Friday, March 28th 2014

ENERMAX Unveils the TwisterPressure 120 mm Fan

ENERMAX is proud to bring the latest fan innovation for the PC cooling market, the TwisterPressure. This new fan uses a high-pressure blade design which enhances the cooling performance and is the ideal choice for CPU coolers and any applications with dense grills. The TwisterPressure fan features APS PWM, a Twister Bearing design, and is one of the few world leading fans that can run at 85 degrees Celsius consistently.

High Pressure Blades Design
High Pressure Blade design is a precision engineering of the blade angle and shape calculation. The blades centralize dispersed airflow to the center of the fan and create extremely high air pressure, high airflow while maintaining outstanding quietness.

APS (Adjustable Peak Speed) PWM
Patented APS control allows users to adjust their preferred fan peak speed by shifting the speed control at the fan hub. The range of the speed would be regulated automatically by PWM (Pulse-width modulation), with options of 500~1200/1500/1800. Therefore, the fan will run on a pre-set RPM range of customized performance between cooling performance and silent operation.

Twister Bearing
Patented Twister Bearing with magnetic bearing technology allows friction-free and self-lubricating rotation on our unique patented structure design. Such bearing design permits the fan to operate at extreme silence and for prolonged operation with industry leading MTBF of up to 160,000 hours. Twister bearing also has a quick fan detachment design for cleaning and maintenance.
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24 Comments on ENERMAX Unveils the TwisterPressure 120 mm Fan

#1
RCoon
Gaming Moderator
by: Cristian_25H
operate at extremely silence
Grammar error fix'd!
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#2
Jack1n
Looks great on paper but i doubt its what it can actually do at those noise levels.
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#3
mr2009
looks really good on paper though but can it really achieve that? i want to see review on that fan...
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#4
Hood
23 dBA is almost inaudible, and there's no way any fan will flow 80 CFM without a lot more noise. They're probably testing it in open air, from 10 feet away. There are no set standards for noise testing, so any method can be used, and unscrupulous companies will make bogus claims. Unless they invented passive noise cancelling, those figures are impossible.
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#5
RCoon
Gaming Moderator
by: Hood
23 dBA is almost inaudible, and there's no way any fan will flow 80 CFM without a lot more noise. They're probably testing it in open air, from 10 feet away. There are no set standards for noise testing, so any method can be used, and unscrupulous companies will make bogus claims. Unless they invented passive noise cancelling, those figures are impossible.
You mean like BenQ's claim that their monitor has 12,000,000 dynamic contrast ratio? :laugh: twelve, freaking, million! :laugh:
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#6
LAN_deRf_HA
This is interesting to me because out of the zillion fans I've tried Enermax fans are the only ones I've found that have consistently silent bearings, either by QC or the nature of the design, plus long life and work in any orientation, and on top of that decent prices. So if they've come up with a more effective blade design I'm all for it.
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#7
ensabrenoir
wow that would be cool....love enermax..... mainly for the bling factor though. Nice to get some performance to go along with it
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#8
ironwolf
So the quick fan detachment idea isn't lifting any skirts around here?
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#9
Jorge
Fan performance depends a lot on the application. You can take two CPU heatsinks and get very different fan performance even though the heatsinks look very similar. Because we can't easily see actual airflow in practice it's difficult to know exactly what is happening and how to improve a situation or understand when a issue exist. Higher static pressure helps in many cases so if these fans are quiet and can force the air thru restricted areas, they might be very good.
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#10
RCoon
Gaming Moderator
by: Jorge
You can take two CPU heatsinks and get very different fan performance
That's because the heatsinks are designed differently. Has nothing to do with the fans performance miraculously changing on a whim. The heatsink design changes the fan's effectiveness (see: FPI).
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#11
Hood
by: ironwolf
So the quick fan detachment idea isn't lifting any skirts around here?
If you check user reviews on fans with detachable blades, it's almost always noted that the fan will get noisy or slower after removing the blades, usually the dreaded clatter at all RPMs. One guy broke the blades because they were so hard to detach. So detach them if you want, but don't be surprised if they become unbearably noisy. The return shipping is almost more than the fan is worth, unless you're sending back a lot of them. If I bought them it wouldn't be for that reason, and I'd clean them without disassembly.
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#12
LAN_deRf_HA
by: Hood
If you check user reviews on fans with detachable blades, it's almost always noted that the fan will get noisy or slower after removing the blades, usually the dreaded clatter at all RPMs. One guy broke the blades because they were so hard to detach. So detach them if you want, but don't be surprised if they become unbearably noisy. The return shipping is almost more than the fan is worth, unless you're sending back a lot of them. If I bought them it wouldn't be for that reason, and I'd clean them without disassembly.
I had one of these that came ever so slightly popped out. It ran, but ran better once I pushed down on it hard and snapped it in fully. Wonder if those people just didn't get it in all the way, because it does take a lot of force to take them off and on.
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#13
natr0n
whats the real cfm of these is the question.
79.46
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#14
Sempron Guy
I'm a fan of detachable blades and I owned several Enermax TBH Silence and Clusters. Removed the blades a couple of times and never did I encounter an issue of the fan getting noisy afterwards.
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#15
RejZoR
Looks good. Though i somehow hesitate buying anything other than Noiseblocker. Their stuff is really good. Though i wouldn't mind detachable blades, becase that would make it really easy to clean (i had to remove dust filters for my Antec H2O 920 radiator).
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#16
1c3d0g
I like that they upped the MTBF to 160.000 hours. More reliability is always a great thing in my book.
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#17
Svarog
ENERMAX TP - Ultra Silent Mode - 500 RPM - 40,45 m3/h - 12 dB

Noctua S12A - Low Noise Adapter - 600 RPM - 57,5 m3/h - 6,7 dB
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#18
LAN_deRf_HA
by: Svarog
ENERMAX TP - Ultra Silent Mode - 500 RPM - 40,45 m3/h - 12 dB Noctua S12A - Low Noise Adapter - 600 RPM - 57,5 m3/h - 6,7 dB
Unless it's an industrial manufacturer like nidec, delta, or san ace, then spec numbers are made up. You're not doing yourself any favors using them for comparison.
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#19
Svarog
by: LAN_deRf_HA
Unless it's an industrial manufacturer like nidec, delta, or san ace, then spec numbers are made up. You're not doing yourself any favors using them for comparison.
Noise and Performance numbers of Noctua are hardly made up, and that's a fact.
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#20
badtaylorx
by: LAN_deRf_HA
I had one of these that came ever so slightly popped out. It ran, but ran better once I pushed down on it hard and snapped it in fully. Wonder if those people just didn't get it in all the way, because it does take a lot of force to take them off and on.
i hate it when it "pops out"....lulz
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#21
Bansaku
by: Sempron Guy
I'm a fan of detachable blades and I owned several Enermax TBH Silence and Clusters. Removed the blades a couple of times and never did I encounter an issue of the fan getting noisy afterwards.
I love(d) Enermax for years, and I will say that they are as quiet and as powerful as they claim, however 75% of all removable blades by them I have owned did get a lot more noisy afterwards. :(
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#22
Aquinus
Resident Wat-man
by: Svarog
Noise and Performance numbers of Noctua are hardly made up, and that's a fact.
Source? Have you tested their specs to make sure that they're correct? Most "specs" are guesstimates because you can't determine how much back pressure the fan is going to experience when it starts moving air and that will easily change how loud and how much air it moves at any given RPM. Those specs are probably with the fan not attached to anything if they are "real".
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#23
micropage7
by: Aquinus
Source? Have you tested their specs to make sure that they're correct? Most "specs" are guesstimates because you can't determine how much back pressure the fan is going to experience when it starts moving air and that will easily change how loud and how much air it moves at any given RPM. Those specs are probably with the fan not attached to anything if they are "real".
personally im ok with that noise, as long as it works well
but theres a time then its too much
noctua and enermax bring good fans for market
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#24
Aquinus
Resident Wat-man
by: micropage7
personally im ok with that noise, as long as it works well
but theres a time then its too much
noctua and enermax bring good fans for market
It's not about the noise, it's about what the specs represent, how they were obtained and what conditions need to be met for them to be true. That's what I'm getting at.

Also, I used to be the same way, hence why I have some DELTA fans on my case and on my server for exhaust and when they're going full speed, they're very loud. Which is why I don't run them at full speed, but if I wasn't using headphones there comes a point when the background noise starts drowning out speakers, so you have to turn the speakers up and suddenly your wife is pissed at you because she can hear what you're doing as well as the TV show she is watching in the other room. :p ...but I digress.
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