Wednesday, January 22nd 2014

Intel Unveils New Education Tablet and Classmate PC

Intel Corporation unveiled innovative education-focused reference devices for the 21st century interactive learning environment today at Bett 2014. The new Intel Education Tablet and the Intel classmate PC are part of Intel Education Solutions, which includes devices, software, content, services and teacher professional development that work together to transform learning and teaching for student success.

Both the Intel Education Tablet and the classmate PC are student-friendly, rugged designs that can withstand dropping off a desk (from 70 cm) and provide water-resistance and dust-resistance to promote anytime, anywhere learning.

"Education leaders everywhere are passionate about driving student achievement and encouraging lifelong learning," said John Galvin, vice president of the Sales and Marketing Group at Intel and general manager of the World Ahead Program. "At Intel, we believe the right technology can be transformative. That's why we are focused on designing tools that bring learning to life, helping to make students more engaged. The result is a future where people have the skills they need for opportunity and growth."

The Intel Education Tablet runs on Android 4.2 and has kid-friendly features such as rubber bumpers on the sides making it easier for small hands to hold, a power button that resists accidental pushes and a stylus with a realistic pen-like grip. Powered by a dual-core Intel Atom processor Z2520, the 10-inch tablet has front- and rear-facing cameras and optional 3G support, and provides an average 12 hours of battery life to keep up with student learning all through the day.

The Intel Atom processor Z2520 clocks in at 1.2 GHz and supports Intel Hyper-Threading Technology, allowing four simultaneous application threads that further enhances the overall efficiency of the Atom cores. The integrated platform also includes an Intel Graphics Media Accelerator engine with a graphics core supporting rich 3-D visuals, life-like gaming and smooth, full 1080p hardware-accelerated video encode and decode at 30 frames-per-second, all useful in a 21st century learning environment.

The 10-inch Intel classmate PC is based on the Intel Celeron processor N2806 and runs Windows 8.1. A Windows 7 version and a Linux version based on Intel Celeron processor N2805 will be introduced later this year. The touch screen-optional device features a rotatable camera to promote content creation.

The HP Classmate Notebook PC is the first global commercial product based on the new classmate PC reference design and is expected to be available this month in the Americas, Europe, Middle East and Africa, and later this spring in the Asia-Pacific region.

"The HP Classmate Notebook helps deliver access to instructional tools, learning apps and education content to students and teachers around the world," said Gus Schmedlen, vice president, PPS Education, HP. "Combined with professional development and HP's national education technology planning resources, the HP Classmate can help drive meaningful learning, social and economic outcomes."

The new Intel Education Tablet and classmate PC are designed with features such as a snap-on magnification tool and a temperature sensor probe that plugs into the device's audio jack. These features allow students to view microscopic and macroscopic images and measure and analyze environmental data, bringing science to life and giving students the freedom to explore scientific concepts anywhere, not just in the science lab.

Intel Education Solutions for the Classroom
The new Intel Education Tablet and classmate PC are powerful learning tools that are part of the flexible, holistic Intel Education Solutions, including a range of devices from tablets to laptops to 2 in 1s, software, content, services and professional development for teachers to help engage students in learning and enhance student achievement. The Intel Education Software suite includes applications to engage students with tools that encourage inquiry across the curriculum and promote deeper engagement with content such as the Kno app (now part of Intel Education), which offers students and teachers access to a global digital content library of more than 225,000 educational titles.

Intel believes technology can empower educators, leaders and school technology professionals to better prepare students for a lifetime of success. Based on more than a decade of real-world collaboration, implementation and research, Intel Education Solutions are designed to help educators inspire students, to support schools in achieving educational excellence, and to enable better manageability by administrators. Intel's proven education solutions have helped more than 10 million teachers improve education for hundreds of millions of students in 100 countries.

Intel's full suite of education solutions are on display in Intel's stand at Bett 2014 (B358). The stand features a virtual classroom where real teachers will be teaching real class lessons based on Intel curricula.
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17 Comments on Intel Unveils New Education Tablet and Classmate PC

#1
Fourstaff
I can see students playing games on this instead of learning.
Posted on Reply
#2
ZetZet
You have this twisted idea that students don't play games now.
Posted on Reply
#3
RCoon
Forum Gypsy
by: Fourstaff
I can see students playing games on this instead of learning.
Not in my school, they're pretty well behaved.
These tablets are a waste of time and money however. They have the equivalent power of a desktop machine 6 years ago, all in a nice, small, fragile, and very droppable form factor. Excellent. I'll take 1200 now and the extra extra extended warranty. Oh and then I'll replace all of them in 12 months because they don't run more than 1 app at once, and have an exceedingly limited scope in an educational environment.
Posted on Reply
#4
Fourstaff
by: RCoon
Not in my school, they're pretty well behaved.
These tablets are a waste of time and money however. They have the equivalent power of a desktop machine 6 years ago, all in a nice, small, fragile, and very droppable form factor. Excellent. I'll take 1200 now and the extra extra extended warranty. Oh and then I'll replace all of them in 12 months because they don't run more than 1 app at once, and have an exceedingly limited scope in an educational environment.
Your school is pretty well behaved. Nevertheless, I still haven't found a teaching method better than chalk and talk. Might be biased of course, since I studied maths.
Posted on Reply
#5
RCoon
Forum Gypsy
by: Fourstaff
Your school is pretty well behaved. Nevertheless, I still haven't found a teaching method better than chalk and talk. Might be biased of course, since I studied maths.
Technology does not belong it good old fashioned academic subjects like english and maths. It's always been more of a hinderance, but school heads and governors don't listen, they're only interested in their teaching "image" as opposed to actual teaching practice.
Posted on Reply
#6
Mussels
Moderprator
lol, our old PC's at school were used for duke nukem 3D and quake 1.


students will always find a way to have fun with whatever they're given - and it teaches them more than the classes ever will - teach them how to use office? oh, how special.

teach them to bypass basic security and user control and install apps, drivers and mods to get games running on a PC not meant to run games? THAT sets them up for a career in IT ;)
Posted on Reply
#7
arterius2
seriously? kids that don't play games? what kind of messed up society is that? leave me out of it.
Posted on Reply
#8
W1zzard
by: Fourstaff
I can see students playing games on this instead of learning.
I can see students doing lines off this instead of learning.

Back when I was in school, I haxxed the PCs and installed Doom :)
Posted on Reply
#9
RCoon
Forum Gypsy
by: W1zzard
I can see students doing lines off this instead of learning.

Back when I was in school, I haxxed the PCs and installed Doom :)
I'm too young to share in your nostalgia, all I managed to do was get the administrator password for the servers, get told off by the police for accessing private and confidential information "on my way" to installing counterstrike 1.6. I then used their print server as a file storage server for all my important cracks and trainers.

If only Doom was the offender, I might've been in less trouble.

(Oh, they then employed me there for 3 years)
Posted on Reply
#10
W1zzard
by: RCoon
I'm too young to share in your nostalgia, all I managed to do was get the administrator password for the servers, get told off by the police for accessing private and confidential information "on my way" to installing counterstrike 1.6. I then used their print server as a file storage server for all my important cracks and trainers.

If only Doom was the offender, I might've been in less trouble.
I still got called to the principal's office. There were no passwords on the system and it had no real security, so I didn't do anything illegal. Basically I dragged CMD.EXE into MSWord and double clicked it to get a DOS prompt.
Posted on Reply
#11
RCoon
Forum Gypsy
by: W1zzard
Basically I dragged CMD.EXE into MSWord and double clicked it to get a DOS prompt.
Now that is dastardly. I bet they thought you were the god damned NSA of school.
Posted on Reply
#12
Mussels
Moderprator
i used a similar trick to get virus infested copies of windows vista working a while back - used IE to open explorer.exe and bypass the virus, to let me install antivirus :P
Posted on Reply
#13
W1zzard
by: RCoon
Now that is dastardly. I bet they thought you were the god damned NSA of school.
ah I remember now, I used the "Insert OLE object" function, because you couldn't open explorer or other programs that would let you browse the file system. Obviously the system still needs a file open dialog, and it would let you just type filenames, so I used that
Posted on Reply
#14
jivenjune
by: Fourstaff
Your school is pretty well behaved. Nevertheless, I still haven't found a teaching method better than chalk and talk. Might be biased of course, since I studied maths.
I don't think this is entirely correct. Overhead projectors are being replaced by standard projectors, chalk is replaced by whiteout and whiteboards, and sometimes in a lecture hall, it's nearly impossible to take notes without some kind of device hooked up to a keyboard.
Posted on Reply
#15
Steevo
There is a weakness in the trash bin too.


On a OP relevant note that "PC" looks like one of my kids leapfrog "laptops". Nothing I would ever willingly touch or use.
Posted on Reply
#16
TheGuruStud
Good news everyone! Since this doesn't have a need for budget restriction like OLPC (that intel helped ruin), we all get to pay out of pocket for more intel crap through taxes. Yay!
Posted on Reply
#17
micropage7
by: Fourstaff
I can see students playing games on this instead of learning.
or browsing and checking their FB when their teacher explaining
Posted on Reply
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