Monday, December 16th 2013

Alkeron Rolls Out Class-E 211 Mini-ITX enclosure

Alkeron Hardware announced its new Class-E 211 Mini-ITX enclosure - a minimalist enclosure for low powered Mini-ITX boards intended primarily for multimedia use. The case features sleek design with brushed aluminum front panel. An internal power supply eliminates need for external "brick" reducing a wiring mess. The PSU delivers 65W of power, enough to power an Intel Atom or AMD APU based Mini-ITX board and a single 3.5" or 2.5" hard drive.

A built-in USB IR receiver works out of the box with majority remote controls and operating systems. The case was designed with Hi-Fi component form factor in mind and it fits nicely in Audio/Video rack. The case works well in fanless configuration delivering sufficient airflow through openings at the top and the rear - big plus for multimedia application. There an opening for optional 40mm exhaust fan at the real for extra cooling if required. The case was safety certified for US and Canada by UL labs. The case is currently available from manufacturer's online store as well as on Amazon and eBay. It will be arriving at retailers in early 2014 with MSRP US$179.
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7 Comments on Alkeron Rolls Out Class-E 211 Mini-ITX enclosure

#1
ironwolf
Woof, did I read that price correctly? Is this typical/average pricing for something like this?

Would have been nice (IMO) to have had a 2nd hard drive capability, maybe a SSD for boot and a big capacity spinner for storage.
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#2
newtekie1
Semi-Retired Folder
60W of power within 0°C-40°C ambient temperature range gradually degrading to 40W at 60°C
Eeewww...40w...

I'd like to see a shot with all the PSU wires in place to see how they do the 24-pin.
Posted on Reply
#3
hckngrtfakt
by: newtekie1
Eeewww...40w...

I'd like to see a shot with all the PSU wires in place to see how they do the 24-pin.
Most recent (if not all) Mini-ITX boards don't come with a 24-pin like bigger (older) boards do.

They all require a much smaller 4-pin connector while some others used to require a simple "molex" connector.

(then again,... i could be wrong)
Posted on Reply
#4
james888
by: hckngrtfakt
Most recent (if not all) Mini-ITX boards don't come with a 24-pin like bigger (older) boards do.

They all require a much smaller 4-pin connector while some others used to require a simple "molex" connector.

(then again,... i could be wrong)
My asus rog impact has a 24 pin.. Tottally different class of board though
Posted on Reply
#5
newtekie1
Semi-Retired Folder
by: hckngrtfakt
Most recent (if not all) Mini-ITX boards don't come with a 24-pin like bigger (older) boards do.

They all require a much smaller 4-pin connector while some others used to require a simple "molex" connector.

(then again,... i could be wrong)
The only mini-ITX boards I've seen that don't require a 24-pin use an external power brick which kind of makes this case with the internal power supply pointless.

Most mini-ITX boards still require a 24-pin, and the board they are using in the press photos is by MSI and definitely requires a 24-pin.
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#6
dtou
by: newtekie1
I'd like to see a shot with all the PSU wires in place to see how they do the 24-pin.
The board you see on the image is MSI E350IA-E45 which is 24-pin board and we used picoPSU-120 with it. It worked beautifuly but unfortunately you cannot see the picoPSU. Here is a better image for you:
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#7
dtou
by: hckngrtfakt
Most recent (if not all) Mini-ITX boards don't come with a 24-pin like bigger (older) boards do. They all require a much smaller 4-pin connector while some others used to require a simple "molex" connector.
(then again,... i could be wrong)
It is more efficient using VRMs on the main board with soldered CPUs then relying on an external PSU to provide required voltages. The power consumption of the CPU is know at the design time, so components can be sized precisely. I think that is the reason why there are more and more Intel Atom and AMD APU boards come equipped with 12V connector only. This is more typical for industrial boards then for retail ones.

Here is an example. We had to use picoPSU-120 with MSI E350IA-E45 board which is rated at 120W because picoPSU-90 couldn't handle it even though the board itself takes only 25-28W and PSU is rated at 65W.
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