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Microsoft Readies Five New Patches for Next Week

For this month's Patch Tuesday Microsoft is set to deliver five fresh security update - two with a 'Critical' rating and three tagged 'Important'. According to the Redmond-based company, the incoming updates address vulnerabilities found in Windows operating systems, in Microsoft Forefront Protection 2010 for Exchange Server, and in the .NET Framework.

The patches are set to become available this Tuesday, February 11, at about 10:00 a.m. PST. For a bit more info check out the Advance Notification published here.

DisplayLink and Listeq SDK Enables a Virtually Unlimited Number of Embedded Displays

DisplayLink, the leading provider of technology for virtual graphics and USB-connected computing, and Listeq, a developer of interactive learning systems, today announced the DisplayLink SDK for Windows .NET that enables simple plug and display connectivity of a virtually unlimited number of DisplayLink-powered monitors.

DisplayLink has taken the technical challenge and complications out of connecting multiple monitors by allowing software developers to utilize an optimized approach to create systems that require large numbers of connected displays, such as:

Microsoft to Deliver Six Patches Next Week

Microsoft has today announced that next week, on this month's 'Patch Tuesday' it will be releasing 6 security bulletins - four rated 'Critical' and two 'Important' - that will tackle 11 vulnerabilities. The issues set to be resolved affect Windows, Office, Internet Explorer, Forefront UAG, and .NET Framework, and could lead to remote code execution and information disclosure.

The six patches are scheduled to go live on April 10 at 10 a.m. PDT (5 p.m. GMT). As always, Microsoft recommends that users update as quickly as possible.

The Move Away From x86 To ARM Processors On The Desktop To Start Soon - Survey

It looks like there's a subtle but relentless push to get ARM CPUs into desktop PCs. Morgan Stanley recently surveyed 30 PC makers (names not revealed) and discovered that 40% of them are interested in trying out ARM-based PCs within the next two years. As we reported previously that the Wintel alliance appears to be crumbling, this finding appears to add weight to that assertion. Of course, there's a huge mountain to climb before ARM processors can compete head to head with high performance x86, as explained in our article, not least because Microsoft won't begin supporting ARM until Windows 8 is released late next year and the fact that the vast majority of existing software won't run on ARM. A real catch-22 if ever there was one. Just as crucially, the many high performance enhancements and interface standards that currently go into making a modern x86 chip fly will also have to go into an ARM – and developing that isn't going to be cheap, although it may not take that long, since these are tried and trusted technologies that need to be applied. Still, the interest is there and Morgan Stanley expect that 10% (39 million) PCs, excluding tablets, will have an ARM processor at their heart. If true, it will make for interesting times.Source: Focus Taiwan

Microsoft Unveils Windows Azure at Professional Developers Conference

Today, during a keynote speech at the Microsoft Professional Developers Conference 2008 (PDC2008), Ray Ozzie, Microsoft Corp.’s chief software architect, announced Windows Azure, the cloud-based service foundation underlying its Azure Services Platform, and highlighted this platform’s role in delivering a software plus services approach to computing. The Azure Services Platform is an industry-leading move by Microsoft to help developers build the next generation of applications that will span from the cloud to the enterprise datacenter and deliver compelling new experiences across the PC, Web and phone.

Ozzie described how this platform combines cloud-based developer capabilities with storage, computational and networking infrastructure services, all hosted on servers operating within Microsoft’s global datacenter network. This provides developers with the ability to deploy applications in the cloud or on-premises and enables experiences across a broad range of business and consumer scenarios. A limited community technology preview (CTP) of the Azure Services Platform was initially made available to developers in attendance at PDC2008, giving them a chance to try out its features and functions and plan for their own future development.

Microsoft Releases .NET Source Code

Microsoft's Visual Studio .NET has always been an industry leader in providing a programming and debugging environment for numerous languages including Visual C++, C++/#, J/J#, Visual Basic, and many more. However, despite the general good sentiment about the product, Microsoft was often criticized for not revealing the source code to its libraries. Now Microsoft is taking steps towards open sourcing its code and finally is letting developers peek under the hood as it releases the source code to various .NET component libraries. The initial release will contain source code for the .NET Base Class Libraries (System, System.IO, System.Collections, System.Configuration, System.Threading, System.Net, System.Security, System.Runtime, System.Text, etc), ASP.NET (System.Web), Windows Forms (System.Windows.Forms), ADO.NET (System.Data), XML (System.Xml), and WPF (System.Windows). Later Microsoft will release the source code for other remaining libraries as well, including WCF, Workflow, and LINQ. The move is detailed on the blog of Scott Gu, a Microsoft employee.Source: DailyTech
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