Monday, April 7th 2014

SK Hynix Developed the World's First Highest Density 128 GB DDR4 Module

SK Hynix Inc. announced that it has developed the world's first highest density of 128 GB (Gigabytes) module based on 8 Gb(Gigabit) DDR4 using its advanced 20 nm class technology.

This module has double density compared to existing 64 GB by taking advantage of TSV(Through Silicon Via) technology. This new product works at 2133 Mbps and with a 64-bit I/O it processes up to 17 GB of data per second. It also runs at ultra low-voltage of 1.2V which does at lower voltage than 1.35V of existing DDR3.

SK Hynix is expected to continuously maintain its technology leadership in the server DRAM market by providing the samples of the world's first 128 GB and 64 GB modules built on 8 Gb DDR4. The Company plans to start volume mass production of those from the first half of next year.

"The development of the world's first 128 GB DDR4 module has its significance in opening ultrahigh density server market" said Senior Vice President Sung Joo Hong, the Head of DRAM Development. "The Company will further strengthen its competitiveness in premium DRAM sphere with the development of high density, ultrahigh speed and low power consuming products" he added.

According to Gartner, server DRAM market will grow 37% in annual average until 2018 following expansion of mobile environment. Plus, the new interface DDR4 is expected to be certified by customers in this year and is anticipated to be commercialized regularly from 2015. Also, it is expected to be the main standard in the industry from 2016.
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16 Comments on SK Hynix Developed the World's First Highest Density 128 GB DDR4 Module

#1
Hilux SSRG
I don't think you're allowed to touch the bottom of the ram like that !!

Cool its 1.2v but can I increase voltage to 1.5v to oc the speed from 2133mhz to 3000+mhz?
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#2
theJesus
:laugh: That single stick is more than double the memory my server has with twelve sticks. Granted, I'm sure it also costs at least 4x what I paid for 12x4GB DDR3; probably more.
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#3
Hood
At the dawn of "The DDR4 Era", aren't we the lucky ones...they're going to space out the adoption of desktop DDR4 sticks to ensure the maximum number of unnecessary upgrades along the way, or HEDT sales, just to get on the DDR4 bandwagon. It won't be relevant until 2016 when it becomes required to run mainstream platforms. Until then I'll just keep using whatever DDR3 speed is in the sweet spot at the moment.
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#4
Assimilator
That stick has 19 chips on its PCB. Assuming that 16 are actual memory ICs and there is an identical number on the reverse (32 total), that means 4GB/chip which is 32Gb/chip, so each chip is presumably made up of 4x 8Gb ICs.

Hell, 4 gigabytes per RAM chip... I just upgraded from 4GB RAM sticks not too long ago.
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#5
bogami
RAM disc, growing capacity, DDR4 is nothing new! Nice but not cheap. With the application of existing DDR3 RAM disc ,no matter REEVODRIVE3 SSD (on moy PC), extremely speed up PC applications, therefore, we can ask ourselves SSD or RAM disc! RAM disc is the winner of at speed at SSD the capacity .124 GB of RAM will almost equal sizes available! The price is currently very high. Approximately € 10 for 1 Gb RAM or mor !Necessary will be to combine the the selected hardware.
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#6
Jorge
Nice for servers but nothing else.
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#7
Aquinus
Resident Wat-man
by: Jorge
Nice for servers but nothing else.
I don't agree with you often, but for this I will. The higher capacity DIMMs are damn sexy for my line of work. The more memory you can store in the box the better. Not too long ago at work we loaded 3 servers full of memory. two with 96GB (dual triple channel servers, 2 cpu) and one with 64GB (single quad-channel server, 2 cpu). With the way technology is moving it won't be long where we could move all of our current servers into a single dual-CPU box with some beefy storage. Memory won't be an issue when that day comes.

As a consumer, the low voltage bit is nice. Might make for nice high density low power mobile DRAM modules. If you can get the same performance and double the capacity of two DRAM ICs versus one bigger one, that saves space and power.

All in all, it sounds like a win-win for the memory industry as long as your not interested incredibly performance gains. :P

All in all, I wouldn't mind have four DIMMs totaling 512GB of RAM. :p
With that much memory, I could completely rethinking how I use it because of the abundance of it... but I'm dreaming. Reality dictates we be patient. :rolleyes:
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#8
Steevo
I agree with all but the low voltage, consumers don't care about that in desktops, they want blinding performance. Much like fast cars.
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#9
Supercrit
Ramdisk with battery backup? SSDs probably can't touch it, so does the price.
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#10
behinddawindow
by: Steevo
I agree with all but the low voltage, consumers don't care about that in desktops, they want blinding performance. Much like fast cars.
Well consumers (end-users) don't care but people who design these chips and put them in phones/computers do. Simple EE stuff:


Since frequency is increasing, you need to lower the voltage to lower the overall power consumption. It's possible that problems can occur if you were to clock at 2400 - 2500MHz. This may cause interference with Wifi, Bluetooth, etc.
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#12
Fierce Guppy
Beautiful... OK, assuming I could afford two of those, I'd utilize 220GB for a RAMDisk to buffer uncompressed QHD gameplay. I guess DDR4 motherboards will be able to address a much larger amount of RAM. Maybe 512GB or even greater.
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#13
Aquinus
Resident Wat-man
by: Steevo
I agree with all but the low voltage, consumers don't care about that in desktops, they want blinding performance. Much like fast cars.
Not all customers are looking for performance hardware. The fast car analogy is bad because not all consumers want fast cars. There are a lot of mobile users though, so being able to use this to say double the amount of memory in a tablet without more ICs or power consumption is a win for consumers without being performance oriented.

Not all technology improvements are about performance.
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#14
freaksavior
To infinity ... and beyond!
by: Fierce Guppy
Beautiful... OK, assuming I could afford two of those, I'd utilize 220GB for a RAMDisk to buffer uncompressed QHD gameplay. I guess DDR4 motherboards will be able to address a much larger amount of RAM. Maybe 512GB or even greater.
Probably won't happen, consumers just do not need this much memory. I imagine the 128Gb is a flagship stick, we're more likely to see 128Gb as the maxed out ram.

edit:

There is a board that already supports 128Gb of ram. http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813130681

Maybe 256Gb then on a high end consumer board, but the lower end probably 64 and 128.

Edit again:

Newegg (and google,duckduckgo) cannot find a kit with 8x16Gb anyway, or even 1x16Gb.
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#15
Fierce Guppy
by: freaksavior
Probably won't happen, consumers just do not need this much memory. I imagine the 128Gb is a flagship stick, we're more likely to see 128Gb as the maxed out ram.

edit:

There is a board that already supports 128Gb of ram. http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813130681

Maybe 256Gb then on a high end consumer board, but the lower end probably 64 and 128.

Edit again:

Newegg (and google,duckduckgo) cannot find a kit with 8x16Gb anyway, or even 1x16Gb.
128GB appears to be the largest amount supported at the ultra enthusiast end of the market at the moment. I can find 3 and they're all MSI boards. There's Xeon based motherboards that can support up to 512GB like the Asus Z9PE-D16, Z9PE-D16/12 and a number of Intel motherboards but they're all dual CPU and are marketed towards corporates rather than the end consumer, so they don't count. Things change rapidly. My Rampage II Extreme was extreme back in 2009 and it supports up to 12GB of DDR3. A workmate bought a budget PC middle of last year which had 16GB of 1600MHz RAM installed. It's annoying crap like that that makes me want to upgrade again. lol.
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#16
Aquinus
Resident Wat-man
We are talking DDR4 here, so nothing would support this. Just an FYI.
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