Tuesday, May 20th 2014

Graphics Add-in Board Market Down in Q1, NVIDIA Holds Market Share

Jon Peddie Research (JPR), the industry's research and consulting firm for graphics and multimedia, announced estimated graphics add-in-board (AIB) shipments and suppliers' market share for 2014 1Q.

JPR's AIB Report tracks computer add-in graphics boards, which carry discrete graphics chips. AIBs are used in desktop PCs, workstations, servers, and other devices such as scientific instruments. They are sold directly to customers as aftermarket products, or are factory installed. In all cases, AIBs represent the higher end of the graphics industry using discrete chips and private high-speed memory, as compared to the integrated GPUs in CPUs that share slower system memory.

The news was disappointing, but seasonally understandable, quarter-to-quarter, the market dropped 6.7 % (compared to the desktop PC market, which dropped 9%).

On a year-to-year basis we found that total AIB shipments during the quarter fell 0.8%, which is more than desktop PCs which declined of 1.1%.

GPUs are traditionally a leading indicator of the market because a GPU goes into every system before it is shipped; most of the PC vendors are guiding down to flat for the next quarter.

The overall PC desktop market increased quarter-to-quarter including double-attach-the adding of a second (or third) AIB to a system with integrated processor graphics - and to a lesser extent, dual AIBs in performance desktop machines using either AMD's Crossfire or Nvidia's SLI technology.

The attach rate of AIBs to desktop PCs has declined from a high of 63% in Q1 2008 to 45% in 2014 1Q, up from 43.8% last quarter.

The quarter in general
JPR found that AIB shipments during 2014 1Q behaved according to past years with regard to seasonality, but the decrease was more than the 10-year average. AIB shipments decreased 6.7.% from the last quarter (the 10-year average is -3.2%).
  • Total AIB shipments decreased this quarter to 14 million units.
  • AMD's quarter-to-quarter total desktop AIB unit shipments decreased 6.6%.
  • Nvidia's quarter-to-quarter unit shipments decreased 6.6%.
  • Nvidia continues to hold a dominant market share position at 65%.
  • Figures for the other suppliers were flat to declining.
The change from quarter to quarter was slightly less than last year.
Add your own comment

8 Comments on Graphics Add-in Board Market Down in Q1, NVIDIA Holds Market Share

#1
15th Warlock
S3 and Matrox? Are they still around? Man just had a deja vu about playing on my old 512KB S3 trio 64 :p
Posted on Reply
#2
cadaveca
My name is Dave
by: 15th Warlock
S3 and Matrox? Are they still around? Man just had a deja vu about playing on my old 512KB S3 trio 64 :p
I was just going to say...

Who just made a giant screen? or 6? 1% of total sales?
Posted on Reply
#3
DaJMasta
New consoles, slowing new product generations, reduced desktop sales (they're the only ones that can use add in boards, unless it's including laptop dedicated boards which have to be a tiny fraction of the market)... it's not surprising.
Posted on Reply
#4
TRWOV
by: 15th Warlock
S3 and Matrox? Are they still around? Man just had a deja vu about playing on my old 512KB S3 trio 64 :p
VIA still sells embedded CPUs with S3 graphics (basically the same ones from the P4 era). Matrox chipsets are used in some server boards (all G34 boards have Matrox graphics I think) and their medical line is well regarded.
Posted on Reply
#5
sweet
nVidia's professional market is still a steady stronghold for their consumer-milking campaign, sad :(
Posted on Reply
#6
GhostRyder
Wow, interesting to see that embedded is still like this. I thought for sure the market was dieing down more and more especially on the server side.
Posted on Reply
#7
HumanSmoke
by: sweet
nVidia's professional market is still a steady stronghold for their consumer-milking campaign, sad :(
It's actually the same for both vendors. A R9 290X is ~$520-550 (w/ reference cooler), while the W9100 is around six times the price for what basically amounts to 12GB more vRAM, since software isn't adding appreciably to the feature set as it would be with a Quadro or Tesla.
Posted on Reply
#8
R-T-B
by: 15th Warlock
S3 and Matrox? Are they still around? Man just had a deja vu about playing on my old 512KB S3 trio 64 :p
They are... they even had their own SLI/Crossfire style implementation at one point...

Though it looks like they are finally dead (lol, 0% market share FTW!)
Posted on Reply