Wednesday, April 16th 2014

Corning Announces Availability of USB 3.Optical Cables

Corning Incorporated today announced the availability of its USB 3.Optical Cables by Corning, capable of sending up to 5 gigabits per second of data at distances up to 30 meters. Compatible with most USB 3.0 and USB 2.0 devices, USB 3.Optical Cables by Corning quickly and easily extend data transmission beyond the 3-meter limitation of comparable copper cable.

Optical Cables by Corning were introduced in January 2013 and are now available for sale through select consumer electronic retail channels.

Enabled by Corning ClearCurve VSDN optical fiber, the USB 3.Optical Cables by Corning are up to 50 percent thinner and up to 80 percent lighter than comparable copper cables, qualities that enable convenient transport. With a "zero-bend" radius, they can withstand bending, squeezing, and tangling without damage or loss of function, making them ideal for routing through the harsh environment of a crowded workspace.

"With longer, thinner, and lighter cables, USB 3.Optical Cables by Corning give users the freedom to max out data connection speeds for a more enjoyable creative workflow," said Bernhard Deutsch, vice president, product line management, Optical Connectivity Solutions for Corning Optical Communications. "Imagine having your computer at your workstation and the whir of back-up hard drives, printers, and other noisy peripherals in an entirely different room - and still benefiting from unbelievable transmission speeds."

USB 3.Optical Cables by Corning are ideal for connecting today's USB 3.0 and USB 2.0 devices, including digital cameras and camcorders; storage drives; digital signage and point-of-sale systems at retail locations; zero-client computing; smart boards in educational institutions; and remote consoles in healthcare and industrial automation settings.

"Our cables aren't just for the creative community," Deutsch said. "There are a host of commercial applications that can benefit from the increased length, strength and flexibility of USB 3.Optical Cables by Corning."

"For example, restaurants can connect order-entry stations to USB-equipped printers located in both the bar and kitchen areas. The system then splits out the orders, printing food tickets in the kitchen and drink orders at the bar, resulting in faster service and happier customers."

USB 3.Optical Cables by Corning currently come in lengths of 10 meters with "A-to-receptacle-A" connectors for maximum flexibility to connect devices with different USB connector form factors, such as B or Micro B with short adapters. They are now available online through Accu-Tech and Amazon, starting at $129. They will also be available in cable lengths of 15 and 30 meters later this year.
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7 Comments on Corning Announces Availability of USB 3.Optical Cables

#1
Easy Rhino
Linux Advocate
I get that optical cables are a huge advancement in this area. But harddrives cannot read/write information at 5Gb/s
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#2
ironwolf
Woof, I nearly choked when I saw the price. :cry:
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#3
3dExtreme
I wouldn't pay $5 for the damn cable...
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#4
WithoutWeakness
by: Easy Rhino
I get that optical cables are a huge advancement in this area. But harddrives cannot read/write information at 5Gb/s
This isn't just for hard drives. This is a 30 meter (~100 foot) USB extension cable that uses an optical cable rather than a copper one to allow for full-speed USB 3.0 connections over absurdly long distances. This is in response to Thunderbolt supporting optical cables over similar distances. Thunderbolt still supports higher throughput but USB is so ubiquitous, inexpensive, and is fast enough for most purposes that it makes more sense for many people to get this cable and use it with existing hardware than it does to move to optical Thunderbolt for long-distance runs..

Of course you could always grab a USB-over-Cat5/6 kit and a long ethernet cable for cheap and see if that gets the job done for 1/4 of the price but you'll be limited to USB 2.0 speeds, which is still fast enough for something like the printer example in the article.: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B003L14ZTC/?tag=tec06d-20
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#5
Prima.Vera
by: Easy Rhino
I get that optical cables are a huge advancement in this area. But harddrives cannot read/write information at 5Gb/s
SSDs are already capped at that speed.
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#6
Easy Rhino
Linux Advocate
by: Prima.Vera
SSDs are already capped at that speed.
what do you mean capped at that speed?
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#7
Prima.Vera
by: Easy Rhino
what do you mean capped at that speed?
No, I meant 5Gbps is already saturated by the latest SSDs. Plus, considering the overhead of the USB bus....
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