Wednesday, May 30th 2007

Microsoft launches Surface Computing

The launch of Microsoft Surface marks the beginning of a new technology category and a user-interface revolution. Surface, Microsoft’s first surface computer, provides effortless interaction with digital content through natural hand gestures, touch and physical objects. Surface computing breaks down traditional barriers between people and technology, changing the way people interact with all kinds of everyday information — from photos to maps to menus.

Key features demonstrated in the videos included:
  • Multi-touch ability.
  • Recognition and syncing of wireless devices by placing on touch panel
  • Ability to identify non-digital devices, such as a drink glass, based on shape.
  • Hand gesture system to further interact with the touch panel.
  • New, non-windows based interface.
The videos really speak for themselves. According to the website, Surface technology will be
available in Winter 2007.Source: Microsoft Surface
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14 Comments on Microsoft launches Surface Computing

#1
Random Murderer
The Anti-Midas
meh, they stole this technology from some college students who started it as a project to play warcraft 3 using their hands...
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#2
wazzledoozle
by: Random Murderer
meh, they stole this technology from some college students who started it as a project to play warcraft 3 using their hands...
Yeaaaaaahhhhh, because we all know Warcraft 3 was around in 2001 when they first started developing this.
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#3
Random Murderer
The Anti-Midas
by: wazzledoozle
Yeaaaaaahhhhh, because we all know Warcraft 3 was around in 2001 when they first started developing this.
hey, i don't care what money$oft says, we all know they've lied in the past!
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#4
Mussels
Moderprator
by: wazzledoozle
Yeaaaaaahhhhh, because we all know Warcraft 3 was around in 2001 when they first started developing this.
Yeah, and people never ever gamed on a touchpad on a laptop before either...

The shiny part here is the synching of wireless devices (damned handy, think MP3 players/mobile phones/cameras here) and the detection of non-digital devices. I dont know why, but MS saying 'glass of water detected' would amuse me.
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#5
Easy Rhino
Linux Advocate
i saw a video of this maybe 4 years ago in early development. it was a couple of MIT students doing the work. im certain that people at microsoft saw it and paid them lots of money for the idea and to help them further its development.
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#6
demonbrawn
i'm certain that people at microsoft saw it and paid them lots of money for the idea and to help them further its development.
Yeah, I'm SURE they actually paid them:roll:

M$ doesn't pay anyone.
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#7
WarEagleAU
Bird of Prey
They would for this kind of technology.


Its like the new Virtual Reality you see in futuristic movies.
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#8
demonbrawn
haha Yeah, I was just joking, although I really wouldn't be all that surprised. I mean, they completely ripped off Apple early on. Just sayin... :slap:
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#9
lemonadesoda
Stop bitching.

This is an amazing innovation... for three reasons:

1./ New input technology... since the mouse, what have we had? The Wii controller... not much more... except for that weird $1000 keyboard with mini-displays. Surface PWNS that keyboard

2./ New screen/interface. Is this thing running Vista? Doesn't look like it. Actually, looks like it's running Mac OS. LOL. But if it is Vista... nice to see how skinnable and adaptable it is.

3./ MS goes hardware. This is serious $ for MS. Imagine... history... $50 per household for the OS, and $300 per office workstation of MS office, and $1000 per 25 workers for a Server OS. NOW we are talking about $3000++ per household for hardware. Nice. I better check the share price and start buying
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#10
mdm-adph
Bah -- all else aside, avoid Microsoft stock... with the poor adoption of Vista, the fact that OOXML isn't looking good when it comes to ISO acceptance, and the fact that their stock's been relatively stagnant for the past five years, I wouldn't recommend it.

Not to mention the fact that this technology they're proposing looks almost identical to something created by a guy called Jeff Han from NYU -- I don't know if they're working with him (I doubt it).
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#11
kakazza
Seems kinda exhausting :x
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#12
Shyska
by: mdm-adph
Bah -- all else aside, avoid Microsoft stock... with the poor adoption of Vista, the fact that OOXML isn't looking good when it comes to ISO acceptance, and the fact that their stock's been relatively stagnant for the past five years, I wouldn't recommend it.

Not to mention the fact that this technology they're proposing looks almost identical to something created by a guy called Jeff Han from NYU -- I don't know if they're working with him (I doubt it).
adoption of Vista despite all of the flaws is suprisingly great.
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#13
mdm-adph
by: Shyska
adoption of Vista despite all of the flaws is suprisingly great.
Well, the burden of proof is on you to prove that "suprisingly great" adoption of Vista exists... ;)

Either way, it's a minor point -- did you see Jeff Han's video, though? It's like Microsoft just watched it and said, "Hey, this looks great, let's throw something together quick." The OS mind you, not the hardware -- I know Microsoft's had plans for that since years ago, but then so has everyone else (Jeff Han even mentions that in the early part of his video, I think, that "the idea's been around since the 80's").
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