Monday, September 1st 2014

Dell Also Readies the UltraSharp U2415 16:10 IPS Monitor

Dell is showing the 16:10 aspect ratio some love with its newest UltraSharp model, the U2415, which features a 24.1-inch AH-IPS panel with a native resolution of 1920 x 1200 pixels. Seen below, Dell's display comes with a slim (6.9 mm) bezel, a W-LED backlight, a 6 ms G2G respone time (that's with the FAST mode enabled), 300 cd/m2 brightness, 1,000:1 contrast ratio, a 5-port USB 3.0 hub, a stand allowing for tilt, swivel, rotate and height adjustments and one DisplayPort, one mini DisplayPort and two HDMI inputs, plus one DP out for daisy chaining (up to three monitors).

The UltraSharp U2415 can be found on Dell's Chinese website bearing a price tag of 3,299 yuan ($537/409 Euro).

Source: TFT Central
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4 Comments on Dell Also Readies the UltraSharp U2415 16:10 IPS Monitor

#1
XL-R8R
I've still got love for this resolution, even though the masses seem to hate it these days and companies dont really want to produce this aspect ratio any more.


Some great resolutions were in this format too... 1440x900/1680x1050/1920x1200 and 2560x1600, which is still a monster even by today's standards.
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#2
droopyRO
I love it too but playing Assasins Creed with black horizontal bars is not what i pay for. Face it 16:9 is a standard 16:10 21:9 etc. are not.
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#3
Rojan
I have no problems with aspect ratios (except for 5:4) as they usually have purpose. There's no such thing as a "perfect aspect ratio" as people's preferences are different.

The thing I don't like about 16:10 (1920 x 1200 specifically) is the upcharge in price. They are usually found twice the price as their 1920 x 1080 equivalent (by equivalent I mean: IPS, 6-bit+FRC, same height, etc).
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#4
SaltyFish
by: Rojan
I have no problems with aspect ratios (except for 5:4) as they usually have purpose. There's no such thing as a "perfect aspect ratio" as people's preferences are different.

The thing I don't like about 16:10 (1920 x 1200 specifically) is the upcharge in price. They are usually found twice the price as their 1920 x 1080 equivalent (by equivalent I mean: IPS, 6-bit+FRC, same height, etc).
The increased cost for 16:10 monitors isn't innate to the aspect ratio. The higher price tag arises mainly from two things:

1) 16:9 monitors are now the standard. There was a time when 16:10 monitors were commonplace. But since 16:9 is the consumer TV/movie aspect ratio, convergence happened. It's more cost effective to mass produce 1920x1080 (16:9) screens since both TVs and computer monitors can use them. As a result, 16:9 TVs and/or monitors have come down in cost.
2) 16:10 (both 1920x1200 and 2560x1600) monitors are most commonly used nowadays in graphic design and other similar production work. This means fancy features like high quality IPS and 10-bit color reproduction are standard on those monitors now and that drives the price up. Low cost 16:10 TN monitors have sadly come and pass.
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