Tuesday, February 27th 2007

RAM prices will likely increase during second half of 2007

As you may have noticed, RAM prices have dropped sharply over the past few months. Turns out that it's a good idea to "buy low, sell high", to quote a familiar stock market tip. The prices are only temporary, and as Vista really gets popular among consumers, and as prices get too low to compensate for manufacturing costs, manufacturers will simply raise prices again. Expect to see prices go back to "normal" during the second half of 2007. In the meantime, feel free to buy plenty of RAM while prices are still low and reasonable.Source: Nordic Hardware
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13 Comments on RAM prices will likely increase during second half of 2007

#1
cdawall
where the hell are my stars
quick to the cars!!!
bet TD, newegg, and various others sell out of there cheap stuff after today :D
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#2
Scavar
Damn I should my next 2GBs of RAM soon then. I still don't really understand if WinXP Pro will actually use 4GBs though, but at least ill have it for the future.

Stupid falling and rasing prices.
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#3
hv43082
So I just got 4GB of OCZ PC2-8500 SLI Certified (OCZ2N1066SR2GK) 5-5-5-15 for $470 after tax. Is this a decent deal?
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#4
Scavar
by: hv43082
So I just got 4GB of OCZ PC2-8500 SLI Certified (OCZ2N1066SR2GK) 5-5-5-15 for $470 after tax. Is this a decent deal?
My guess is yes. As 2GB of that is around 250-300. My 2Gb of ram was about 200 when I got it.
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#5
C.Ash
by: Scavar
My guess is yes. As 2GB of that is around 250-300. My 2Gb of ram was about 200 when I got it.
Anything abobe PC2-6400 is highly overpriced, as u can overclock PC2-6400 to the maximum speed that FSB's will go these days.

2GB of PC2-6400 should cost less than 200$, but if u want to get them to 8500, u should buy the CL 4 version for ~250$. The CL 3 version is also available but is also highly overpriced.
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#6
strick94u
1994 I bought 16 megs of 72 pin ram at 50 dollars a meg Ram has been cheap ever since
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#7
Benpi
This topic is complete bologna. As PCs and Ram sell more and more, the prices tend to drop. Manufacturers and developers get larger orders so they produce more and more, and lower their prices to compete with the hundreds of other companies doing the same thing.

However, the prices will rise if the technology increases. example, 2gb/4gb sticks start getting very popular.
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#8
WarEagleAU
Bird of Prey
Make it so number 2. Full speed ahead to Newegg.com
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#9
Zalmann
Price fixing

The main reason behind the recent price drop was some of the major RAM manufacturers were charged with price fixing and given considerable fines.
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#10
Pinchy
Oh well, my 2GB RAM runs great...i dont need any more :)
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#11
Zalmann
by: Pinchy
Oh well, my 2GB RAM runs great...i dont need any more :)
Ah, you have enough to run Vista!! You may need more to run your games and programs (lol) :laugh:
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#12
bruins004
Just out of curiousity, how does 4GB of RAM work on Windows XP and Vista (32 bit versions)?
From what I understand, these OSes can in fact address at most 4GB of memory, but that includes any add-in cards.
So what I take from this is if you have 4GBs of RAM and a 256mb GPU, then it will only see 3.75GB of RAM.
However, when you also add in CD and DVD drives that lowers in even more to 3.5GB of RAM.
Is this correct?
Posted on Reply
#13
Zalmann
by: bruins004
Just out of curiousity, how does 4GB of RAM work on Windows XP and Vista (32 bit versions)?
From what I understand, these OSes can in fact address at most 4GB of memory, but that includes any add-in cards.
So what I take from this is if you have 4GBs of RAM and a 256mb GPU, then it will only see 3.75GB of RAM.
However, when you also add in CD and DVD drives that lowers in even more to 3.5GB of RAM.
Is this correct?
I don't think you can count video RAM in with the system addressable memory as this is a separate subsystem. Only if you use integrated memory that uses allocated main memory (unified) as video memory. The same goes for other devices such as optical and hard drives.
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