Friday, August 29th 2014

Intel Launches its Core i7-5000 Series High-end Desktop Platform

Intel launched its next-generation Core i7-5000 series high-end desktop platform, consisting of socket LGA2011-V3 Core i7 processors, and compatible motherboards based on the Intel X99 Express chipset. The platform is an upscaling of the "Haswell" micro-architecture, codenamed "Haswell-E" and targets Ultra HD gamers, media professionals, and PC enthusiasts. The platform begins with the "Haswell-E" silicon, which physically features eight "Haswell" CPU cores, a staggering 20 MB of L3 cache, a quad-channel DDR4 integrated memory controller, and a 40-lane PCI-Express Gen 3.0 root complex. Three SKUs are carved out of this silicon.

The series is led by the Core i7-5960X. Intel's first eight-core processor for the high-end desktop market, this chip features HyperThreading, which enables 16 logical CPUs for the OS to play with, 20 MB of L3 cache, and clock speeds of 3.00 GHz, with 3.50 GHz maximum Turbo Boost. It commands a price of $999. Next up, is the Core i7-5930K. A six-core chip with HyperThreading that enables 12 logical CPUs, this chip features 15 MB of L3 cache, clock speeds of 3.50 GHz with 3.70 GHz maximum Turbo Boost, and a US $583 price-tag. The most affordable chip is the Core i7-5820K. At US $389, it's the cheapest six-core HEDT chip by Intel (at launch). It features 12 MB of L3 cache, and clock speeds of 3.30 GHz, with 3.60 GHz of Turbo Boost. Too good to be true? Not so fast. It features a slimmer 28-lane PCIe root complex, so certain multi-GPU configurations won't run optimally. The Intel X99 Express chipset corrects many of the shortcomings of its predecessor, the X79 Express. It features a meaty storage controller that offers ten SATA 6 Gb/s ports, one or more SATA-Express, and M.2 slots. It also integrates a 6-port USB 3.0 host controller, and two independent 4-port USB 2.0 host controllers.
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9 Comments on Intel Launches its Core i7-5000 Series High-end Desktop Platform

#1
john_
Is it official yet? or in a few hours?
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#2
RCoon
Forum Gypsy
by: john_
Is it official yet? or in a few hours?
Wait a few hours for NDA to lift. In GMT it's usually around midday. Bare in mind it's probably a paper launch too.
Posted on Reply
#3
springs113
by: RCoon
Wait a few hours for NDA to lift. In GMT it's usually around midday. Bare in mind it's probably a paper launch too.
Not @microcenter
Posted on Reply
#7
DeSanta
by: Prima.Vera
How about any 5770K CPUs ??
Dude, 4790k just released recently, give it about 6 more months.
Posted on Reply
#8
Vinska
>AMD releases an 8-core CPU
>intel shills go laughing at it with "HAHA MOAR COARS" and the like
>intel releases an 8-core CPU
>nobody says anything about the core count in a similar fashion when it comes to intel


meh, not that expected it go in any other way, anyway
Posted on Reply
#9
john_
by: Vinska
>AMD releases an 8-core CPU
>intel shills go laughing at it with "HAHA MOAR COARS" and the like
>intel releases an 8-core CPU
>nobody says anything about the core count in a similar fashion when it comes to intel


meh, not that expected it go in any other way, anyway
AMD fans where laughing 9-10 years ago with every single core PresHOT Pentium 4 and every Pentium D 800 series toaster. Too many watts, too many GHz, too slow compared to Athlon64s.

Today we have the opposite situation. Too many cores from AMD, too many watts, too many GHz, too low performance in many occasions compared to a quad core Haswell. Also don't forget that the situation is different compared to a few years ago where applications and especially games where not as multithreaded as they are today.

8 Haswell cores today are a totally different story than 8 Bulldozer cores a few years ago.
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