Monday, May 12th 2014

G-Sync is Dead. VESA Adds Adaptive-Sync to DisplayPort Standard

The Video Electronics Standards Association (VESA) today announced the addition of 'Adaptive-Sync' to its popular DisplayPort 1.2a video interface standard. This technology delivers several important capabilities to computer users: Adaptive-Sync provides smoother, tear-free images for gaming and judder-free video playback. It also significantly reduces power consumption for static desktop content and low frame rate video.

Computer monitors normally refresh their displays at a fixed frame rate. In gaming applications, a computer's CPU or GPU output frame rate will vary according to the rendering complexity of the image. If a display's refresh rate and a computer's render rate are not synchronized, visual artifacts-tearing or stuttering-can be seen by the user. DisplayPort Adaptive-Sync enables the display to dynamically match a GPU's rendering rate, on a frame-by-frame basis, to produce a smoother, low latency, gaming experience. In applications where the display content is static-such as surfing the web, reading email, or viewing a slide presentation-DisplayPort Adaptive-Sync allows the display refresh rate to be reduced seamlessly, lowering system power and extending battery life.

During the playback of lower frame rate video content, Adaptive-Sync allows the source to optimize transport of the video format leveraging OS and DisplayPort interfaces. In addition to providing smoother video playback, the lower frame rate enabled by Adaptive-Sync also reduces power demand, extending battery life.

"DisplayPort Adaptive-Sync enables a new approach in display refresh technology," said Syed Athar Hussain, Display Domain Architect, AMD and VESA Board Vice Chairman. "Instead of updating a monitor at a constant rate, Adaptive-Sync enables technologies that match the display update rate to the user's content, enabling power efficient transport over the display link and a fluid, low-latency visual experience."

Adaptive-Sync is a proven and widely adopted technology. The technology has been a standard component of VESA's embedded DisplayPort (eDP) specification since its initial rollout in 2009. As a result, Adaptive-Sync technology is already incorporated into many of the building block components for displays that rely on eDP for internal video signaling. Newly introduced to the DisplayPort 1.2a specification for external displays, this technology is now formally known as DisplayPort Adaptive-Sync.

"VESA is constantly evaluating new methods and technologies that add value to both the end user and our OEM member companies. Adaptive-Sync delivers clearly visible advantages to the user for gaming and live video, and contributes to the development of sleeker mobile system designs by reducing battery power requirements," said Bill Lempesis, VESA Executive Director. "VESA has developed a test specification to certify Adaptive-Sync compliance. Systems that pass Adaptive-Sync compliance testing will be allowed to feature the official Adaptive-Sync logo on their packaging, informing consumers which DisplayPort-certified displays and video sources offer Adaptive-Sync."

Implementation of DisplayPort Adaptive-Sync is offered to VESA members without any license fee.
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54 Comments on G-Sync is Dead. VESA Adds Adaptive-Sync to DisplayPort Standard

#1
Hitman_Actual
Now it's all on the manufacturers to produce their monitors with the capability.
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#2
renz496
so when we can see real game demo?
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#3
Casecutter
Good we don't proprietary... Nice to see some folks pushing back and making companies stop this we “own that”… BS.

Let’s hope Mantle if does nothing more than get MS off it's "dead gaming azzes"... They're lost on the Xbox market, and I see Mantle made them jump on Dx12 improve quicker. I don’t want Mantle so much other than than just to move MS. If it's supposely open (not exclusive), and moves performance forward it’s done its job!
Posted on Reply
#4
Svarog
by: Hitman_Actual
Now it's all on the manufacturers to produce their monitors with the capability.
Which sucks...

Why can't they make something that's between the two ends of the cable so it can be used on all DisplayPort Monitors.
Posted on Reply
#5
erocker
by: Svarog
Which sucks...

Why can't they make something that's between the two ends of the cable so it can be used on all DisplayPort Monitors.
If there's a demand, someone will eventually sell it.
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#6
GhostRyder
It could be cool so long as monitors with the capabilities come out to work on the specification. I have been waiting to see this implemented similar to the time AMD's FreeSync was announced. It will only come across as a cool platform is the monitors supporting it come along as well. I wonder if any of the coming 4k monitors (Specifically the asus) will have this built in.
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#7
Hitman_Actual
by: erocker
If there's a demand, someone will eventually sell it.
Thats the thing, Nvidia did the foot work already and created their own logic board/Gsync so the manufacturers didn't have to do the work.

it will be interesting to see what happens down the road.
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#8
erocker
by: Hitman_Actual
Thats the thing, Nvidia did the foot work already and created their own logic board/Gsync so the manufacturers didn't have to do the work.

it will be interesting to see what happens down the road.
From what I've read the implementations are different. I just hope the results are similar.
Posted on Reply
#9
Hitman_Actual
by: erocker
From what I've read the implementations are different. I just hope the results are similar.
yah when AMD countered with "freesync" after the G-sync unveiling Nvidia responded saying that there is a lot more to G-sync then what VR standard driven freesync is doing.
We'll see what happens.
Posted on Reply
#10
GhostRyder
by: Hitman_Actual
yah when AMD countered with "freesync" after the G-sync unveiling Nvidia responded saying that there is a lot more to G-sync then what VR standard driven freesync is doing.
We'll see what happens.
But of course they are going to say that, I mean you wouldn't want your new device to sound likes its been out done by something that is counted as "Free". But in reality the G-Sync module is probably going to be better (even if it turns out to be slightly). Its just going to come down to how close freesync is to G-Sync as to whether its going to be worth it to buy the G-Sync monitor.

Will be interesting to see the monitor list of support for the proprietary one as well as freesync.
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#11
Hitman_Actual
by: Hitman_Actual
yah when AMD countered with "freesync" after the G-sync unveiling Nvidia responded saying that there is a lot more to G-sync then what VR standard driven freesync is doing.
by: GhostRyder
But of course they are going to say that, I mean you wouldn't want your new device to sound likes its been out done by something that is counted as "Free". But in reality the G-Sync module is probably going to be better (even if it turns out to be slightly). Its just going to come down to how close freesync is to G-Sync as to whether its going to be worth it to buy the G-Sync monitor.

Will be interesting to see the monitor list of support.
Yah well see, It's still boils down to the manufacturers to make monitors capable of VR. The standard doesn't mean anything until we see that.
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#12
Fierce Guppy
Oh, happy days! Thanks to AMD and nVidia trying to undercut each other we will soon have adaptive-vsync in monitors and mantle like improvements in DX12. Times are good.
Posted on Reply
#13
GhostRyder
by: Hitman_Actual
Yah well see, It's still boils down to the manufacturers to make monitors capable of VR. The standard doesn't mean anything until we see that.
Yea which is the primary problem, the reality is that the tools are all there so now the manufacturers need to bite the bullet.
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#14
Hitman_Actual
We shall see.. there are a lot of steps involved to actually get adoption.. In the meantime G-Sync works today
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#15
Fluffmeister
This seems to be more of a means to an end, say hello to AMD's G-Sync alternative called "Project FreeSync":

by: TechReport

Q: How are DisplayPort™ Adaptive-Sync and Project FreeSync different?
A: DisplayPort™ Adaptive-Sync is an ingredient DisplayPort™ feature that enables real-time adjustment of monitor refresh rates required by technologies like Project FreeSync. Project FreeSync is a unique AMD hardware/software solution that utilizes DisplayPort™ Adaptive-Sync protocols to enable user-facing benefits: smooth, tearing-free and low-latency gameplay and video.
Source: http://techreport.com/news/26451/adaptive-sync-added-to-displayport-spec
Posted on Reply
#16
Xzibit
by: Hitman_Actual
yah when AMD countered with "freesync" after the G-sync unveiling Nvidia responded saying that there is a lot more to G-sync then what VR standard driven freesync is doing.
We'll see what happens.
You referring to this ?

January 8, 2014 - The TechReport - Nvidia responds to AMD's "free sync" demo

by: Tom Petersen interview
However
Right now our module is LVDS
May 12, 2014 - VESA - VESA® Adds ‘Adaptive-Sync’ to Popular DisplayPort™ Video Standard

Board of Directors
Craig Wiley, Chairman, Parade Technologies
Syed Athar Hussain, Vice Chairman, AMD
Brian Fetz, Secretary/Treasurer, Agilent Technologies
Simon Ellis, Intel
Alan Kobayashi, MegaChips
Gourgen Oganessyan, Hirose Electric USA
Pablo Ortega, NVIDIA

by: VESA

VESA is constantly evaluating new methods and technologies that add value to both the end user and our OEM member companies. Adaptive-Sync delivers clearly visible advantages to the user for gaming and live video, and contributes to the development of sleeker mobile system designs by reducing battery power requirements, ”said Bill Lempesis, VESA Executive Director. “VESA has developed a test specification to certify Adaptive-Sync compliance. Systems that pass Adaptive-Sync compliance testing will be allowed to feature the official Adaptive-Sync logo on their packaging, informing consumers which DisplayPort-certified displays and video sources offer Adaptive-Sync.”
Implementation of DisplayPort Adaptive-Sync is offered to VESA members without any license fee.
Display Port Adaptive-Sync doesn't look like its limited to Full Screen 3D mode like G-Sync. Now that is officially standard it wont be limited to single monitor use like G-Sync.
Posted on Reply
#17
CoD511
by: Xzibit

Display Port Adaptive-Sync doesn't look like its limited to Full Screen 3D mode like G-Sync. Now that is officially standard it wont be limited to single monitor use like G-Sync.
Could you clarify what you mean by full-screen 3D mode, if you could? A bit bamboozled by your meaning :P If you meant limited to 144Hz capable monitors, then that one would be a no, it isn't and can be used on any monitor. There was a demo with G-sync on a ASUS 4K, 60hz monitor at CES by Nvidia to demonstrate as such.
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#18
Xzibit
by: CoD511
Could you clarify what you mean by full-screen 3D mode, if you could? A bit bamboozled by your meaning :p If you meant limited to 144Hz capable monitors, then that one would be a no, it isn't and can be used on any monitor. There was a demo with G-sync on a ASUS 4K, 60hz monitor at CES by Nvidia to demonstrate as such.
G-Sync only works in fullscreen 3D mode. Doesn't work in 2D or window 3D mode.
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#19
erocker
by: Hitman_Actual
We shall see.. there are a lot of steps involved to actually get adoption.. In the meantime G-Sync works today
It does, and I gotta say, it's pretty damn awesome.. You just can't seem to buy the kits anywhere.. and they only work with Nvidia cards. This technology is something everyone should experience. So, again I hope it's done right. :)
Posted on Reply
#20
CoD511
by: erocker
It does, and I gotta say, it's pretty damn awesome.. You just can't seem to buy the kits anywhere.. and they only work with Nvidia cards. This technology is something everyone should experience. So, again I hope it's done right. :)
The flood of monitors should hopefully come with G-sync very soon, the first one I know of is being released in the UK in two weeks. I can see most other 1080p 144hz monitors like that AOC one being released being anything but right behind it. The ROG Swift a little longer perhaps but sometime in Q2...
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#21
pr0n Inspector
by: Xzibit
G-Sync only works in fullscreen 3D mode. Doesn't work in 2D or window 3D mode.
But the entire desktop has been a 3D surface since Vista...
Posted on Reply
#22
Xzibit
by: pr0n Inspector
But the entire desktop has been a 3D surface since Vista...
Time to petition Nvidia then.

Guru3D - NVIDIA G-Sync Explored and Explained

by: Guru3D
Okay, we slowly get to the point where we will install the monitor and drivers. Right now there are some requirements for G-Sync:
  • Windows 7/8.1 Desktop PC.
  • GeForce GPU – GTX 650 Ti Boost or Higher with DisplayPort Connector (we used a GTX 760 for G-SYNC testing.)
  • DisplayPort 1.2 cable (our press sample is DP1.2 compatible.)
  • Full-screen mode applications (games must be run in full-screen mode to use G-SYNC.)
  • Quality gaming mouse (6400dpi, 1000Hz polling) and/or a quality game controller.
You'll notice that I highlighted a line there, yes games and thus application will need to be run in full screen mode. So windowed G-Sync as it stands will not work. This has to do with the NV control panel being profile based, and these profiles do not work in a windowed mode. For our tests I'll be using a rather normal GeForce GTX 760.
G-Sync also disable the audio pass-through in DisplayPort.
Posted on Reply
#23
erocker
by: CoD511
The flood of monitors should hopefully come with G-sync very soon, the first one I know of is being released in the UK in two weeks. I can see most other 1080p 144hz monitors like that AOC one being released being anything but right behind it. The ROG Swift a little longer perhaps but sometime in Q2...
As much as I'd like to get one, I just can't stop using my 1440p OC'd monitor. I'd kind of rather wait until the end of the year when I plan to replace my current system. :)
Posted on Reply
#24
The Von Matrices
by: Xzibit
G-Sync only works in fullscreen 3D mode. Doesn't work in 2D or window 3D mode.
If you're running things in a window, then the usefulness of adaptive sync is questionable. The only reason you would run a program in windowed mode would be if you cared about the content of more than one window; however, each window will be rendering/refreshing at different rates. If you software synchronizes to one window with a variable refresh rate, then every other window's cadence looks even worse than with a fixed refresh rate. For example if you're trying to display a video and a 3D rendering, then focusing upon the 3D rendering will cause the video to become a stuttering mess. The highest fixed refresh rate that a monitor can display will be the best compromise for a multiple window environment.
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#25
Recus
Serious question: how do you feel when paying for free product?
There are few AMD cards, which already support this technology, but unfortunately you won’t find a single monitor which is DisplayPort 1.2a compatible.
So how will users get FreeSync working on their systems?

To use Project FreeSync, users will require: a monitor compatible with DisplayPort Adaptive-Sync, a compatible AMD Radeon GPU with a DisplayPort connection, and a compatible AMD Catalyst graphics driver. AMD will release a compatible graphics driver to coincide with the introduction of the first DisplayPort Adaptive-Sync monitors.
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