GB of DDR3 memory. The R7 250 Core Edition is priced around €92, while the R7 240 Core Edition goes for around €75.


Source: Hardware.info
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11 Comments on XFX Unveils Silent Radeon R7 200 Series Graphics Cards

#1
Dj-ElectriC
Cmon guys, step it up, an R7 260X will be wellcome
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#2
EpicShweetness
So are these for older system's looking for a replacement VGA because what they had burned out or something. Cause I think these VGA's perform close to or under what's in a APU. If that is the case then the relevance of these VGA's is quite small.
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#3
xpressoz
Hopeing SCS3 from PowerColor will come up with something better.
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#4
john_
A 7730 and a worst than a 7730 cards with passive cooling.
Nothing new to see here.....
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#5
LAN_deRf_HA
Looks better than past passive cards but again I don't get this crap about blocking the fins with a vanity plate. I'd be going for every scrap of cooling efficiency I could get on a passive card.
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#6
xvi
Seems like it would be more useful to put the fins oriented front to back to take advantage of any airflow it can get.

Certainly looks nice though.
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#7
Casecutter
by: Dj-ElectriC
Cmon guys, step it up, an R7 260X will be wellcome
Well, hard to consider that for such HTPC/media usage, as they get the 6-pin, and hard to find the Media/SSF cases and PSU that handles the thermal envelope (watt's and heat). Sure a R7 260X would be nice to include some gaming on the HTPC/Media box, but that rearranges the whole mix…

Nice that these are available, but with APU's and decent Intel graphic getting most media tasks suitablably done, such offerings have very exclusive consideration, use, and application anymore.
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#8
Dj-ElectriC
They have the technology. Hell, at 55NM you didn't need a 6PIN to get good graphics power. I am quite sure that HD7770-like power is able.
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#9
Casecutter
by: Dj-ElectriC
They have the technology. Hell, at 55NM you didn't need a 6PIN to get good graphics power. I am quite sure that HD7770-like power is able.
Today either of these deliver hugely more performance than a 4670 (55Nm) which didn't have a 6-pin. Look at it this way, today the R7 250 is probably something akin to the 4870 back then, and at that time it necessitated two 6-pins. We know AMD got accolades for efficiency back in the day, GCN 28Nm improved but wasn't as stunning.

Consider AMD had 900Mhz versions of the 7750 that got a 6-pin, while original 7750 at 800Mhz didn’t. It’s clearly evident the AMD 28Nm Cape Verde isn’t their "swam song of 28Nm", and especially when to a consider against 55Nm 150W TDP RV770 (or the GTX 650).

You could be right the Bonaire might with an under 1000Mhz clock, possibly "sneak-by" with only PCI-slot power; however would it still have (enough) oomph to best a 7770? Performance to watt might look like the 7750, while sheer performance @1080x might not be stout enough to give a decent experience on a large panel TV. The 7770 wasn't any true 1080x performer, I'm sure AMD has looked into it and it's still a marginal offering for price they need/want to sell it. Good 1080x gaming with just 75W isn't something either side could accomplish as of yet.
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#10
Dj-ElectriC
The R7 250 is actually pretty far from HD7770, HD4870. I don't think it comes close to HD 4850 or even HD 4770.
Heck, HD6670 could be faster than R7 250. The R7 250 is an HD7730 GDDR5, a card concidered much slower than HD 7750 witch is a card a bit faster than HD4850.

So again, they could handle RV770 LE without 6PIN. Theoretically, according to power consumption, even a 6PIN-less HD7850 is possible, even at about 800mhz core clock
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#11
Casecutter
by: Dj-ElectriC
The R7 250 is actually pretty far from HD7770, HD4870. I don't think it comes close to HD 4850 or even HD 4770.
Heck, HD6670 could be faster than R7 250. The R7 250 is an HD7730 GDDR5, a card concidered much slower than HD 7750 witch is a card a bit faster than HD4850.

So again, they could handle RV770 LE without 6PIN. Theoretically, according to power consumption, even a 6PIN-less HD7850 is possible, even at about 800mhz core clock
Your right I went back a looked at the spec's I though the R250 was slightly below a 7750, but you're correct it worse! The shader / pixel counts are more drastically cut than I thought, and their Thru-put for the added clock speed isn't enough to have parity.
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