Saturday, October 27th 2007

Patriot Releases 32GB Xporter XT Boost USB Drive

Patriot Memory recently announced a 32GB version to their Xporter XT Boost line (PEF32GUSB). The USB drive has read speeds of up to 150x, which makes it one of the fastest USB Flash Drives in the market. It is also certified for Windows Vista and is ReadyBoost compliant. The 32GB Xporter XT Boost is designed with a rubber water resistant housing making it reliable for users to transport. Just in case anything happens, it is backed by a lifetime warranty.

Source: Patriot Memory
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40 Comments on Patriot Releases 32GB Xporter XT Boost USB Drive

#1
ex_reven
panchoman said:
too lazy to read everything, what'd i mistake lol.
i was saying that you can basically use this a flash hard drive and install and os and all on it, and so that way it'd act like a portable ssd drive. ssd is what they call the flash hard drives right?
Basically yes.
Flash based SSD uses NAND flash.
Im not sure what this particular usb uses.
Posted on Reply
#2
Jizzler
ex_reven said:
I only mentioned RAM SSD because panchoman accidently mistook the USB drive for the same thing. Then twistedsisted mentioned how a decent RAID beat SSDs and you disagreed and showed a benchmark so I posted the article about the write problems experienced with SSDs that show that your benchmark an innaccurate way of comparing SSD to HDD especially since a ram based SSD requires a hard drive to operate anyway, so I dont think its entirely suitable to the discussion.

The reason I posted info on flash based SSD is because we are talking about a USB device, not one located on the PCI bus.
You keep mixing ram and flash based SSD's.

It IS in inaccurate way of comparing flash-based SSD vs a HD, but not when comparing RAM-based SSD to HD, which is what the comment I quoted was about (the iRam).
Posted on Reply
#3
ex_reven
Jizzler said:
You keep mixing ram and flash based SSD's.
Yeah I know, I just realised how much I confused myself lol.

Jizzler said:

It IS in inaccurate way of comparing flash-based SSD vs a HD, but not when comparing RAM-based SSD to HD, which is what the comment I quoted was about (the iRam).
Ok. So to sum up everything.

This patriot usb drive is just high capacity flash memory. Regardless of whether it works on the basis of being a SSD or just a fast flash drive it is still restricted by the max speed of the USB port.

Secondly, flash based SSDs are slower than a decent raid setup, or even good single disks. Hard drives have the advantage of write speed over flash based ssds.
RAM based SSDs are definately faster than hard drives, though they are volatile, so they arnt hard drives as such, since they can only store data while they are on and require a hard drive to load from and save to when turning the computer on and off.

In any case this USB is capable of ~20MB/sec. If my calculation from kiB's is correct.

Do you agree with me on this?
Posted on Reply
#4
Jizzler
:toast:

Yeah, especially with USB flash drives.
Posted on Reply
#5
tony929292
well i am sure it is a bit better then my rally2 but heres sum benchs comparing a good usb flash and avg raid set up
Posted on Reply
#6
Wile E
Power User
ex_reven said:
RAM based SSDs are definately faster than hard drives, though they are volatile, so they arnt hard drives as such, since they can only store data while they are on and require a hard drive to load from and save to when turning the computer on and off.
Yeah, they're volatile, but they don't load from a HD. They have a battery, and some also plug directly into a wall to keep power. If you lose power, they fall back on the battery, which is usually good for 24-48Hrs. It's always a good idea to keep an image of the drive handy tho. lol.

Ram disks usually completely max out the interface speed. If you ports are capable of putting out 400MB/s, the ram disks will do it.
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#7
ex_reven
Wile E said:
Yeah, they're volatile, but they don't load from a HD. They have a battery, and some also plug directly into a wall to keep power. If you lose power, they fall back on the battery, which is usually good for 24-48Hrs. It's always a good idea to keep an image of the drive handy tho. lol.

Ram disks usually completely max out the interface speed. If you ports are capable of putting out 400MB/s, the ram disks will do it.
So your saying that if you left your computer off long enough (unplugged) youd lose that data? It doesnt sound very ideal for most people :ohwell:
Posted on Reply
#8
Wile E
Power User
ex_reven said:
So your saying that if you left your computer off long enough (unplugged) youd lose that data? It doesnt sound very ideal for most people :ohwell:
No, many of them actually plug into the wall as well (usually an adapter of sorts). Only lose data if your power goes out for 24hrs+. That's why you want to keep an image of the drive elsewhere. Just in case that happens. Deffo don't want to use it for storage, tho.
Posted on Reply
#9
ex_reven
Wile E said:
No, many of them actually plug into the wall as well (usually an adapter of sorts). Only lose data if your power goes out for 24hrs+. That's why you want to keep an image of the drive elsewhere. Just in case that happens. Deffo don't want to use it for storage, tho.
Thats what I said lol.

me
So your saying that if you left your computer off long enough (unplugged) youd lose that data?
Posted on Reply
#10
niko084
ex_reven said:
Different types of flash memory tho.
Just because you have a large USB drive doesnt mean its faster than your hard drive.

Last time I checked, USB had like a theoretical maximum transfer speed of like 100mb/sec, not exactly ideal...
USB 2.0 is 480mbps....
And the search time is next to none, write time is next to none, all around "good newer" cards are WAY faster than any mechanical hard drive.

And once we get them off of crap USB and give them full potential..............:rockout:
Posted on Reply
#11
ex_reven
niko084 said:
USB 2.0 is 480mbps....
And the search time is next to none, write time is next to none, all around "good newer" cards are WAY faster than any mechanical hard drive.

And once we get them off of crap USB and give them full potential..............:rockout:
Ive never seen any usbs (flash drives) that are faster than hard drives :ohwell:
All of them were like this one, 20-25MB/sec max
Posted on Reply
#12
Wile E
Power User
ex_reven said:
Thats what I said lol.
No, the computer does not = the Ram disk. Unplug the Ram-disk for too long, and you lose data. Unplug the computer, but not the Ram-disk, and you are fine.
Posted on Reply
#13
ex_reven
Wile E said:
No, the computer does not = the Ram disk. Unplug the Ram-disk for too long, and you lose data. Unplug the computer, but not the Ram-disk, and you are fine.
:wtf:
Isnt RAM disk run on a PCI slot? Like the one APK had.
APK's was a PCI card with RAM slots on it.

The way you describe it its like an external hard drive.

Google Image Result of Ramdisk -
Posted on Reply
#14
Wile E
Power User
ex_reven said:
:wtf:
Isnt RAM disk run on a PCI slot? Like the one APK had.
APK's was a PCI card with RAM slots on it.

The way you describe it its like an external hard drive.

Google Image Result of Ramdisk - http://www.bccsoftware.com/images/prodserv/RAMDisk.jpg
It's a PCI card, but most hook to a sata port for data transfer, thus the red SATA port on the top-right of the one pictured. And many have the option to hook up an external power source, to prevent them from losing data when the computer is off.
Posted on Reply
#15
ex_reven
Wile E said:
It's a PCI card, but most hook to a sata port for data transfer, thus the red SATA port on the top-right of the one pictured. And many have the option to hook up an external power source, to prevent them from losing data when the computer is off.
Ahk. The way I envisioned it that it was setup so that the ramdisk still got power from the actual PSU when the computer is off. Eg - When I turn off my PC my mobo still has an LED on to show that there is power on. I just assumed it drew from the PSU after the compy turned off, rather than an external power source since they tend not to draw much power.
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