Friday, May 16th 2014

Pioneer Develops 256 GB Blu-ray Disc

Pioneer is developing a new media based on the Blu-ray standard, which offers 256 GB of unformatted capacity. The capacity is achieved by recording data in a staggering eight layers, double that of Blu-ray XL, which relies on four layers to achieve 100 GB of capacity. Pioneer claims it has even made strides towards an even newer Blu-ray media that could, in the near future, offer 512 GB of unformatted capacity. The 256 GB Blu-ray disc could prove useful for making large data backups, or even imaging your SSD. Pioneer isn't the only player in the high-capacity optical disc game. Sony and Panasonic collaborated to announce ArchivalDisc, an optical disc that offers 300 GB of capacity, except that it doesn't stick to the Blu-ray standard, and you'll need specially made disc-drives to use them. Since Pioneer's disc builds on the existing Blu-ray standard, it will be cheaper for optical drive makers to adopt it.


Source: Pioneer
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22 Comments on Pioneer Develops 256 GB Blu-ray Disc

#1
xBruce88x
awesome! bring on the 4k pr0nz, err i mean re-re-re-release of starwars collections! (b/c we all know no one actually buys pr0n anymore)

would be good news for console games if they start using tons of 4k pre-rendered cut scenes.
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#2
Batou1986
I'm going to assume read speeds on this are very low making it only suited to archival purposes
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#3
xBruce88x
read speeds shouldn't be too horrible, writing to it on the other hand is a different story...
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#4
Prima.Vera
by: xBruce88x

would be good news for console games if they start using tons of 4k pre-rendered cut scenes.
That's utopia. Even the newest consoles right now are using (extremely) high compressed 720p videos. IF you are lucky.
Games that are using 1080p videos are almost nonexistent.
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#5
WaroDaBeast
by: Prima.Vera
That's utopia. Even the newest consoles right now are using (extremely) high compressed 720p videos. IF you are lucky.
Games that are using 1080p videos are almost nonexistent.
Are you referring to last gen consoles? Because 1080p is more common on current gen consoles... at least, that's true for the PS4.
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#6
AsRock
TPU addict
Risky to buy SONY stuff as they are getting out of most of the markets and going more like IBMPanasonic.
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#7
Hilux SSRG
by: AsRock
Risky to buy SONY stuff as they are getting out of most of the markets and going more like IBMPanasonic.
True they are getting out of computer hardware sales, but they still have the PS3 + PS4, along with royalties from Bluray. I wouldn't say risky yet.

I've read that the larger capacity DVDs and Blurays have a propensity to degrade at a faster rate.
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#8
TheGuruStud
A 256GB SSD/flash drive is cheaper than this disc LOL

Optical mediums are dead unless a major breakthrough is attained in holographic.
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#9
cheesy999
by: Prima.Vera
That's utopia. Even the newest consoles right now are using (extremely) high compressed 720p videos. IF you are lucky.
Games that are using 1080p videos are almost nonexistent.
the quantity of ps3 games that had uncompressed 1080p cutscenes for the sole reason that the disk just had lots of space left over, means i doubt that
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#10
cyneater
I wonder how much the blanks will cost.

A 25Gb blu ray is around $2.5...
50Gb DL blu ray is from $3..
Blu Ray XL on ebay $25

So a 256GB blu ray will be over $100 for 256gb .....
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#11
The Von Matrices
by: TheGuruStud
A 256GB SSD/flash drive is cheaper than this disc LOL

Optical mediums are dead unless a major breakthrough is attained in holographic.
For consumers, sure. But for companies making millions of discs they are still an order of magnitude cheaper than flash memory.

by: cyneater
I wonder how much the blanks will cost.

A 25Gb blu ray is around $2.5...
50Gb DL blu ray is from $3..
Blu Ray XL on ebay $25

So a 256GB blu ray will be over $100 for 256gb .....
Where are you buying your BD-Rs? As long as you buy in spindles you can get 25GB BD-Rs for less than $1 per disc.
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#12
cyneater
by: The Von Matrices
For consumers, sure. But for companies making millions of discs they are still an order of magnitude cheaper than flash memory.



Where are you buying your BD-Rs? As long as you buy in spindles you can get 25GB BD-Rs for less than $1 per disc.
Maybe in the USA or Europe.
Down under we get reamed when it comes to prices.
And I'm talking decent bands not princo or other dodgy brands.
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#13
buggalugs
by: cyneater
Maybe in the USA or Europe.
Down under we get reamed when it comes to prices.
And I'm talking decent bands not princo or other dodgy brands.
Hey, I'm an Aussie too, you can get blu ray discs for around $1 each here in a spindle pack.

Don't know which state you're in but in Melbourne you can get 25 Bluray discs for $27 from MSY. They are Ritek brand. They have some other brands as cheap as 50 cents each in a spindle.
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#14
marsey99
all that porn on 1 disk!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!11!!!!!!
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#15
Svarog
All we need now is 2TB SSDs for €200,-

(maybe in about 50 years)
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#16
TheGuruStud
by: The Von Matrices
For consumers, sure. But for companies making millions of discs they are still an order of magnitude cheaper than flash memory.
Who do you think would use these discs besides a few enthusiasts when movies become larger? The price will always be high. They're worthless for corporate.
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#17
The Von Matrices
by: TheGuruStud
Who do you think would use these discs besides a few enthusiasts when movies become larger? The price will always be high. They're worthless for corporate.
I don't see your point. If some company needs to distribute the same 256GB of data to many users, then optical discs make vastly more financial sense than flash memory.
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#18
kn00tcn
by: WaroDaBeast
Are you referring to last gen consoles? Because 1080p is more common on current gen consoles... at least, that's true for the PS4.
he said compressed videos, not the in game rendered resolution

speaking of which, when i was trying out UDK, i made a 1080p intro movie thinking it will be fine on my decent desktop.... nope, stuttery mess, yet the 720p intro movie was perfectly fine

with the current hardware & software advancements, it might be time for game engines to stop using bink video & start using h264/x264 or webm

it's always a balancing act to use cutscenes, the quality directly relates to the total filesize & that affects every user that is downloading (whether it's a console or pc)
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#19
WaroDaBeast
by: kn00tcn
he said compressed videos, not the in game rendered resolution

speaking of which, when i was trying out UDK, i made a 1080p intro movie thinking it will be fine on my decent desktop.... nope, stuttery mess, yet the 720p intro movie was perfectly fine

with the current hardware & software advancements, it might be time for game engines to stop using bink video & start using h264/x264 or webm
So, the problem lies within the use of bink video? Pfft, what a joke...
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#20
Thrackan
Opticals have been dead since the post-DVD era. They are just too slow.
For archiving purposes tapes are also continuously growing larger, and tapes are better in so many ways.
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#21
Prima.Vera
by: Thrackan
Opticals have been dead since the post-DVD era. They are just too slow.
For archiving purposes tapes are also continuously growing larger, and tapes are better in so many ways.
Tell that to the millions of movies/games BluRays and DVDs rented/sold each year. :))))
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#22
Thrackan
by: Prima.Vera
Tell that to the millions of movies/games BluRays and DVDs rented/sold each year. :))))
Dear millions of movies and games, you are dead.
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