Monday, July 21st 2014

Intel Outs Six New Haswell-based Entry Level Processors

Intel rolled out six new entry-level socket LGA1150 dual-core processors, based on the "Haswell" micro-architecture. These include four-each under the Pentium and Core i3 brands. Among the Pentium parts are the G3250 (3.20 GHz clocks, 1.10 GHz iGPU, 3 MB L3, 53W TDP, 2c/2t); Pentium G3250T (2.80 GHz clocks, 1.10 GHz iGPU, 3 MB L3, 35W TDP, 2c/2t); Pentium G3450T (2.90 GHz clocks, 1.10 GHz iGPU, 3 MB L3, 35W TDP, 2c/2t); and Pentium G3460 (3.50 GHz clocks, 1.10 GHz iGPU, 3 MB L3, 53W TDP, 2c/2t).

The HyperThreading-enabled Core i3 parts include the Core i3-4160 (3.60 GHz clocks, 1.15 GHz iGPU, 3 MB L3, 54W TDP, 2c/4t); Core i3-4160T (3.10 GHz clocks, 1.15 GHz iGPU, 3 MB L3, 35W TDP, 2c/4t); Core i3-4360T (3.20 GHz clocks, 1.15 GHz iGPU, 4 MB L3, 34W TDP, 2c/4t); and the Core i3-4370 (3.80 GHz clocks, 1.15 GHz iGPU, 4 MB L3, 54W TDP, 2c/4t), which is the fastest dual-core CPU money can buy.

Source: CPU World
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16 Comments on Intel Outs Six New Haswell-based Entry Level Processors

#1
qu4k3r
I'm still waiting for an unlocked i3
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#2
RCoon
Forum Gypsy
by: qu4k3r
I'm still waiting for an unlocked i3
Intel probably think it will hurt their i5 sales to gamers. Everybody buys quad cores, and if there's an unlocked i3 with HT which essentially runs like a quad core, for half the price, they'll start losing sales on the higher margin quad core kit.
Posted on Reply
#3
timta2
by: RCoon
Intel probably think it will hurt their i5 sales to gamers. Everybody buys quad cores, and if there's an unlocked i3 with HT which essentially runs like a quad core, for half the price, they'll start losing sales on the higher margin quad core kit.
That might be the funniest thing I've read today. :laugh:
Posted on Reply
#4
Popocatepetl
by: RCoon
Intel probably think it will hurt their i5 sales to gamers. Everybody buys quad cores, and if there's an unlocked i3 with HT which essentially runs like a quad core, for half the price, they'll start losing sales on the higher margin quad core kit.
But i3 don't cost half of what i5 chips cost - Intel could very well make the unlocked i3 "K" the most expensive i3 out there (as is the case with the fastest i5 and i7 K chips), on par with locked and slower i5. This would give users a choice between more real cores and higher single=-threaded performance at same price point.

It is my belief that this strategy would actually IMPROVE Intel's bottom line as i3 K chip would be cheaper to manufacture than a locked i5 (either by using smaller two-core die or by salvaging partially defective quad cores that couldn't be sold as i5/i7), meaning that for every locked i5 sale they lose to an unlocked i3 at the same price point, they'd be making MORE profit on that sale.
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#5
RCoon
Forum Gypsy
by: Popocatepetl
It is my belief that this strategy would actually IMPROVE Intel's bottom line as i3 K chip would be cheaper to manufacture than a locked i5 (either by using smaller two-core die or by salvaging partially defective quad cores that couldn't be sold as i5/i7), meaning that for every locked i5 sale they lose to an unlocked i3 at the same price point, they'd be making MORE profit on that sale.
Well they still haven't done it since the dawn of the i3, so there must be a valid monetary-related reason not to.
Posted on Reply
#6
john_
Intel Outs Six New Haswell-based Entry Level Processors

8 not 6
Posted on Reply
#7
BiggieShady
by: RCoon
Well they still haven't done it since the dawn of the i3, so there must be a valid monetary-related reason not to.
There is a reason and the reason is physics. Since i3/i5/i7 have all same die size, they are all i7 cpus with certain parts disabled. Now, chips that needed to have most parts disabled due to them being unstable at stock speeds, those chips become i3 cpus.
It's physically highly unlikely that same piece of silicon that's unstable at stock frequencies in some parts, to have remaining functional parts that overclock well.
This is how physical reason becomes monetary: essentially to create that product from current yield they would have to sell some of their non-K i5 cpus as a i3-K.
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#8
bogami
Where the unsuccessful cut chip go? , it is visible here! Seems that the production of a new series hasvell is not so successful and there is now a need to sell the crap . For my terms too expensive. not have to cost you 5$ for the entire product. However, here with the garbage would like to earn big profits !
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#9
buildzoid
by: BiggieShady
There is a reason and the reason is physics. Since i3/i5/i7 have all same die size, they are all i7 cpus with certain parts disabled. Now, chips that needed to have most parts disabled due to them being unstable at stock speeds, those chips become i3 cpus.
It's physically highly unlikely that same piece of silicon that's unstable at stock frequencies in some parts, to have remaining functional parts that overclock well.
This is how physical reason becomes monetary: essentially to create that product from current yield they would have to sell some of their non-K i5 cpus as a i3-K.
Look they just have to slap a K on the end of it and ulock the multiplier it's not like intel is selling CPUs with a minimum OC promise. Some i7 4770Ks only do 4Ghz so I don't see why intel would have a problem selling an i3 that only OCes to 3.8Ghz. Also just because 2 of 4 cores are defective/crappy doesn't mean that the remaining ones are also.
Posted on Reply
#10
medo
G3250 = $64 3.2Ghz
G3460 = $86 3.5Ghz

22$ for 300 Mhz ??? and in the entry level cpu category, i see why intel is keen on firing there marketing and sales employees every now and then.
Posted on Reply
#11
HalfAHertz
by: BiggieShady
There is a reason and the reason is physics. Since i3/i5/i7 have all same die size, they are all i7 cpus with certain parts disabled. Now, chips that needed to have most parts disabled due to them being unstable at stock speeds, those chips become i3 cpus.
It's physically highly unlikely that same piece of silicon that's unstable at stock frequencies in some parts, to have remaining functional parts that overclock well.
This is how physical reason becomes monetary: essentially to create that product from current yield they would have to sell some of their non-K i5 cpus as a i3-K.
They have two versions of haswell - a quad one used for i5s and i7s and a dual core one used for pentiums and i3s. Then each of those has a few more variants for mobile where the only difference is in the GPU part. This info is from AT.
Posted on Reply
#12
michael
35W........? ohh Wow.:rockout: It it is almost close to Synology NAS 214 which takes only 16W to run.
So now running Desktop PC for hours will be convinient without huge bills. ;) :toast:
Posted on Reply
#13
P4-630
A few years ago intel always mentioned L2 cache, nowadays they talk about L3 cache, a large amount of L2 cache is much better then L3 is it not?
Posted on Reply
#14
TheinsanegamerN
by: P4-630
A few years ago intel always mentioned L2 cache, nowadays they talk about L3 cache, a large amount of L2 cache is much better then L3 is it not?
A large amount of L2 would be more expensive than a large amount of l3, since l3 has higher timings and as such, is easier to manufacture. Performance wise, l3 is much more beneficial for multi threaded performance than l2. Given that more software is going multi thread, the l3 makes more sense.
Posted on Reply
#15
TechAssimilate Editor 2
It also seems like Intel has removed WiDi functionality from all these Core i3 chips. That might be important to some people/systems builders.
Posted on Reply
#16
BiggieShady
by: HalfAHertz
They have two versions of haswell - a quad one used for i5s and i7s and a dual core one used for pentiums and i3s. Then each of those has a few more variants for mobile where the only difference is in the GPU part. This info is from AT.
So that's what made anniversary edition possible. As I remember Ivy was cut from the same silicon. As for Haswell, in that case I'd love to see special edition i3s cut from the big die.
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