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Nitero Demos 60 GHz Wi-Fi Solution on GLOBALFOUNDRIES' 65 nm-LPe RF Technology

Today at the 2013 Consumer Electronics Show (CES), Nitero, a fabless semiconductor company developing next-generation Wi-Fi solutions for mobile devices, demonstrated its innovative 60 GHz Wi-Fi solution manufactured on GLOBALFOUNDRIES' 65 nanometer (nm) Low Power Enhanced (LPe) RF platform optimized for mobile SoC applications.

Nitero's 60 GHz solution, which complements and completes today's Wi-Fi solutions such as 802.11n and 802.11ac, eliminates the need for physical connectors and their cables, dramatically increasing ease-of-use in tablet and handset devices. The company's multi-gigabit, ultra-low power Wi-Fi solution allows consumers to enjoy the same capabilities and flexibility of high-end notebook computers in the convenient portability of a mobile device. Compliant with the now IEEE ratified 802.11ad industry standard, Nitero plans for its upcoming solution to be Wi-Fi CERTIFIED for popular solutions from the Wi-Fi Alliance such as Wi-Fi Direct and Miracast.

Wilocity Demos First Commercially Available 60 GHz 802.11ad Products at CES

Wilocity, a leading developer of 60 GHz multi-gigabit wireless chipsets, today announced at International CES that it is demonstrating the industry's first commercially available end user products integrating Wilocity chipsets compliant with the newly ratified IEEE 802.11ad 60 GHz wireless standard. Additionally, the company will be the first to demonstrate application level tri-band networking with seamless Fast Session Transfer connected to a tri-band AP.

The company's appearance at CES follows a year of rapid momentum for Wilocity, including its recent announcement with Dell of the first commercially available WiGig-enabled product, new technology partnerships and partnership advances with Marvell and Qualcomm-Atheros and numerous other awards and industry recognition.

Wilocity WiGig Technology Powering Dell Latitude 6430u Ultrabook

Heralding a new era in high-speed wireless connectivity, Wilocity, the leading developer of 60 GHz multi-gigabit wireless chipsets, today announced that it is jointly providing tri-band wireless chipsets with Qualcomm Atheros, Inc., for Dell's first WiGig enabled Ultrabook for business, the Latitude 6430u. Dell announced the Latitude 6430u last week and demonstrated its multi-gigabit wireless docking and networking capabilities at a Windows 8 launch attended by Dell and Microsoft executives in New York City.

Dell's new Latitude 6430u Ultrabook, integrating the Tri-band chipset from Wilocity and Qualcomm-Atheros, will be among the very first devices to reach the market featuring WiGig technology (IEEE 802.11ad). WiGig technology represents a new and major step forward in the wireless mobile experience by allowing data transfer rates that are over 10 times faster than current Wi-Fi technologies. Wilocity and Qualcomm Atheros' Tri-band system allows Ultrabook users to connect to peripherals such as docks, displays and storage at multi-gigabit speeds, while maintaining standard Wi-Fi coverage throughout the enterprise.

Intel Labs Tunes Into a Wireless Future Where Everything That Computes is Connected

In his keynote today at the Intel Developer Forum, Intel Chief Technology Officer Justin Rattner said, “In the future, if it computes, it connects. From the simplest embedded sensors to the most advanced cloud datacenters, we’re looking at techniques to allow all of them to connect without wires.”

Rattner demonstrated for the first time a working, all-digital WiFi radio, dubbed a “Moore’s Law Radio.” The CTO explained that an all-digital radio follows Moore’s Law by scaling in area and energy efficiency with such digital chip processes as Intel’s latest 22nm tri-gate technology. System-on-chip designs for smartphones and tablet computers would be the most likely spot for the all digital radios to be integrated. The small size and lower cost of integrated digital radios will enable a host of new applications from wearable devices to “The Internet of Things” where devices such as home appliances with sensors can communicate with each other, exchange data and can be operated remotely.

Panasonic Develops World's Lowest Power Chip for Multi-Gigabit Wireless Communication

Panasonic Corporation today announced it has developed a chipset for multi-gigabit millimeter wave wireless communication that offers the industry's lowest power consumption of less than 1 Watt by employing a new baseband processing architecture.

The new chipset will enable stable interactive communication between various kinds of devices supporting the specification developed by the WiGig Alliance. Panasonic had previously developed fundamental CMOS circuit technologies for 60 GHz transceiver and modem signal processing circuits, but now an additional radio packet processing block has been integrated as a key block of the chipset. This plays a significant role in accelerating the realization of simple to use high-definition video data sharing/streaming applications for mobile devices.

Sony and Tokyo Tech Make Chip Capable of 6.3 Gb/s Millimeter-Wave Wireless Transfer

Sony Corporation today announced that the National University Corporation, Tokyo Institute of Technology and Sony have jointly developed a radio frequency ("RF") LSI and a baseband ("BB") LSI that enables millimeter-wave wireless data transfer at the world's fastest rate of 6.3 Gb/s. This technological achievement was adopted for presentation at the International Solid-State Circuits Conference (ISSCC) to be held in San Francisco from February 19, 2012 as academic paper No. 12.3 wherein details of the technology will be disclosed.

Panasonic Develops its own Gigabit Wireless Network Tech, Packs it into SD Card

Earlier this year, we got to see the first implementations of the IEEE 802.11ac specification take stage at CES, which promised wireless networking at speeds as high as 1.3 Gbps. On the sidelines, consumer electronics major Panasonic has been developing a gigabit speed wireless networking technology of its own. Called the WiGig, this technology provides up to 1 Gbps network bandwidth, but to achieve that, devices need to be within a range of 3 meters. The technology uses 60 GHz high-frequency band to transmit and receive data.

While its low 3 meter range might look self-defeating to the idea of wireless networking, Panasonic thinks there are some good ways to put the technology to use. These include transmission of HD video between a car's entertainment system unit tucked away into the dashboard to the screens behind the headrests for passengers in the back seats, without wires. Ad-hoc networks using this could also greatly speed up data transfer between two devices in close range. Panasonic packed the hardware for this technology into SD cards, which can communicate with host devices over SDIO.

A related video follows.

New Wireless 60 GHz Standard Promises Ultra-Fast Short Distance Transfer

The Georgia Electronic Design Center (GEDC) at the Georgia Institute of Technology has produced a CMOS chip capable of transmitting 60 GHz digital RF signals. This short-range new technology, if finalized, could offer many benefits, such as extremely fast wireless peer-to-peer connectivity in short ranges between virtually any device. That chip can even make the cables used nowadays for connection obsolete. Among the many potential 60 GHz applications are virtually wireless desktop-computer setups and data centers, wireless home DVD systems, in-store kiosks that transfer movies to handheld devices in seconds, and the potential to move gigabytes of photos or video from a camera to a PC almost instantly without cables. The single-chip CMOS component integrates a low-power radio with an embedded antenna, that draws only 100 milliwatts of power when operating, making it not only very small but extremely efficient too. GEDC researchers have already achieved very high data transfer rates that promise unprecedented short-range wireless speeds — 15 Gbps at a distance of 1 meter, 10 Gbps at 2 meters and 5 Gbps at 5 meters, enough for transmitting uncompressed 720p or 1080i video.
"We believe this new standard represents a major step forward," said Joy Laskar, a member of the Ecma 60 GHz standards committee and director of the Georgia Electronic Design Center ( GEDC ) at Georgia Tech. "Consumers could see products capable of ultra-fast short-range data transfer within two or three years." The specifications for this technology, which involves chips capable of sending RF signals in the 60 GHz range, are expected to be published as an ISO standard in 2009.

Source: Georgia Tech
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