Monday, May 5th 2014

AMD Announces Ambidextrous Computing Roadmap

AMD today announced a roadmap of near- and mid-term computing solutions that harness the best characteristics of both the x86 and ARM ecosystems, called "ambidextrous computing." The cornerstone of this roadmap is the announcement of AMD's 64-bit ARM architecture license for the development of custom high-performance cores for high-growth markets. Today's announcement also provides a forward-looking glimpse into AMD's development plans to deliver truly unmatched ambidextrous computing and graphics performance using a shared, flexible infrastructure to enable its customers to blaze new paths of innovation for the embedded, server and client markets as well as semi-custom solutions.

"Before today, AMD was the only company in the world to deliver high performance and low-power x86 with leadership graphics. AMD now takes a bold step forward and has become the only company that can provide high-performance 64-bit ARM and x86 CPU cores paired with world-class graphics," said Rory Read, AMD president and CEO. "Our innovative ambidextrous design capability, combined with our portfolio of IP and expertise with high-performance SoCs, means that AMD is set to deliver ambidextrous solutions that enable our customers to change the world in more efficient and powerful ways."

The market for ARM- and x86-based processors is expected to grow to more than $85 billion by 2017(1). AMD is uniquely positioned as the only company delivering differentiated solutions capable of addressing the breadth of this market. This is the first time a major processor provider has created the IP path to allow others to leverage innovation across both ARM and x86 ecosystems.

AMD's ambidextrous computing roadmap includes:
  • "Project SkyBridge" - This design framework, available starting in 2015, will feature a new family of 20 nanometer APUs and SoCs that are expected to be the world's first pin-compatible ARM and x86 processors. The 64-bit ARM variant of "Project SkyBridge" will be based on the ARM Cortex-A57 core and is AMD's first Heterogeneous System Architecture ("HSA") platform for Android; the x86 variant will feature next-generation "Puma+" CPU cores. The "Project SkyBridge" family will feature full SoC integration, AMD Graphics Core Next technology, HSA, and AMD Secure Technology via a dedicated Platform Security Processor (PSP).
  • "K12" - A new high-performance, low-power ARM-based core that takes deep advantage of AMD's ARM architectural license, extensive 64-bit design expertise, and a core development team led by Chief CPU Architect Jim Keller. The first products based on "K12" are planned for introduction in 2016.
"At ARM we are dedicated to working with partners who revolutionize and transform experiences everywhere from sensors to servers," said Simon Segars, CEO at ARM. "AMD's market reach and proven experience in leading industry transitions to 64-bit computing in client and server environments, combined with ARM's low power expertise and server base system architecture (SBSA) standard, will deliver new capabilities and drive innovation across multiple high growth markets."

AMD today also publicly demonstrated for the first time its 64-bit ARM-based AMD Opteron A-Series processor, codenamed "Seattle," running a Linux environment derived from the Fedora Project. The Fedora Project is a Red Hat-sponsored, community-driven Linux distribution, providing a familiar, enterprise class operating environment to developers and IT administrators worldwide. This Fedora Project-based Linux environment enables companies to transition to ARM-based servers without the need to integrate entirely new tools and software platforms to their IT environments. This demonstration represents a significant step forward in expanding the footprint of ultra-efficient 64-bit ARM processors within the data center.
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18 Comments on AMD Announces Ambidextrous Computing Roadmap

#1
Vinska
I wonder what does that mountain in the second image mean...
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#2
erocker
by: Vinska
I wonder what does that mountain in the second image mean...
Mountain?
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#3
flyin15sec
Most likely "K12" --> K12 of Saltoro Moutains, near Kashmir.

Edit: makes sense now why they called the transitional CPU Project Skybridge.
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#4
Vinska
by: erocker
Mountain?
In the second image, look at the top right corner of the red area.
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#5
Suka
Hoping to see 20nm FX cpus also in 2015.
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#6
Hilux SSRG
This is what tablets/laptops really need. Imagine this on a Surface or lightweight Samsung Series9.
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#7
Hilux SSRG
Amd has abandoned competing with Intel's i7's and HEDT platforms for a while now.


They are branching out with this ambidextrous design for better or worse.

I for one think its a good gamble to swing around Intel and grab low-mid x86 marketshare while moving into 64bit Arm architecture for new markets.

But all this is still too early to tell.
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#8
ensabrenoir
I'm liking Amd ambidextrous way of thinking as of late. And ya gotta admit their marketing department is comming up with some cool nick names/ buzz words...that actually work......
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#9
dwade
Another bust from AMD.
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#10
xenocide
by: Suka
Hoping to see 20nm FX cpus also in 2015.
AMD has pretty much abandoned the FX line. They can't compete with Intel so they are trying to circumvent them by going all in with APU's and HSA, popping out products like Mantle to sidestep weaker CPU's.
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#11
leeb2013
by: Vinska
I wonder what does that mountain in the second image mean...
it looks more like a fire with smoke on top to me. It's probably in relation to heat and power consumption.
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#12
Aquinus
Resident Wat-man
by: Vinska
In the second image, look at the top right corner of the red area.
Many of us read from left to right, that would be the third image, not the second unless you're counting from the right to the left.

I think you mean this image in the red next to AMD "K12" ARM Core:
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#13
Jizzler
by: Aquinus
Many of us read from left to right, that would be the third image, not the second unless you're counting from the right to the left.

I think you mean this image in the red next to AMD "K12" ARM Core:
That first image didn't exist yesterday (bad link or was recently added).

Hmmm... mashed potatoes with gravy?
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#14
MT Alex
by: Jizzler
That first image didn't exist yesterday (bad link or was recently added).

Hmmm... mashed potatoes with gravy?
Richard Dreyfuss: "This means something!"
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#15
Hilux SSRG
by: xenocea
I don't think AMD has completely given up the higher end market yet. Here's an interesting read.

AMD Confirms Development of High-Performance x86 Core With Completely New Architecture

AMD’s top chip architect Jim Keller has confirmed during the AMD’s Core Innovation press conference that they are developing a new high-performance x86 core which will replace the current high-performance x86 cores that include Steamroller, Piledriver and Bulldozer.

With Jim Keller onboard, AMD is finally developing a new core architecture that’s built from scratch and means that AMD won’t make the same mistakes they made with Bulldozer. The architecture is still far from being ready and we are looking at a launch scenario of atleast 2016-2017 so that’s still a long time to go from where we are currently. It is likely that if AMD succeeds in developing the new cores in time, then we won’t see AMD’s fourth generation modular x86 Excavator cores in 2015 since AMD will skip it for the new core introduction otherwise AMD’s 2015 line of APUs will stick with Excavator which will be the last modular AMD core before it hops onboard the SMT design.

Performance numbers are a mystery and so is the codename but atleast we got a conformation from AMD that they haven’t abandoned the high-performance desktop market at all. AMD has several APUs planned for Opteron and desktop lines with new cores but one can now imagine much faster next generation desktop processors and APUs which will fuse AMD’s next high-performance x86 core architecture.


http://wccftech.com/amd-confirms-development-of-high-performance-x86-core-with-completely-new-architecture/#ixzz30wTaguIV
Finally AMD is starting from scratch on a new design as every forum poster has stated they should have done a year or two ago.
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#16
Vinska
by: Aquinus
Many of us read from left to right, that would be the third image, not the second unless you're counting from the right to the left.
Just as @Jizzler said – the [currently] first image was not there yesterday, so at the time the image I was referring to was the second from any end.
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#17
Aquinus
Resident Wat-man
by: Vinska
Just as @Jizzler said – the [currently] first image was not there yesterday, so at the time the image I was referring to was the second from any end.
So really it's @Cristian_25H 's fault. :p

On topic, I'm curious that the mountain means too. You know, maybe it means that it's the first of AMD's own ARM based CPU, because the first few are using the ARM Cortex-A57 cores where the "K10" CPU will be AMD's own custom ARM core, but some clarification on that would be pretty awesome.

Thanks for the clarification by the way. I was unaware the post started with just 3 images. I missed @Jizzler 's post.
Edit: That's because I posted before him and haven't checked the thread since. Thanks nonetheless. :)
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#18
james888
When you guys mentioned a mountain I thought there might be a correlation between seattle/Mt. Rainier but looking at it I really don't know.
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